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Full text of "Spotlight, 1984-85"

Welcome! 

A Message from Dr. Robert L. Breuder, College President 



I feel very proud, and very excited, to welcome you to 
Fall 1984 at Ttie Willlamsport Area Community College. 

We've come off a very exciting summer - one 
highlighted on campus by the opening of the nev^ Lifelong 
Education Center, and one which spread excitement 
worldwide several weeks ago when our nation hosted the 
1984 Summer Olympics. 

I'm sure all of us are still basking in the afterglow of 
those Olympic Games - alive, not only with the thrill of com- 
petition, but also with the intense desire of all the athletes to 
pursue and achieve their lifelong goals and ambitions. 

The Games had a lesson for all of us: that directed ef- 
forts and hard work do pay off. Putting a maximum effort in- 
to all we do in life is rewarding - not typically in gold medals 
- but in the personal satisfaction of knowing we've done our 
very best. 



At The Willlamsport Area Community College - in 
everything we do - we intend to be the best. We're working 
hard to achieve that goal by providing new, modern facilities 
and equipment for our students, by updating existing pro- 
grams and adding new programs that will answer the job 
needs of the future, and by staying close to our students and 
our community to determine their needs and bring our 
responsibilities into focus. 



No doubt, you enter this Fall 1 984 semester with goals 
of your own. We're proud you chose this institution to help 
you achieve your ambitions. With all of us - you, me, other 
students, faculty and administrators - pulling together, our 
dreams of winning "the gold" in life can be realized. 



Spotlight 

Vol. 20, No. 1 D Mondi;. Aag. 27, 1984 D I Ptges 
Willianuporl Area Commnnit; College D Williimsport, Pi. 17701 




LISTENING ~ Studenls beginning studies at the College last weeli attended an 
orientation, including comments by Steven D. Metzker (at podium), president 
of the Student GoTernmenI Association, in the Academic Center Auditorium. 

ISPOTLIGHT photo by Canda M. Zinckj 



Ml vehicles must 

be registered 

for campus parking 

All students who plan to use the 
College parking facilities for the current 
academic year are urged to register their 
vehicles with the Security Office, accor- 
ding to Lawrence P. Smeak, supervisor 
of security. 

The Security Office is at the foot of 
Park Street. 

Vehicle parking stickers can be ob- 
tained Monday through Friday from 8 
IPIease turn to Paee 61 



College Bookstore hours extended 
for Fall semester and Weekend College 



Hours during which the College 
Bookstore will be open have been ex- 
tended for the start of the new semester 
and for students taking Weekend Col- 
lege classes, according to Eleonore R. 
Holcomb, Bookstore supervisor. 

The extended hours include: 

Today, Monday, Aug. 27, through 
this Thursday, Aug. 30 - 8 a.m. to 9 
p.m. 

This Friday, Aug. 31 ~ 8 a.m. to 
4:30 p.m. 



THIS IS THE PLACE - Chatting about a plaque to note the naming of the 
College's new dining facility are Steven D. Metzker, Student Government 
Association, and Karen L. Heaton, nursery management student from Avis, 
who submitted the winning name for the facility ~ Susquehanna Room. They 
are in the atrium section of the Susquehanna Room. [SPOTLIGHT photo/ 

Friday deadline 
for adding classes; 
form required 

Any student wanting to drop or 
add a class to his or her schedule must 
fill out a change form. The forms are 
available at the Student Records Office, 
Room 108, Academic Center, according 
to information provided by the Student 
Records Office. 

Whether adding or dropping a 

course, the student must have his or her 

advisor's approval. Any student who 

P>lease turn to Page 6J 



This Saturday, Sept. 1 ~ 8:30 a.m. 
to 10 a.m. 

Next Tuesday, Sept. 4, through 
next Thursday, Sept. 6-8 a.m. to 9 
p.m. 

Next Friday, Sept. 7-8 a.m. to 7 
p.m. 

Next Saturday, Sept. 8 - 8:30 a.m. 
to 10:30 a.m. 

Monday, Sept. 10 - 8 a.m. to 7:30 
p.m. 

Friday, Oct. 19 ~ 8 a.m. to 7 p.m. 



Valuable Coupons in This Issue! 



' >* ** "■ ^ ■. **^*^J 



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2 D SPOTLIGHT D FibsiDav-of-Cusses Issue D Monday. Aug. 27, 1984 



The common bond: Growth 



SPOTLIGHT commentary 



The College is teaming with a few thousand of us to- 
day - each with our own purpose for being a part of the of- 
ficial first day of classes. But each o( us is linl<ed with the 
other students and with the College by a connmon bond: 
Growth. 

True, this institution is growing faster and larger than 
anyone anticipated. 

We may be a mere number or product in the eyes of 
some, but if each of us mentally, physically, and emotional- 
ly survive this first day of unwanted nervous knots in the 
stomach and asking barrages of questions about instruc- 
tors, classes, books, and bathrooms - they will be growing 
through us and because of us. 

For some of us, today is simply a laid-back, uneventful 
period of time to "gel out of the way" before plunging into 
subjects that will be the primary cause of future migraines 
- tests and research papers and pop quizzes and lectures 
and let's not mention any more! 



But for others of us, today symbolizes a transition - or, 
if you will, a historic moment in life. For each of us is not 
the typical 18 to whatever-year-old who must only be 
responsible for himself or herself: But rather, each of us 
has surmounted months or years of odds to be here today. 

We and the College are in transition. The College is 
striving to build, to provide courses and activities geared 
for the future and we are striving to provide a better access 
into the working world. 

But not all of us are here solely for preparing for future 
employment. Some are here to grow internally, to ex- 
perience more of life, and to pursue the options which will 
be revealed by establishing ourselves as a student of this 
College today. 

And by being involved with this growing education 
center - through classes, clubs, sports, and seminars - we 
have the unlimited vital opportunity to be recognized not 
only on campus, but locally, nationally, and internationally. 



The British have landed! 

Commentary on music by Richard E. Kopp Jr. 
Of The SPOTLIGHT Staff 

The British are comingl The British are coming! This time not for the land, 
but rather for the radio and video airwaves. 

This reviewer shares his most recent musings of the more commercially- 
known musical acts whose offerings have been pouring from local radio sta- 
tions and nationwide music television programs. 

Duran Duran What is there to say? Every little girl in America loves them 
since they appeal only to pre-adolescents. Send them back to England on a 
slow, leaky boat. 

Eurythmics. The first half of this duo, Annie Lennox, is the owner of a very 
appealing voice, but she could use a haircut. Her counterpart, Dave Stewart, 
has proved himself as a songwriter and has shown expertise in his work with a 
synthesizer 

A Flock of Seagulls. Might as well have remained in their native nesting 
grounds, along with Echo and the Bunnymen, Soft Cell, and Kajagoogoo. 

Thompson Twins. Although there are three twins and not one of them is 
related, they possess the characteristics needed to be successful in the music 
business. 

Billy Idol. We'll discuss him when he produces a real song. 

Culture Club. We saved the most commercial group for our last respects. 
Culture Club has been a phenomenal success in the States, thanks to their 
flamboyant lead singer. Boy George. But when will the man decide on his real 
identity? 

But whether your attitude toward England's second most popular musical 
invasion is good, bad, or indifferent, the British have landed in full force. 



Next Week 

in The 
SPOTLIGHT 
* Crossword 
Puzzle 
Returns 

• The Story 

of the $100,000 

Model Train 

Collection 

■k New Faces, 
New Names 

• More About 

The Summer's 

Happenings 



SPOTLIGHT distribution 

The SPOTLIGHT will be 
distributed to various locations around 
l^ain Campus as well as to North Cam- 
pus, Natural Resources Campus and 
the Aviation Facility between 7:30 and 
8:30 a.m. each li^onday. 

SPOTLIGHT 
FIrst-Day-ol-Classes Issue 
Monday. Aug. 27, 1984 

Ths SPOTLIQHT Is publlstied as a co- 
currlcular sclivily each Monday of ttie 
academtc year, except tor oHIclal Col- 
lege holidays, by journalism and other 
interested students. Opinions express- 
ed by the newspaper do not represent 
the oHiclal opinion of the College. 

Office: Room 7, Academic Center. 
Wllilamsport Area Community College. 
100S W. Third St.. Wllilamsport. Pa. 
17701. Telephone: (717) 326-3761. Ext. 
221. 

The SPOTLIGHT Is a member of 
the Columbia Scholastic Press 
Association. 

Production Staff This Issue 
Donna M. Barnett. Kathy L. Elswert, 
Kathryn M. Gilbert, Gisela 0. Grassley. 
Robert O. Hawk. Rodney 0. HIil. Karen 
M. Matarko, Jennifer S. White, Canda 
M. ZInck. 
::Si»^-:S»V^W;WfilM%W*SSSWTSU¥::¥:¥:::¥:::: 



'However, there are always 

some diamonds lurking 
in the prime-time trash heap' 

Commentary on TV by James K. Morrissey 
Of The SPOTLIGHT Staff 

Network programs turn your television into a crypt. With each repetitive 
Sitcom and ruthlessly edited movie, it becomes apparent that creativity and im- 
agination died years ago at ABC, CBS, and NBC. 

Years ago? Perhaps those traits never existed. Think of the past 
"classics" like "Laugh-In", "The Sonny and Cher Show", "Ivlclvlillan and 
Wife", "Soap", and "Partridge Family". Better yet, try not to. 

Even more atrocities are currently perpetrated by the "Big Three" - with 
"Real People", "Knight Rider", the "A-Team", "Harcastle and lulcCormick", 
"Silver Spoons", and "Magnum, P.I." providing clear examples of pure gar- 
bage. 

However, there are always some diamonds lurking in the prime-time trash 
heap, including "Hill Street Blues" which contains surprisingly good plot and 
dialogue. 

As more alternatives become available, including HBO, IVITV, and other 
satellite stations, network TV appears to be losing viewers. This situation may 
force the "trinopoly" to actively compete beyond the scope of each other and 
provide quality entertainment or fade from the scene. To me, the latter would 
be quite acceptable. This reviewer would shed no tears over the demise of 
network television 



Notification of Non-Discrimination 

The Williamsport Area Community College follows a policy of non- 
discrimination in all of its curricula, student activities and student related 
policies and procedures. The Williamsport Area Community College 
does not discriminate on the basis of age, sex, handicap, race, religion, 
creed, national origin or veteran status. Employers, contractors and 
others who do not follow a similar policy will be discouraged from having 
contact with the Williamsport Area Community College students. A stu- 
dent who feels discriminated against because of his/her age, sex, han- 
dicap, race, religion, creed, national origin or veteran status, is encourag- 
ed to report such discrimination to the Title VI, IX and section 504 coor- 
dinator, Ivlr. Lawrence W. Emery, Jr., in Room 157-F. Learning 
Resources Center. The student then can be advised of the appropriate 
grievance procedure if necessary. 
Grievance procedure steps: 

1 . The Title VI, IX and section 504 coordinator will determine if there 
is evidence to indicate a violation may have occurred. 

2. The Coordinator will contact the parties concerned and attempt to 
resolve the issue 

3. If the issue is not resolved to the satisfaction of both parties, the 
Coordinator (through the Associate Dean of Educational Services) will 
convene the Student-Faculty Judicial Committee for a hearing. 

4. The committee will hear the evidence as presented by the Coor- 
dinator and will follow its procedures as outlined elsewhere in the hand- 
book under Student Rights and Responsibilities. 

5. The Committee will forward its recommendations to the President 
for action. 



Student-operated 
radio's planned air 
date is Sept. 4 

WWAS-FM, the College's student- 
operated radio station, is planning to 
begin operation next Tuesday, Sept. 4, 
after completion of testing on the studio 
equipment, according to Mrs. Linda 
Winiarczyk, assistant professor of 
broadcasting and station advisor. 

Station facilities have been moved 
to the new Lifelong Education Center. 
They formerly were located in the Ad- 
ministration Building. 

"I'm delighted with the new sec- 
tion," Mrs. Winiarczyk said. "We have 
a lot more room and we've obtained 
new equipment that's been needed for a 
long time." 

The station's broadcast hours will 
be from 8 to midnight Mondays through 
Thursdays and from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. 
on Fridays. 

The daily music schedule will be; 
classical music. 8 to 10 a.m.; jazz, 10 
a.m. to noon; top forty, noon to 6 
p.m., and rock'n'roll, 6 p.m. to mid- 
night. 

The advisor pointed out that while 
the student operators in the past ac- 
cepted requests for music, no requests 
will be taken this semester because there 
is no phone Ime as yet 




PRESIDENT - Jonathan MUler is 
president of Phi Beta Lambda, 
business-oriented student group. The 
Phi Beta Lambda office now is in the 
basement of the Academic Center. 
ISPOTLIGHT photoj 

Journalism student 
wins contest award 

Donna M. Barnett, a third 
semester journalism student from Mif- 
flintown and managing editor of the 
SPOTLIGHT, recently won a third 
place award and a "most popular" vote 
in a photography contest sponsored by 
the Juniata County Library, Mifflin- 
town. 

Miss Barnett used a Minolta SLR 
35mm camera to photograph her winn- 
ing pictures. Both pictures featured a 
week-old fawn found in a hayfield near 
her home. 



Monday. Aug. 17, 1984 D FiRST-DAV-OF'CLASses Issue D Spotucht a 2 

Phi Beta Lambda 'gearing up'; 
membership drive begins soon 

Courtesy Report by PBL Representative 

Phi Beta Lambda, the college level of Future Business Leaders of 
America, will start its 13th year on the campus of The Williamsport Area 
Community College. 

Phi Beta Lambda is a business-oriented club and all students who are 
in the Business and Computer Science Technology Division or who take a 
business-related subject are eligible to join. Active recruiting will start the 
week of Sept. 3 

Newly-elected officers who will serve this year include Jonathan 
Miller, president; Todd Bogenrief, vice president; Elizabeth Bogenrief, 
secretary; Tina Poust, treasurer; Judy Brokaw, administrative aide, and 
James Matthews, administrative aide. 

Many activities are planned for this semester and those plans will be 
discussed at the first open meeting of the club. Date for this meeting will be 
announced next week. 

Phi Beta Lambda held its 33rd annual National Leadership Con- 
ference in Atlanta, Ga. last month. Fifty-two students from Pennsylvania 
colleges attended - including two students from The Williamsport Area 
Community College. Paul Pauling, accounting student from Montgomery, 
and David Haas, computer science student from Jersey Shore, were in 
Atlanta and will bring greetings and stories of the conference to one of the 
early meetings of the campus group. 

Advisors for the local club include Paul W. Goldfeder, who also is 
Pennsylvania state advisor, and Thomas Leitzel and Valerie Haydock. 

New office for Phi Beta Lambda is in the Academic Center - on the 
lower level (basement). Room 3. 

New students may inquire at the PBL office for applications to join 
the club. 



SME activities for year outlined; career-related tours, visits highlighted 



The Student Society of Manufacturing and Engineering (SME) has 
scheduled a variety of career-related activities for this academic year, ac- 
cording to Chalmer C. Van Horn, associate professor of drafting and ad- 
visor to the club. 

Those activities include: 
Sept. 10 ~ Plant tour, Avco, Williamsport. 
Oct. 8 - Plant tour, C-COR Electronics, Inc., State College. 
Nov. 12 ~ CNC Programming Demonstration, EMCO Maier Corp., 
Columbus, Ohio (at The Sheraton, Williamsport). 

Dec. 10 - "Electricity: What Does It Do and Cost?", Pennsylvama 



Golf team meeting 

to be at 4 on Wednesday 

All students interested in trying out 
for the varsity golf team are urged to at- 
tend a meeting scheduled for this 
Wednesday, Aug. 29, at 4 p.m., in 
Room 102, Bardo Gym, according to 
Harry C. Specht, assistant professor of 
physican education. 

The team is open to both male and 
female students. 

Anyone interested in trying out for 
the golf team but unable to attend the 
meeting should contact Specht in Room 
106, Bardo Gym, he said. 



Check cashing 
service cancelled 

The check cashing service formerly 
provided by the Bursar's Office was 
discontinued July I and is not longer 
available to students, staff and faculty. 

A MAC teller machine, outside the 
Academic Center, may be used in place 
of the former service. Information 
about receiving a MAC card is available 
from Commonweahh Bank & Trust Co. 
or from the College Personnel Office, 
Ext. 314. 



Power & Light Co., Berwick (at The Sheraton, Wilhamsport). 

Jan. 14 - "Better Communications is Better Motivation", Van 
Straten Chemical Co., Chicago, III (at The Sheraton, WiUiamsport). 

Feb. II - "Carbide Cutting Tool Materials in Review", Adamas 
Carbide Corp., Kenilworth, N.J. (at The Sheraton, Williamsport). 

March 2 - "Changes in the Bell System", Bell of Pennsylvania (at 
The Sheraton, Williamsport). 

April 8 - "What to Demand from a Lubricant", Fiske Brothers 
Refining Co., Newark, N.J. (at the Sheraton, Williamsport). 

May 13 - "Lasers in Modem Industry", Photon Sources, Inc., 
Feeding Hills, Mass. (at the Sheraton, Williamsport.) 

W.A.C.C. 
BUS SCHEDULE 

DESTINATION 

U«»e Uirning Resources, go lo N«liir«l Resoorcn 
Leave Nalunl Resources, go lo Learning Resources 
Leave Learning Resources, go lo Natural Resources 
Leave Natural Resources, go lo Learning Resources 
MONDAY, WEDNESDAY, THURSDAY 
Uave Leaning Resources, go lo Natural Resources 
Leave Natural Resources, go lo Learning Resources 

TUESDAY ONLY 
Leave Learning Resources, go lo Natural Resources 
Leave Nalural Resources, go lo Learning Resources 

FRIDAY ONLY 
Leave Learning Resources, go lo Nalural Resources 
Leave Nalural Resources, go lo Learning Resources 



BUS 


TIME 


1. 


7:15 


2. 


9:15 


3. 


10:15 


4. 


1:05 


5. 


4:0« 




5:00 


5. 


}:00 




4:00 


5. 


3:00 




4:00 




Church of the Annunciation 

410 Walnut Street 

(Corner of West Fourth and Walnut Sts.) 

Telephone: 323-9456 

Msgr. William J. Fleming, V.F., Pastor 

Fattier Richard J. Locli, Asst. 

Fattier Bert S. Kozen, Asst. 

Father Joseph D. Gilbert, in residence 

/ know Mine and Mine know Me... for these I will give My lift 



John 10:14-15 



Schedule of Services 
weekend masses: 

Saturday Evening - 4 P.M. and 5:30 P.M. 

Sunday Morning - 7:30, 9:00, 10:15, and 11:30 A.M. 

Sunday Afternoon - 5:00 P.M. 
DAILY MASSES: 

7:00 and 8:00 A.M. and 12:10 P.M. (except Saturday) 
SACRAMENT OF CONFESSION: Saturday, 4:45 lo 5:30 P.M. 
or by appointment. 



4 D SPOTUGHT D Flier-DAY-Of-CLASSfs Issut D Monday, Aug. 27, 19M 



Welcome Back! Clip Th 



JOE MIGNANO'S SUB SHOP 

CORNER OF 2nd & MAYNARD 

PHONE 323-7443 



50' Off Any Whole Sub or 
Not Already on Special 

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Coupon expires Sept. 7, 1984 



Pizza 



JOHNNIE'S NEWS 

1162 W. FOURTH St. 
WILLIAMSPORT, PA. 



•NEWSPAPERS 'MAGAZINES 'PAPERBACKS 

•TOBACCO PRODUCTS •LOTTERY TICKETS 

Open Seven Days A Week 



L J 

Full accreditation reaffirmed 
for College after evaluation 




DELIVERANCE 

LIFETIME SPORTS 



2 West Southern Avenue 

South Wllllamsporl, PA 17701 

(717)322-8066 



A CANOER'S DELIGHT - We Need to 
Sell 25 Canoes by Labor Day. 
Therefore, all Canoes will be sold 
at... COST& 10% 



We must reduce all 
running shoes, 
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COST& 10% 



Humpty Dumnpty 

SUB & PIZZA SHOPS 

10* OFF ANY WHOLE SUB 




Soulhside 

Central i Market Students... 

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Creekside 

Lycoming Creek Road 

322-9030 



Courtesy College litformalion Office 
The Commission on Higher Educa- 
tion, Middle Stales Association of Col- 
leges and Schools has reaffirmed the full 
accreditation of the College for 10 
years, through June 1994. 

The reaffirmation came at the June 
20-22 session of the Commission with 
the College being notified June 27. 

The value of the accreditation to 
the College is that it demonstrates to the 
public thai the College, in fact, meets 
accepted standards for the level of 
educational programming associated 
with its philosophy and mission. 
Team report submilled 
The Middle States Association Ac- 
creditation Team, comprised of II 
members, visited the College April 8 
through April II for the purpose of 
evaluating the College for reaffirmation 
of accreditation by the Middle States 
Association. 

The team leader - Dr. Robert L. 
Cell, president, Cecil Community Col- 
lege, North East, Md. - submitted a 
report to the Middle States Association 
for action in June. 

While on campus, the team 

locker requests being taken 

Female students who want a locker 
in the women's locker room may submit 
a request to Harry C. Specht, assistant 
professor of physical education, in 
Room 106, Bardo Gym, or by telephon- 
ing him at Ext. 417. 

Locker numbers must be registered 
before the lockers are secured with 
locks, he added. 



members met with nearly all ad- 
ministrative staff, talked with faculty 
and other staff about the quality of 
education and services. Members also 
talked at random with students and met 
with them in groups. 

Documents provided 

Prior to their arrival on campus, 
team members had been provided with 
documents developed by the College. 
These documents included a plan for 
"planning", a North Campus Needs 
Assessment Study, the College Fact 
Book, the first draft of the Long Range 
Plan (for 1984-1989), and the Assess- 
ment Report. After review of the evalua- 
tion materials, the Commission con- 
cluded that the College had approached 
the self-study and planning process in a 
very serious manner. 

Participation noted 

Even though the accreditation ex- 
tends through June 1994, the College 
will submit a "periodic review report" 
to the association in April 1989. 

The College's concentrated effort 
for the Middle States Association ac- 
creditation visit began in August 1982. 
Dr. Daniel J. Doyle, professor of 
government, history, sociology, and 
philosophy, was chairman of the Steer- 
ing Committee for the Long Range Plan 
and Middle States team visit. 

The office of Rodney G. Hurley, 
dean of educational research, planning 
and evaluation, provided staft' and 
technical support for the Steering Com- 
mittee and eight area committees. Com- 
mittees were comprised of students, 
faculty, and College Board of Trusteees 
members. 



College phones 
adapted to 911 
for emergency calls 

The College became part of the ad- 
vanced communications technology of 
the Greater Williamsport area when the 
911 emergency number was installed on 
the Main Campus in early July. 

The number was installed in the ci- 
ty over six months ago and is challed 
through the Lycoming County Com- 
munications Center. It is a standard 
number that is used to contact local 
police, fire, and ambulances. 

According to David Hoyes, direc- 
tor of business operations, a smaJl com- 
puter chip was implemented into the 
campus main switchboard unit in the 
corridor between the Administration 
Building and the Learning Resources 
Center. The cost of the small operation 
was a few hundred dollars, Hoyes 
stated. 

The director pointed out that in ac- 
tuality the emergency number for the 
College is 991 1 - since the extra 9 digit 
is needed in order to dial off campus. 

He added that campus phones that 
do not have the off-campus diahng 
capability may still use the emergency 
number. 

It was noted that the eastern sec- 
tion of the county had the number in- 
stalled early this month; however, most 
telephone exchanges in the northwestern 
part of the county have yet to obtain the 
number. 

John F. Rupert, director of the 
county emergency management agency, 
said neither the "extra 9" nor a quarter 
is needed to dial the emergency number 
from pay phones on campus. 



First Week 

Information 

Briefs 

• • • 

CITY BUS PASSES 
Students who plan to ride the city 
buses this semester must have a 
validated student identification in 
order to get a discount, according 
to Mrs. JoAnn R. Fremiotti, coor- 
dinator of intramural athletics and 
College activities. 

She said no separate bus 
passes will be issued; students 
must have their student ID in 
hand to get the discount. 

• • • 
FLAG FOOTBALL 

Anyone interested in an in- 
tramural flag football tournament 
may sign up on rosters in the Col- 
lege Recreation Office, Room 
A-137, Lifelong Education 
Center. Deadline is Sept. 7. 

• • • 
BULLETIN BOARDS 
Students who want to put an- 
nouncements or notices on College 
bulletin boards must take the 
material to the College Recreation 
Office to be approved, said Mrs. 
Fremiotti, and the material will be 
posted for them. 

• • • 
RIDE BOARDS 

She said there is a "ride 
board" for students who need 
rides or who offer rides as well as 
a "classified board" for those of- 
fering for-sale items or want-to- 
buy items. Both boards are on the 
first floor of the Academic Center. 



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Monday, Aug. n, 1984 D Fmsi.DAv-oF<;ussES Issue D Spotught d S 



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Williamsport, Penna. 

Phone 326-6966 

Free French Fries 
With Sandwich of Your Choice 

Coupon expires Sept 7. 1984 



I 
I 
I 
I 



REGULAR HOURS 

6 AM MON to FRI 

6 AM 10 4 PM FRI 

REOPEN 8 P M FRI to 

5 A.M. SAT AND 

REOPEN 3 PM SAT to 

S A.M. SUN. 



Q ATTENTION LATE NIGHT CROWD! 
After the BARS try a 
Unique Breakfast Experience 
at WiWamsport's newest In Spot 

'BARRY'S Taihirik'Zt!!*, 

330-332 w 3,d SI — .w ot Ti,nd A Hn*um So 
Brooklvn — style Eatery Catering 
With This Coupon 

FREE Small Soda with Sandwich Purchase 

Coupon expires Sept. 7, 1984 



6 D SPOTLIGHT D FirsiDavof-Classes Issue □ Mondav. Aug. 27, 1984 

Vehicles must be registered 
for campus parking; security 
officer gives safety tips 



/Continued /rom Page // 
a.m. to 4 p.m., said Smeak. 
Red areas for students 

Student parking will be restricted to 
the red sticker areas - which are ade- 
quately marked, he added. Rules of the 
road prevail and regulations are strictly 
enforced, Smeak said. 

Respect others' properly 

Students are also urged to 
respect the properties which surround 
the College and not park so that 
driveways are blocked. City regulations 
for parking are strongly enforced in 
Williamsport, the supervisor noted. 
'Drinking laws' enforced 

Smeak also added that since the 
area around the College is so populated 
with students, it is "thorougjily patroll- 
ed" by the city police during the so- 
called "party hours" and stale laws in 
regard to drinking are enforced. 
Watch ilems of value 

Items of value should not be left 
"unattended" at any lime or place, the 
supervisor reminded students. If a loss 
does occur, it should be reported to the 



Security Office. Smeak observed that if 
a person's name is inscribed on an item 
(especially books), that item may be 
easier to locate. 

Know the neighbors 

Once a student has secured an 
apartment or other living quarters, he 
or she should get to know the other 
tenants or neighbors and report any 
strangers for security purposes, said 
Smeak. 

Don't travel alone 

Smeak also recommended that 
women should not travel alone at night; 
if they do, he said, they should follow a 
route which is well lighted. 



Variety of non-credit courses offered; 
scheduled to begin Tuesday, Sept. 4 



The College's Center for Lifelong 
Education is offering a wide variety of 
non-credit courses slated to begin the 
week of Tuesday, Sept. 4. 

Anyone interested in changing 

Friday deadline "'«;? "^ ^'"z^ V"^* .^'i'" °^ 'j""^/ 

•' should contact Mrs. Carol F. Kaufman, 

coordinator of campus-based activities. 
Registration can be done in person 
or by mail. Registration in person can 
be done by visiting the Student Records 
IContmued from Paxe II Office, Room 108, Academic Center 

wishes to drop a course must also check (ACC), Monday through Friday bet- 
with course instructor. ween 8 a.m. and 4:30 p.m. 

The deadline for adding classes is yhe CLE office, Room 102, ACC, 

this Friday, Aug. 31. This date is also ^ill be open Monday through Thursday 
the last date to drop a course and from 4:30 to 10 p.m. for evening 



deadline 
for adding classes; 
form required 



receive a refund. 

The last day to drop classes is Sept. 
14. Classes dropped on or after Sept. 17 
will result in the student receiving a W 
for the grade. 

Any student wanting to add credits 



registration. 

Registration is on a first-come, 
first-served basis through Sept. 4. 

Among the courses being offered 
are: 

Interior Design, a course which 



must be able to prove he or she can ^i\\ demonstrate how to coordinate col- 
satisfy [he additional credits, according o^s, patterns, and fabrics. 

~ Mixology I, a course for adults 



to the Records Office information. 



All Work-Study Students 

Mandatory Meeting 
TODAY, Monday, Aug. 27 
3:30 to 4:30 P.M. 

Academic Center Auditorium 

This meeting must be attended by 
ALL students who have been offered 
work study. 

Important forms will be distributed 
and a briefing will be given. Class excuses 
will be provided for those 
who have a class conflict. 

This meeting is mandatory. 

— The Financial Aid Office 



'Food Plan' being offered this year 
in College's new dining facility 

A three-option 'Food Plan' is be- payments will be set aside in a bank sav- 
ing offered, beginning this semester, for ings account, 
the College's new eating facility, the The Susquehanna Room was first 
Susquehanna Room in the new Lifelong introduced to the public as a "working" 
Education Center, according to John G. dining facility last Tuesday when 
Vitali, food service manager. Parents of students attending student 

Students have the choice of these orientation were invited there for mom- 
three plans: $200, for students intending ing refreshments. The Susquehanna 
to eat breakfast or lunch; $350, for Room then "officially" was opened last 
students intending to eat one or two Wednesday, 
meals daily, or $500, for students inten- The manager said students will 
ding to eat all their meals in the new have a choice of the so-called "scramble 
facility during the week. area" - a self-serve area for students 

Plan on semester basis "on 'he go" which features a salad bar, 

The plan is offered on a semester beverages, sandwiches, and soft ice 
basis and includes an 8 percent discount cream - or the regular food line. He 
for every meal purchased, according to said prices will range from $1.69 to 
Vitali. He noted that the discount is $2.79 for meals, 
derived from interest which will be The Susquehanna Room will be 

garnered because the meal plan open from 7 a.m. to 10 p.m. Mondays 
■<<::sifffim:v>s>>fff<fy-fy:m^^ thtough Thursdays; from 7 a.m. to 7 

p.m. on Fridays, and from 11 a.m. to 7 
on Saturdays and Sundays. 

The Saturday-Sunday opening is 
new this year. 

Vitali noted that "not one vending 
machine will be in the area" ~ as was 
the case in the now-defunct cafeteria 
which was in the Academic Center. 

Continuing, Vitali said those who 
join the "Food Plan" will receive a 
meal card ~ which must be used for 
every purchase. Outlining the process to 
get a meal card, he said about three 
days are needed during which informa- 
tion is sent to a coordinating bank 
which will encode the meal cards and 
send them back to the College. Each 
student will have his or her picture in- 
cluded on the meal card. 

(The Office of Intramural Athletics 
and College Activities will be responsi- 
ble for the taking of pictures. Times for 
picture-taking had not been determined 

WeeKend college There win be a $10 handling fee for 

hooinc fhic <:pntovtpr f«P'a<:in8 ^ 'o*' ™^ '=»'''' '^''^h said. 
Uegim inld iemeiier He noted that at the end of the 

semester, should a student not have us- 
ed all of his credit in the meal plan, the 
remaining money will be transferred to 
tne next semester if the student is still 
attending the College. If the student is 
withdrawing or being graduated, the re- 
maining amount will be reimbursed 
to him in full less a $10 handling" fee. 

Students have H) days irom louay 
to purchase one of the three meal plans, 
Vitali noted. He said he may be con- 
tacted at Ext. 389 for an application. 

Reviewing the operation of the new 
eating facility, Vitali said that, current- 
ly, 25 percent of the Susquehanna 
Room workers are students. He said he 
hopes to increase that percentage to 85 
as the semester progresses, to include 
student managers and students working 
their practicums for the food and 
hospitality management program. 



who want to be bartenders or more 
adept in mixing drinks. 

-- Furniture Repair and 
Refmishing, a course in which students 
will learn how to remove old finishes 
and apply new ones. 

-Auto Tune-Up and Maintenance, 
a course in which basic automotive 
checks and adjustments used for simple 
maintenance on a car are covered. 

Several courses for children are 
also offered, including Art I - in which 
the child learns to distinguish shapes 
and forms through shading, lines and 
shadow - and Rollerskating ~ in which 
the child will learn the basic skill and 
safety practices of skating. 



Report by Division Representative 

The Business and Computer 
Technologies Division has implemented 
a Weekend College during the Fall 
semester. The new programming ex- 
tends classes into the weekends ~ which 
includes hours on Friday evenings, 
Saturday, and Sunday. 

Classes offered during the Fall 
semester include Accounting I, Word 
Processing 1, Fundamentals of Com- 
puter Science, BASIC Language Pro- 
gramming, Introduction to Microcom- 
puters, Principles of Business, Small 
Business Management, and Supervision 
and Human Relations. 

Although the response to the 
Weekend College courses has been 
favorable, a few seats are available in 
several sections, according to Thomas 
C. Leitzel, assistant director of the 
Business and Computer Science Divi- 
sion. 

Additional information is available 
from Leitzel in Room 301, Academic 
Center, or by telephoning the Business 
and Computer Technologies Division, 
Ext. 225. 



Need a ride? Want to share a ride? 
Tell 'em In The SPOTLIGHT, Come to 
Room 7, ACC. to place a nollce. 



Monday. Aug. 27, 1984 D First Day-opClasses Issue D Spotuchi □ 7 



Six opportunities for part- 
time employment are available 
for students in the Williamsporl 
area and at the Lycoming Mall, 
Muncy, according to Lawrence 
W. Emery Jr., director of counsel- 
ing, career development, and 
placement. 

Sales 

At the Mall, part-time posi- 
tions are available at Waterbed 
Gallery for sales help. Interested 
persons should apply in person at 
the store. 

Also at the Mall 

Footlocker-Footwear needs 
someone to work afternoon hours, 
nights, and weekends. Interested 
persons should apply at the store 
in the Lycoming Mall. 
Sales, clerical, customer service 

Sears, Roebuck & Co. at the 
Lycoming Mall has openings in 
the sales department, a clerical 
position in the Customer Service 
area, and two credit 



S:jSA5¥:¥:¥.-¥:¥::awSSS¥::A¥:¥: 

positions. Interviews and applica- 
tions will be taken only on 
Wednesday between 10 a.m. and 5 
p.m. in the Personnel Office. 
Downtown Williamsporl 
Labels by Pulizzi Inc., 505 
Market St., downtown 
Williamsport, has openings for 
part-time employment up to 40 
hours a week, adaptable to 
schedule. Wages of $3.50 per hour 
will be paid. Interested persons 
should call Charlene Waltman or 
Shirley Shaffer any day except 
Wednesday at 326-1244. 
At Giant Plaza 
Little Caesar's Pizza in the 
Giant Plaza has openings for 
employees to answer phones, run 
cash registers and to work in the 
production line. Openings of up to 
20 hours per week, with a 
minimum-wage salary with poten- 
tial for expansion are available to 
those who call 327-8600 or stop by 
the store. 



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Telephone sales 

Persons to handle telephone 
sales are needed at Olan Mills 
Studios for two shifts; 9 a.m. to 1 
p.m., five days and every other 
Saturday, and 5 p.m. to 9 p.m. 
and every other Saturday, 9 a.m. 
to 1 p.m. The jobs pay minimum 
wage plus bonus. 

Delivery/pick-up 

Also needed by Olan Mills 
Studios are persons to deliver con- 
tracts and pick up money. In- 
terested persons must look presen- 
table, have a knowledge of the 
Williamsport area, and an 
economical car or motorcycle. 
Hours are the same as telephone 
sales and hired persons will earn 
$3 per customer. Applicants 
should call Beverly Andren at 
326-0885 or apply in person to 
Room 50, Kings Motel, South 
Williamsport. 



Jobs available 

at Lycoming Mall 

and Williamsport 

area businesses 



Practical nursing students are graduated in summer ceremony 



Courtesy College lifformalion Office 

Forty-one practical nursing 
students of the College were awarded 
certificates when graduation exercises 
were held on Friday, Aug. 17, in the 
Academic Center Auditorium. 

Barbara R. Cunning, R.N., M.A., 
assistant director of nursing at The 
Williamsport Hospital, addressed the 
students. 

Dr. Robert L. Breuder, College 
president, made opening remarks and 
awarded certificates. 

The graduating class was presented 
by Dr. Russell C. Mauch, dean of 
academic affairs, and awards were 
presented by Davie Jane Nestarick, ac- 
ting director of the Health Sciences 
Division. 

Cross country try-outs 
set for 4 p.m. tomorrow 

Students interested in trying out for 
the College cross country team will 
meet at 4 p.m. tomorrow, Tuesday, 
Aug. 28 in Room 102, Bardo Gym, ac- 
cording to Harry C. Specht, assistant 
professor of physical education. 

Additional information is available 
from Phillip D. Landers, associate pro- 
fessor of business administration and 
cross country coach, in Room 307, 
Academic Center, or by telephoning 
him at Ext. 227. 

Student handbooks available 

Student handbook-calendars, 
which list the College's extracurricular 
activities, meetings, school closing in- 
formation, policies, and so on are 
available in the Recreation Center in the 
Lifelong Education Center and in 
various locations throughout the cam- 
pus, according to Mrs. JoAnn R. 
Fremiotti, coordinator of intramural 
athletics and College activities. 



The Rev. David Joachim, Lycom- 
ing Presbyterian Church, Williamsport, 
asked the invocation and gave the 
benediction. 

Awards presented 

The Ellen Harding Berry Nursing 
Award was presented to Letitia N. Bon- 
ner, of Jersey Shore, for displaying 
outstanding scholastic achievement and 
exceptional ability in practicum 
communication skills. 

The Helen A. Smith Award was 
presented to Valerie D. Vandine, of 
Muncy RD 5, for showing extraordinary 
achievement in theory, practicum, and 
personal growth. 

Valda Jo Knight, of WiUiamsport, 
was presented the Thelma S. Morris 
Award for demonstrating outstanding 
qualities as a practical nurse in the 
clinical area. 

Graduates listed 

Members of Practical Nursing 
Class No. 42 who received certificates 
are: 

Debra Barbier, of Montgomery; 
Letitia Bonner, of Jersey Shore; Valerie 
Bryan, of Linden RD 1; Laura 
Burghard, of Tyrone. 

Jodi Bums, of Turbotville; Bar- 
bara Clark, of Trout Run RD 1; Teresa 
Crissinger, of Mill Hall, Sandra 
Crissman, of Castanea. 

Susan Cromley, of Milton RD I; 
Lori Elliott, of Lock Haven; Nancy Fry, 
of Muncy RD 2; Dena Goss, of Mc- 
Clure RD 2. 

Cheryl Hill, of Trout Run RD 1; 
Genie Howland, also of Trout Run RD 
1; Karen Hughes, of Cogan Station RD 
3; Dawn Klinger, of Trevorton. 

Diane Knepp, of McClure; Valda 
Knight, of Williamsport; Kelly Kramer, 
of Millville; Kim Levan, of Jersey Shore 
RD4. 

Ellen Lumley, of Jersey Shore; 



Joanne Messick, of Williamsport; Karen 
Miller, of Montoursville; Bonnie Myers, 
of Hughesville RD 2. 

Brenda Nelson, of Jersey Shore; 
Johna Nickerson, of Liberty RD 1; 
Margaret-Anne Otrosina, of Selin- 
sgrove; Lisa Page, of Canton. 

Vicki Phillips, of Unityville RD 1; 
Leona Pick, of Lewisburg RD 2; Tam- 
my Pick, of Mill Hall RD 1; Kuth 



Pond, of Athens RD 2. 

Lorena Route, of Roaring Branch; 
Karen Scarfo, of Williamsport; Sheri 
Schwenk, of Montoursville. 

Ellen Snook, of Loganton RD 2; 
Kathryn Stabley, of Jersey Shore; Jo- 
Anne Truax, of Covington. 

Valerie Vandine, of Muncy RD 5; 
Gail Wagner, of Jersey Shore; 
Geraldine Wyble, of Lock Haven 



See Sights and Sounds of Williamsport! 

French Settlement 
Mosquito Valley Bottle Run 

The Tow path Log Run 



MEETING FOR STUDENTS 

INTERESTEDIN W.A.C.C.'S 

CROSS-COUNTRY TEAM 

Male or Female 
Experienced or Inexperienced 



This Tuesday (Tomorrow), Aug. 28 

4 p.m. 

in 

First Floor Classroom 

of 

The Gymnasium 

Students who have questions or time conflicts. 

Contact.. 

Phil Landers 

Academic Center 

Office: Room 307 

Extension: 227 




t D SPOTUGHT a FiRSt-DAy-OF<:LASSES Issue D Mondav. Aug. 27, 1»»4 



Campus Nap< 




rransportaiJon Techrtology Offio 



Secondary Automotive 



ElectncalTechnol ogv 

TT4 

Machine Too( Techoologv 



LRC - Learning Rasourcsa Ceni»r* 

Architectural Technology 

Bookstore 

Cooperative Education, Postsecondary 

Counseling. Career Development &Plac( 



BTC - Building Trades C«nter 

Air Conditioning/ Refiigetation 
Carpentry 6 Building Constructio 
Construction Technology 
Plumbing and Heating 
Construction Technology OHica 

ADM - AdmlniBtration 
Duplicating Et Mail Services 



ACC - Academic 



Radiologic Technology 



Surgical Technology 



GS — General Services 
Dean. General Services 
Security 

W - Warehouse 

Ave - Aviation Center 

Aviation Maintenance Technology 

Aviation Technology 

ESC - Earth Science Center 



Outdoor Power Equipment 
Service & Operation of 

Heavy Construction Equipment 
Wood Products Technology 
Natural Resources Management Office 



WWAS Radio 



Dean. Academic Aflairs 

Dean. Development 
Dean, Educational Research. 
Planning 6 Evaluation 



the Gymnasium and the 
Center is through the b 
Learning Resources Center 



II Technologies Office 



Map Courtesy 
College Information Office 



Er Community Relations 



='rogram Development 



Student ID processing begins today 

Student identification cards are mandatory for each new, full or part- 
lime, student as well as returning students, according to Mrs. JoAnn R. 
Fremiotli, coordinator of intramural athletics and College activities. 

"Reluming students must get the ID validated for the Fall semester," 
she stressed and added, "Students must bring their current schedule for 
proof of identification. 

ID cards will be processed in Room 108, Bardo Gym, beginning today 
and continuing through Thursday from 9;30 a.m. to 7:30 p.m. and on Fri- 
day from 9:30 a.m. until 4 p.m. 



Artists Unlimited 
to meet next week 

Election of officers and plan- 
ning of activities for the Fall 
semester will highlight this year's 
first meeting of Artists Unlimited, 
according to Patrick D. Murphy, 
assistant professor of advertising 
art and advisor to the group. 

The meeting will be at noon 
on Tuesday, Sept. 4, in Room 4A, 
Academic Center. 



Students 

Interested 

in Joining 

The SPOTLIGHT Staff 

are invited to contact 

the advisor tomorrow, Tuesday, 

Aug. 28 

between 8 and 1 1 a.m. 

in Room 7, basement, ACC 



Library to add evening hours 
starting next week; new staff named 

The College Library will be open from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. this week 
- but will add evening hours beginning next Tuesday, Sept. 4. 

Starting next week, the Library hours will be 8 a.m. to 9 p.m., Mon- 
days through Thursdays, and 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. on Fridays. 

Mrs. Kate B. Hickey, director of the Learning Resources Center, 
reported that 100 new magazines as well as a new legal encyclopedia have 
been added to the Library's resources this year. 

She said Marilyn G. Bodnar is the new reference librarian and Sonya 
Gleason will be the library aide at the North Campus. She also said a new 
cataloguer will be hired within the month. 

Mrs. Hickey added, "We welcome the students and faculty back from 
summer vacation - and invite everyone to come in and see the look of the 
Library this year!" 



VOLUNTEERS NEEDED 

Twelve (12) students are needed to assist In running a Girl 
Scout Field Day to be held on Saturday, Sept. 29, 1984, bet- 
ween 9 a.m. and 4 p.m. Those who volunteer must attend a 
planning session on Tuesday, Sept. 11, 1984. Please contact 
Mr. Lawrence W. Emery Jr. In Room 157, Learning Resources 
Center, or call Ext. 246 and leave your name. 



Spotlight 



Vol. 20. No. 2 Tuesday. Sept. 4. 1984 8 Pages 
Williamsport Area Communily College, Williams|iorl, Pa. 17701 



IN THIS ISSUE 

Phi Beta Lambda Book Sale Page 3 

Trains, Trains, Trains Page 5 

Crossword Puzzle Returns Page 7 

Trek for Life and Breath Page 6 




LOOK RIGHT HERE - Ellen K. Snyder, computer operalor student from 
Milton, sits for photo for ID card as Brad D. Steele, construction carpentry 
student from SI. Marys, adjusts camera. fSPOTLIGHT photoj 



Secondary vocational students return tomorrow 



Eight-hundred-and-one high school 
students from 13 of the College's 20 
sponsoring school districts will be arriv- 
ing at the College tomorrow to begin 
studies in the secondary vocational pro- 
grams. 

According to Dr. William J. Mar- 
tin, director of secondary vocational 
programs, attendance has declined by 
about 100 students compared with last 
year's total. Dr. Martin said the drop is 
caused by the declining population in 



secondary schools and the reluctance of 
school districts to pay higher amounts 
for a higher number of students since 
they are trying to cut budget costs. , 
Convocation today 

The College and the sponsoring 
districts are involved in an agreement by 
which the College provides vocational 
courses for the high school students and 
the schools pay a certain amount per 
student. 

Convocation is to be held today for 



the faculty who are teaching the 15 pro- 
grams, which are auto body, auto 
mechanics, aviation, carpentry, draf- 
ting, electrical occupations, forestry, 
health assistant, machine shop, 
masonry, small engine repair, welding, 
horticulture, cosmetology, and quantity 
foods production and service. 
Most locations the same 
The director noted that the last 
program is new this year, and students 
will be working out of the new Lifelong 



Education Center. He added that 
classrooms and labs have remained in 
the same location, except for drafting, 
which moved from the Administration 
Building to 2I7A, LEC. 

The College has updated and pur- 
chased equipment for the program over 
the past year from a $162,000 grant 
from the Appalachian Regional Com- 
mission, Dr. Martin said. Some of the 
major purchases were a new greenhouse 
Please turn to page 8 



Sigma Phi Omega ID card processing continues this week 



sets first meeting 
for next week 

The first meeting of Sigma Phi 
Omega will be held at 1 p.m. this 
Thursday in the student conference cor- 
ner of the Susquehanna Room for in- 
terested students, according to Mrs. Vi- 
vian P. Moon, associate professor and 
coordinator of the dietetic program. 

She said the purpose of the 
organization and its future goals are to 
"serve the College community and to 
provide opportunities for members to 
grow vocationally as well as socially." 

Reflecting upon past activities and 

accomplishments, she said the club has 

had a"mixer" (dance) for new students. 

Please turn to Page 8 



Student identification card process- 
ing will continue this week, according 
to Mrs. JoAnn R. Fremiotti, coor- 
dinator of intramural athletics and Col- 
lege activities ~ who also listed the uses 
for the ID cards. 

New, full-time, part-time, and 
returning students should get their IDs 
validated or revalidated in Room USA, 
Lifelong Education Center (LEC), 

Photos for new IDs will then be 
taken in the Recreation Center next 
door. 

Processing times are 9:30 a.m. to 
7:30 p.m. on Monday through Thurs- 
day and 9:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Friday. 
"Students must bring their 
schedules for verification purposes 
whether they are getting new IDs or 
having their present ones revalidated for 



the Fall semester," said Mrs. Fremiotti. 

"The replacement fee for a lost ID 
card is $10," she added. 
Uses outlined 

Mrs. Fremiotti explained the 
various uses a student ID card can be 
put to: 

Students on the College meal plan 
use their ID card as a meal card. 

The Williamsport Bureau of 
Transportation provides a special dis- 
count fare of 25 cents to students who 
show their ID card to a city bus driver. 

An ID card is needed to enter the 
gymnasium and use the equipment in 
the evening during intramurals 



"Students also need the card to use 
the equipment in the Recreation 
Center," Mrs. Fremiotti said. 

The ID card can also be used as a 
library card for borrowing books from 
the College library. Furthermore, an 
ID is a free or reduced rate ticket to 
special activities on campus, including 
Monday night movies, concerts, dances, 
rollerskating, Ice skating, skiing, and 
other social events. 

Finally, Mrs. Fremiotti added that 
an ID card is good for as long as a stu- 
dent is at the College. However, they 
should be revaKdated each semester, she 
said 



Flag football league being formed; 
co-ed, women's, men's teams wanted 



A three-division intramural flag 
football league is being formed, accor- 
ding to Glen I. Korobov, Colfege even- 
ing activities assistant. 

Anyone interested - men, women 
~ may pick up the registration forms as 
well as rules and regulations in Room 
108, Bardo Gym, between 4 and 10 
p.m., Monday through Friday. 

The forms must be turned in by 
this Friday, Sept. 7, Korobov said. 

The three divisions will be: an all- 
male division, an all-female division and 



a co-ed division. 

The game is not structuered for the 
high-powered play that most people are 
used to in order to get fair competition 
between all players involved, said 
Korobov. 

Each team is required to field eight 
players, but if it should arise that a 
team has only seven players then with 
the consent of the opposing team and of 
the officials that team will be granted 
permission to play with one less than 
the required number, added Korobov. 



Outing Club needs active 
participation, advisor says 

"Active participation" is the key ingredient that Steven T. 
McDonald, advisor of the Outing Club, said he is looking for in 
students interested in joining the club. 

McDonald, who is the College's media technician, has scheduled 
this semester's first meeting of the Outing Club for 4 p.m. tomorrow 
in Room 218, Academic Center. 

The club is "student-run", McDonald emphasized, and ac- 
tivities include backpacking, camping, museum trips, field trips to 
various park sites and participation in local outdoor events. 

The advisor added that if not enough student interest is shown 
in the club, the organization will "fold". 



SW:¥:¥:¥:SW:SSS 



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2 SPOTLIGHT Tuesday, Sept. 4, 1984 

Point and 

'Growing pains' experienced 

Scuffle over Ferraro's tax return 
is 'microcosm' of political arena 

SPOTLIGHT commentary 

There has been quite a storm of controversy surrounding Dennocratic vice 
presidential candidate Geraldine Ferraro and her financial dealings. On July 
24 Ms. Ferraro made a campaign promise to release her and husband John 
Zaccaro's income tax returns to the public. Zaccaro balked, causing a delay 
that put a lot of heat on his wife. 

Many people believe that none of this vifould have happened if Ms. Ferraro 
were not a woman. 

That is a correct assumption. 

Having a female vice presidential candidate Is a new experience for the 
American public. Despite the fact that society is changing to allow females 
their rightful place, change occurs slowly. This situation is a microcosm of that 
change. We accept the woman candidate, (which is not that difficult, given the 
Democrat's chances in November), yet we carefully scrutinize both her and 
her spouse's lives for any unusual detail. 

Political activity has always been influenced by the people involved and 
the events surrounding them. Ivls Ferraro is new to the American public. She 
is the first female major-party vice-presidential candidate. In a novel situation, 
there will be happenings that have never before occured. Men have always 
been at the political forefront because of our social structure. As this male- 
dominated structure changes, there will be "growing pains" for the public and 
the parties involved. 



counterpoint 

Candidate treated 'unethically' 

Ferraro unfairly scrutinized 
only because of her gender 

SPOTLIGHT commentary 

It's high time for people to grow up! In this election year we have our first 
woman vice president candidate-elect. The fact that she is a woman who is in- 
dependent, self-supporting and successful in her career has put her in a posi- 
tion to be bombarded with chauvanistic requests. The fact that she was asked 
to have her husband's business finances made public was unethical enough. 
However, the requests didn't end there. Both she and her husband were also 
asked to reveal their income tax forms. 

According to the Law of Ethics, passed in 1976, all candidates are re- 
quired to file annual reports showing their outside income, assets, and 
liabilities. Also required is disclosure of a spouse's PERSONAL finances 
unless rigid criteria for exemption are met. Under the law of ethics, release of 
tax returns are not required. 

When asked to make a financial disclosure and reveal her income tax 
returns, Ms. Ferraro said she was more than willing. However, the issue of her 
finances would never had become so news-worthy had the vice presidential 
candidate's name been John Zaccaro instead of Geraldine Ferraro, 

After all, did anyone question Lady Bird Johnson or Jaqueline Kennedy 
about their wealth and assets while their spouses were running for office? 



Falling in love... comnnercially 



Book commentary 
By Karen M. Metarko 
Of The SPOTLIGHT Staff 

Chestnut ringlets of hair, doe- 
shaped eyes, creamy white skin satin 
to the touch,,, an unseen, throaty- 
voiced male Introducing you to a televi- 
sion commercial for soap? Accurate 
guess. 

But also the introduction into a 
form of literature that somehow has ad- 
dicted thousands of women, and 
possibly men, into purchasing more 
and more of the product. Not soap, but 
"soap literature." 

Not professed here are years of 
knowledge of this "genre" of writing. 
But with only mistakingly taking one 
foray into one of these books, I've had 
my fill. 

Addicted reader 

Romance I am not condemning, 
nor writers actually making a living 
from their craft. But to think that 
readers who have enjoyed centuries of 
brilliant prose have evolved into a 
massive, marketable audience that 
thirsts for these monotonously-written 
paperbacks. Is enough to make a 
writer striving for professionalism 
retch. 

Classic example 

Take, for instance, the lengthy 
work Sweer Torment - the title alone 
signifies what is in store. In order to 
find the ending for this poor excuse for 
wasting paper, one must wade through 
ridiculous decscriptions of how an In- 
nocent maiden is enchanted by a virile, 
masculine man, who one minute is en- 
chanted with her, and by the next 
page, is seething with rage at her. This 
tug-of-war between the characters 
wears on for 300 pages, while also 
wearing on the reader's patience. But, 
in the end, all is forgiven and the com- 
passionate couple are enslaved to 
each other forever. And all that 



nonsense, for a boy-calches-girl-with- 
no-plot story. 

There is one advantage that I have 
become well aware of after polishing 
off my first - and last- romantic novel. 
Since they are paperbacks, they are so 
much easier to politely enter into File 
13 than hard-cover. 



TV movies go to the dogs 



TV commentary 

By Sandra R. Taylor 

Of The SPOTLIGHT Staff 

The "CBS Late Night Movies" 
have hit a definite low in programming. 
A vivid indication of this was evident 
during the recently-shown movie 
"C.H.O.M.P.S.", which featured a 



computerized dog which was to act as 
a security system. The movie turned 
technoloy into an unwitty, mundanely- 
predicatable comedy. 

It is advised that "night-owls" take 
a good book in hand before "tuning in" 
to these tasteless movies. 



Students' futile search for clocks 
raises tinnely inquiries 

SPOTLIGHT commentary 

Time could be generally considered the master of all working adults. Peo- 
ple have scheduled routines of work-time and free-time. Any appointment or 
meeting involves being in a certain place at an exact hour. Assigned job tasks 
may have deadlines attached to them. Throughout the world, at this very mo- 
ment, human beings are eating, sleeping, working, playing, or reproducing in 
their respective time zones. In other words, we live "round the clock," 

A recent examination of the Academic Center uncovered fascinating 
possibilities in lime travel. The hallways and quite a few classrooms were 
eerie, shapeless areas where time did not exist (there were no clocks). Enter- 
ing Room 327 was a leap into the unknown (the clock was one and a half hours 
fast, and Room 303 brought back fond memories of "way-back-when"' (the 
clock was one hour and 20 minutes slow). There were variations on this 
theme throughout the campus. 

What has happened to the College"s clocks? Are they being replaced 
with new ones or simply eliminated for some reason? If the current situation 
remains in vogue, what are the consequences for students and faculty 
members'? Will a professor in a classroom happily drone on, unaware of the 
time elapsing, thereby making himself and his students late for upcoming 
classes or other appointments? Whatever the case may be, the problem of 
"'clock confusion" is ticking away (except for the Academic Center hallways 
where it isn't ticking at all) and needs immediate correction. 



You Can Help Conserve 

Our Natural Resources 

...turn off lights when room is not in 

use... use only the water you need; 

don't leave it running... 



SPOTLIGHT 

Vol, 20. No, 2 

Tuesday, Sept, 4, 1964 

ana 

The SPOTLIGHT Is publlslied each 
Monday of the academic year, except 
for official College holidays, by jour- 
nalism and other interested students. 
Opinions expressed do not represent 
the official opinion of the College, 

Office: Room 7, Academic Center, 
Wiillamsport Area Community College, 
1005 W. Third St., Wiillamsport, Pa, 
17701. Telephone: (717) 326-3761, Ext, 
221, 

D n D 

The SPOTLIGHT Is a member ol 
the Columbia Scholastic Press 
Association. 

D a D 

STAFF 
Donna M. Barnett, managing editor; 
Karen M. Metarko, editorial page editor; 
Rodney D. Hill, sports editor; Qlsela D, 
Grassley. photography editor; Mark S. 
Schwanke, administrative affairs 
editor; James K. Morrlssey, student af- 
fairs editor; Kathryn M. Gilbert, adver- 
tising director. 

SlaH Writers: Kathleen L. Eiswert, 
Denlse Y. Enlgk, Roxanne A, Goodler, 
Richard E, Kopp Jr,, Robert W, Minler, 
Anne T, Morateill, Sandra L. Musgrave, 
Andrew C, Sutryn, Judith L, Swinehart, 
Sandra H. Taylor, LeRoy S, Whitmire 
Jr,, Jennifer s. White, Canda M. ZInck. 

nan 

Production Staff This Issue 
Rodney D. Hill, production super- 
visor; Richard E. Kopp Jr,, vldeocom- 
positlon operator; Donna M, Barnett, 
copy editor; Andrew C, Sutryn, senior 
production assistant; Judith L, 
Swinehart, Kathryn M. Qilbert, and 
Canda M. ZInck, production assistants. 



August: Pennsylvania's first lady 
-Mrs. Ginny Thornburgh - 
returned to the Main Campus to 
tour a building Jar which she had 
broken ground in 1982. Accom- 
panied by Dr. Robert L. Breuder, 
College president, Mrs. Thorn- 
burgh viewed the Lifelong Educa- 
tion Center. [Courtesy photo) 



Phi Beta Lambda s^-^mer highlights. 
now holding 
book sale 

Phi Beta Lambda (PBL) is holding 
its semi-annual book sale, according to 
Paul W. Goldfeder, assistant professor 
of business administration. 

Returning students have the oppor- 
tunity to bring in any used books for the 
sale. The sale is underway in Room 3 of 
the Academic Center and will continue 
for approximately 24 days. 

A member of the club will be pre- 
sent to assist students. 

Dietetic technician 
students plan sale 
of health snacks 

Dietetic technicians students will be 
selhng "healthful" snacks from 9 a.m. 
to 3 p.m. this Wednesday in the lounge 

t%rtMot'aZa'r Counselor details services 

fessor and coordinator of the dietary 
"program. 

Edibles will include juices, fruit, 
cheeseballs and cheesesticks. "We're 
not sure about baked items," Mrs. 
Moon noted. 

Funds collected will aid the techni- 
cians who are planning to take a trip to 
Washington, D.C. in October. While 
there, they will attend a national 
.meeting of the American Dietetic 
Technicians Association. 

Catering to be discussed 
at meeting this afternoon 

The first meeting of persons involv- 
ed in the food and hospitality manage- 
ment curriculum will be held at I p.m. 
today in Room I45B to the rear of the 
Susquehanna Room in the Lifelong 
Education Center, according to Mrs. 
Vivian P. Moon, associate professor 
and coordinator of the dietary program. 

Catering projects will be discussed. 



ToeMtaj, Sepl. 4,. 1984 SPO^ 3 




available for special needs students 



Special services are available for 
handicapped students enrolled at the 
College, according to Kathryn A. Fer- 
rence, counselor for special needs 
students. 

She said individuals needing 
assistance and/or those desiring to 
determine if they are eligible for these 
services should contact her as soon as 
possible. 

Ms. Ferrence works closely with 
the Office of Vocational Rehabilitation, 
Blindness and Visual Services as well as 
key offices on campus to secure 
assistance for handicapped students, she 
said. 

Services can include, she added, 
personal, vocational and educational 



counseling, tape-recorded textbooks, 
extended testing time, notetaker servies, 
attendants, and so on. 

Ms. Ferrence's office is in Room 
157 of the Learning Resources Center. 
Her telephone extension is 246. 

Ms. Ferrence said she is also 
available for consultation with faculty 
members who have handicapped 
students enrolled in their courses. 



Dark meat of turkeys has more 
calories than white meat. 



In 1918, 
million deaths. 



influenza caused 20 



Babe Ruth broke his own record of 
60 home runs in 1927. 



W.A.C.C. 
BUS SCHEDULE 



TIME 

7:15 
9:15 
10:IS 
1:05 

4:00 
5:00 

3:00 
4:00 



3:00 
4:00 



DESTINATION 

Leave LearniDg Resources, go lo Natural Resources 
Leave Natural Resources, go lo Learning Resources 
Leave Learning Resources, go to Natural Resources 
Leave Natural Resources, go lo Learning Resources 
MONDAY, WEDNESDAY, THURSDAY 
Leave Learning Resources, go to Natural Resources 
Leave Natural Resources, go to Learning Resources 

TUESDAY ONLY 
Leave Learning Resources, go to Natural Resources 
Leave Natural Resources, go lo Learning Resources 

FRIDAY ONLY 
Leave Learning Resources, go to Natural Resources 
Leave Natural Resources, go to Learning Resources 



Note: There is a/ee. Pay S3 a day or $50 per semesier lo lake llie bus. Additional information 
is available at Cashier's Office, Academic Center (Exi. 292). 



Some textbooks still not 
available at Bookstore 

Some textbooks were still not 
available late last week at the College 
Bookstore because of late orders, accor- 
ding to Mrs. Eleonore R. Holcomb, 
Bookstore supervisor. 

Not available are books for ENL 
111-03 and 06; ENL 121-26; ENL 
111-21 and 24; CSC 125; HSR 261-25; 
SOC 231-01 and 25, and Center for 
Lifelong Education's Computer Literacy 
4016-01. 

A sign will be put in the Bookstore 
window lo update availability 



^1 



ABC Bowling Lanes 
College League 

sign-ups 

Men. Women, or Mixed 
Four Persons per Team 

Sign up at the Lanes 
on Tuesday, Sept. 11 

League starts at 4 p.m. 
Tuesday, Sept. 18 




4 SPOTLIGHT Tuesday, Sept. 4, 1984 




> SUMMER HIGHLIGHTS:: 



*| Dr. Cunning takes 
I post in Arizona 



May: A I year's end, Arthur D. 
Fry, 1160 W. Third St., was 
selected Landlord of the Year - 
for the second consecutive year 
The landlord contest was spon- 
sored by the Student Government 
Association and involved 
nomination by students who were 
tenants of Fry's and ultimate 
selection based on reasons they 
gave. [SPOTLIGHT pholoj 



Practical nursing program revised; new equipment added 

A few changes have been made in Prior to this change, which was approv- 

the College practical nursing program ed by the College Board of Trustees and 

this year, according to Ms. Linda the State Board of Nurse Examiners, 

Falchek-Clark, coordinator of practical practical nursing students attended 

nursing. classes for a 12-month period which 

For the first time, students enrolled began in either August or March. 
in the nursing program will attend The size of each nursing class was 

classes for three regular semesters. also reduced from 68 to 30 students. 



Younger Scholars Program offers 
grants for research/writing projects 



Guidelines and application forms Students taking part in the pro- 

for the Younger Scholars Program of gram will receive a stipend of $1,800 

the National Endowment for the and will be expected to work for nine 

Humanities now are available in th^In- weeks during the Summer of 1985. The 

legraled Studies Division Office, Room work will be completed under the close ^, .,..„„.^.„„ ,„„w 

211, Academic Center, according to supervision of a humanities professor vacated by""the""resi'^"atiOT oF Dr 

Russell C. Mauch, who was appointed 



Dr. Charles J. Cunning, associate 
dean of educational services will soon be 
taking a new job as vice president for in- 
structional services at Central Arizona 
College, Coolidge, Ariz. 

He reported last week that his last 
day at the College will be tomorrow. 
He will begin his new duties on Sept. 15. 

Dr. Cunning spoke about the 
benefits of the community college 
system: "I think community colleges 
will continue to make higher education 
available to all people. The community 
college represents the first time educa- 
tion has been within reach of the middle 
and middle-lower classes." 

"Four-year schools are formulated 
by the Cambridge system of England. 
There are two things you need for that 
~ money and high scores on standardiz- 
ed tests. The community college has an 
open door policy. It says, 'give me all 
different types of people.' A person 
doesn't need a lot of money or to have 
high test scores," Dr. Cunning explain- 
ed. 

He said that he himself would have 
attended a community college if the 
community college system had been 
available to him at the time he was pur- 
suing an education. 

Dr. Mauch resigns as dean; 
Dr. Middleton appointed to post; 
Mrs. Muzic named acting director 



With money received from House 
Bill 177, which increases funding for 
community colleges, Ms. Falchek-Clark 
said the nursing program obtained new 
"state of the art" equipment for a new 
nursing arts lab - including all electric 
beds with siderails. 



Dr. James E. Middleton, who has been director of the Integrated Studies 
Division, has been named dean of academic affairs, according to Mrs. Veronica 
M. Muzic, professor of English, who has been named acting director of the divi- 
sion. 



Dr. Middleton takes the position 



Lawrence E. Emery Jr., director of who will also receive a stipend for 
counseling, career development, and overseeing the independent study pro- 
placement, gram. 

The program will award up to 100 Deadline for application is Oct. 15. 

grants nationally to students under 21 to Watercolorist to open 

conduct their own research and writing Fall season at Brown Library 



projects in such fields as history, 
philosophy, and the study of literature. 
Recipients may not have received a 
bachelor's degree, or expect to receive 
one within two months of the comple 
tion of a Younger Scholars grant, accor 



Phi Beta Lambda 
membership drive 
begins tomorrow 

n u u J . . 1 ,u ■■■ Offical recruiting for Phi Beta 

Dr. Mauch resigned to take he position Lambda (PBL) will begin tomorrow and 
of vice president of instrucUon at end on Friday, Sept. 14. 



dean of academic affairs in 1982 after 
having served as the chief administrator 
for the Center for Lifelong Education. 



The Fall art exhibit season at the Brookhaven College, Farmers Branch 

James V. Brown Library in downtown Texas. 

Williamsport will be launched by Carol Mrs. Muzic will remain acting divi- „ j nj /- ur j 

Slusser Fraind of Berwick water- sion director "until a replacement can ^?T *' G^'ife''"- assistant professor 

colorist, with an opening tera from 2 to be found - hopefully by January," Dr. °' ''"/'""^ administration; Miss Valane 

.. , . , ,• f ■ u . K .. '' ?•■"■ 'his Saturday in the library's Middleton said. ^- ."^^''^^J^; coordinator of the in- 

ding to information furnished by the Community Room. Dr. Middleton said he found the dividualized learning center, or Thomas 

National Endowment for the The exhibit will remain on view change of his position an opportunity to ^-Leitzel, assistam director of Business 



Applications are available at the 
PBL office or students may contact 



throughout September. 



Looking for good reading, but shocked by new book prices? 
Come to... 

The Last Hurrah Bookshop 

937 Memorial Aye. 

(I bik. north o/4lh St.. bel. 4lh £ 5lh Ave.) 

•Most Paperbacks SO" - 75' •Hardbacks $1.00/up 
Over 15,000 books... Check our selection for your books! 

Open Wed. and Fri. 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. 



work in a broader range of issues. "It's *"'' Computer Science Division, 
(his new job) an opportunity to focus on Iiiterested persons may also con- 
broader areas and to support the growth 'ae' the club officers: president, 
of this institution." Jonathan Miller, computer science stu- 

During his tenure as division direc- dent from Williamsport; vice president, 
tor, the name of the division was chang- ^"^d Bogenrief, computer science slu- 
ed from Communications, Humanities, dent from Avis; secretary, Elizebeth 
and Social Sciences to its present name. Bogenrief, medical secretary student 

According to Mrs. Muzic, the f™"" Avis; treasurer, Tina Poust, ac- 

change of the division name was the counting student from Hughesville, or 

result of a "reorganization to make one administative aide, Judy Brokaw, com- 

administrative unit for core courses for P"'er science student from Canton, 
all students." 



HAMILTON HOUSE SHARING SERVICE 

For Details Call... 
322-3075 



Taesday, Sept. 4, 1984 SPOTLIGHT 5 



Landlord of the Year 

title-holder also an avid 

model train collector 



LaRue C. Shempp invites 
students to visit museum 



A man who was a former landlord 
for College students has also donated 40 
years of his life toward building one of 
the most famous model train collections 
in the country. 

LaRue C. Shempp, 72, of 325 
Lundy Drive, is a Williamsport native 
and a lover of both model and prototype 
trains. His collection spans 323 complete 
train outfits, including a full-scale model 
of the Orient Express, a European 
section and trains from the famous-name 
makes of Lionel, American Flyer, and 
Ives. 

Shempp, who retired in 1974 after 36 
years as a senior caseworker with the 
Lycoming County Board of Assistance, 
sold his collection two years ago to the 
Williamsport Foundation and in June of 
last year moved the collection from his 
residence to the Lycoming County 
Historical Society Museum at 858 W. 
Fourth St. (across from Ways Garden). 



Offers come from California 

The model train collector stated that 
he had offers from as far as California 
for his expansive collection but he 
wanted to keep the trains in the local 
area to be enjoyed, adding that the 
collection is "quite a publicity eye- 
catcher". 

Shempp noted that the collection has 
been the feature of many newspaper 
stories as well as radio and television 
broadcasts and is part of a published 
work entitled "Toy Train Treasury, Vol. 
IL The LaRue Shempp Collection", 
published by Iron Horse Productions, of 
Pittsburgh. Shempp has also been the 
subject of a 30-minute documentary 
produced in State College and shown on 
public television. 

"I love to ride trains, but I've never 
worked on one," continued Shempp. 
Still, he is a member of the planning 
committee for the Lycoming County 
Chamber of Commerce which organized 
the Susquehannock train excursion over 
the summer. Shempp explained that the 
Susquehannock was a passenger train in 
the 1950s and 1960s which ran from 
WilUamsport to Philadelphia on a four- 
hour excursion on a daily basis. The 
Chamber of Commerce revived the excur- 
sion and will be sponsoring another like 
event in October. 




TRAINS, TRAINS - LaRue C. Shempp points out a part of his model (rain 
colleclion which now is on display at the Lycoming County Historical Society 
Museum, on West Fourth Street a few blocks away from Main Campus. In- 
cluded in the photo are standard gauge trains. One of the highlights of the col- 
lection is the No. 1 Gauge German Train, on loan from President Ronald 
Reagan. (SPOTLIGHT Photo by Giseta D. Grassley) 



He'd be happy to give tour 

The train collection is displayed in 
the basement meeting room of the 
museum, and its creator conducts lours 
two to three times a week. Shempp said 
he would be happy to give tours to those 
from the College, in coordination with 
the museum. 

If a student would like to view the 
impressive collection alone or with a few 
others, the museum hours are 9:30 a.m. 
to 4 p.m., Monday through Saturday, 
and 1:30 p.m. to 4 p.m. on Sunday. 

According to museum personnel, the 
organization does not include any student 
rates in their admission fee range, but it 
was noted that 50 cents will be taken off 
each individual's cost if a group of 10 or 
more persons plan to tour the museum. 

Fees are as follows: Adults, $2; 
senior citizens, $1.50; children under 12, 
$1, and two adults with any number of 
children, $5. Additional information is 
available by telephoning 326-3326. 



Over $100,000 invested in colleclion 

The collector noted that he just pur- 
chased a German toy train collection, 
but stated that he will use it to collect 
about 20 to 25 sets to display in his 
home. 

Shempp estimated that he has in- 
vested over $100,000 to complete the col- 
lection. 

He also gives lectures about his pro- 
ject to church groups and local agencies. 
This includes a 55-minute slide presenta- 
tion ~ most of which was taken when 
the collection was at his home. 

From 1965 to 1982, Shempp was 
manager of a rooming house for male 
students. He was named the Landlord 
of the Year in 1980 by nomination and 
selection by students. 



By Karen M. Metarko 
Of The SPOTLIGHT Staff 



6 SPOTLIGHT Tuesday, Sept. 4, 1984 



Students invited to join fourth 'Trek for Life and Breath' 



Officials of the Central Penn- 
sylvania Lung and Health Association 
have extended an invitation to College 
students to participate in the fourth an- 
nual, three-day "Trek for Life and 
Breath," on Friday, Saturday, and 
Sunday, Oct. 5, 6 and 7. 

The outdoor hike coincides with 
the start of the foliage season and its 
purpose it to colled funds for the 
association's programs for Lycoming 
and Clinton County residents. 

Begins al Angel Falls 

According to Steve McDonald, 
media technician and advisor of the 
Outing Club, the trek commences at 
Angel Falls on the Loyalsock Trail and 
ends at World's End State Park, 
Forksville, Sullivan County. McDonald 
noted that some of last year's Outing 
Club members participated. 

According to Nancy Cooley, a 
volunteer working for the trek commit- 
tee, a participant must have a minimum 
of $150 in pledges to enter. The pledges 
will not be according to an amount 
pledged per mile, but will be a general 
donation. And after the trek, the 
association collects the pledges and 
alleviates the job from the participant, 
she noted. 

Prizes lo be awarded 

All participants will receive a 
T-shirt and a patch, and the lop three 
prizes are a pair of Timberland boots, a 
backpack and a $100 gift certificate 
from Nippenose, a sporting goods store 
at 231 W. Fourth St. in downtown 



Williamsport. 

The volunteer further noted that 
those who receive $400 worth of pledges 
will have their names entered into a con- 
test sponsored by Pan-Am Airlines. 
Two to be selected 

Two names will be selected from 
the state's central district region, and 
the airline will pay for the winners to be 
flown to any trek they would like to be 
involved in within the country and will 
pay for their pledge requirement. 

Food, including barbecued chicken 
and other picnic foods, will be provided 
by the association and the Lycoming 
County Civil Defense Department, it 
was noted, and participants will need 
their own "trekking" equipment for the 
event. 



The trekkers will begin covering a 
part of their 25-mile hike around 2 p.m. 
Friday at Camp Lycogis in Hillsgrove, 
on Route 87, 25 miles north of Mon- 
toursville. Four miles of the surroun- 
ding area will be covered that afternoon 
and the group will camp at the site and 
officially start the trek Saturday morn- 
ing. 

Miss Cooley stated the trek has 
been organized this way for those who 
cannot come Friday due to other obliga- 
tions, such as school or work, and 
therefore the entire group can stay 
together. 

Pace is 'easy' 

Miss Cooley noted that she realized 
that most people are not experienced 
hikers, but she termed the terrain and 



the trek's pace as "easy." 

Orientation sessions to prepare for 
the trek will be held at 2 p.m., Sept. 8 
and 22 in the community room at the 
Lycoming Mall, Muncy, the volunteer 
added. 

This Saturday's session will focus 
on information about the trek and how 
to get into shape, and the latter session 
will feature wilderness survival techni- 
ques and tips on packing gear. 

The committee woman said that 
Sept. 24 is the deadline for registration. 

According to association officials, 
about 30 persons participated in last 
years's trek, netting over $4,000. 

Further information is available at 
the Lung Association office, 531 W. 
Fourth St., or telephone 322-3704. 




June: Lifelong Education Center 
was dedicated during ceremony 
which included city, county, state, 
and national figures. The building 
dedication was in honor of State 
Sen. Henry G. Hager "in ap- 
preciation of his many contribu- 
tions to the College". At podium 
in photo is Mario Caldera, chair- 
man of the College Board of 
Trustees. The new building was 
ready for the Fall opening. It in- 
cludes 81,957 square feet and cost 
$6.5 million to build. 
[SPOTLIGHT pholol 




fl 



\ 




Whaddya' 
say...? 



MARK D. FLYNN 



KARL F. ZIERLE MARJORY COOPER JOHN C. MORRIS 




LOR! C. STASIAK 



Mark D. Flynn, broadcasting stu- 
dent Ironn Soutti Williamsport: "The 
food is expensive. The atmosphere is 
fantastic, but there's no clock in the 
room." 



CLYDE W. MAZZA BETSY D. FOLLMER 



Karl F, Zierle. industrial drafting 
student from Williamsport; "The room 
is organized and set up well. The food 
is suitable " 



Marjory D. Cooper, food and hop- 
sitality management student from 
vi/illiamsport: "The organization of the 
room is great. The room is beautiful. 
What I have tasted js, good. I. like it;' but I like it. 



Question: What is your opinion of tt]e 
Susquehanna Room: Its organization 
and lood? 
Location: Susquehanna Room 

Ptiotos by Giseia D. Grassiey 

interviews by RIcliard E. Kopp Jr. 

Both of the SPOTLIGHT Staff 

John C. Morris, individual studies 
student from Eagles Mere: "I am not 
impressed; the room needs a clock 
and vending machines so I do not have 
to wait in line for a half-hour to get a 
drink. I do feel the room is 
comfortable." 

Lori C. Stasiak, accounting stu- 
dent from Lopez; "The food is all right. 
I like the music but is could be louder." 

Steve T, Linn, business manage- 
ment student from Mill Hall; The food is 
great and cheap. Beautiful room. I like 
the design. It is a little crowded." 

Clyde W, Mazza, business 
management from Lock Haven: "Ter- 
rific.,, great!" 

Betsy D. Follmer, computer 
science operator student from South 
Williamsport; "It is a nice room, I have 
only eaten salads and had soft drinks. 



Involvement encouraged for student 
organizations, student government 

"Anyone interested in a student organization, intramural athletics or be- 
ing a representative to the Student Government Association (SGA) is en- 
couraged to become involved," said Mrs. JoAnn R. Fremiotti, coordinator of 
intramnral athletics and College activities. 

"I wDI direct those who are interested to the appropriate advisors or stu- 
dent leaders, she remarked. 

Mrs. Fremiotti is available for farther informalion in Room 108, Bardo 
Gym, or at Ext. 2(9. 




STILL SEEMS LIKE SUMMER ~ Warm, and sometimes humid, weather 
during the first week of classes lured students and others to the outdoors, in- 
cluding the steps and lawns of the Academic Center last week for "just 
loungin' " or a bit of frisbee, or reading... /SPOTLIGHT pholoj 



Student restaurant being readied 
to serve first evening meals Sept. 17 



Tuesday, Sept. 4, 1984 SPOTLIGHT 7 



Students involved in "Creative Kit- 
chen" ~ the student resturant - now 
are making preparations for their first 
evening meal which is shceduled to be 
offered from 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. on 
Monday, Sept. 17, according to Mrs. 
Vivian P. Moon, associate professor 
and coordinator of the dietary program. 

The menu will include a choice of 
soup or salad and fresh bread. The en- 



tree is served with a vegetable, a "starch 
food", and beverage. Dessert a la carte 
concludes the meal. 

Price per meal is $3.50 plus 
dessert. 

Mrs. Moon added that the student 
restaurant will be serving meals every 
Monday evening from 5:30 p.m. to 6:30 
p.m. through December. 



f THE BENSON ^ 



Offl mini, ^ 
fBMnmarket 



Corner of Srd and Maynard Sts. 



Gas 
Snacks 



Groceries 
Tobacco 



'^ 



Always Open Nights, Sundays, and Holidays 



J 



ACROSS 

1 Soaks up 
5 Part ol 

fireplace 
9 Ouije 

12 Nobleman 

13 Comtorl 

14 Guide's high 

15 Body ot Boy 
17 Or\e-base 

19 Brags 

21 Booty 

22 Succor 

24 River in 
llaly 

25 Chicken 

26 Beverage 

27 Individual 
29 College 

degree abbr 

31 Male sheep 

32 Babylonian 

33 Conjunction 

34 Algonquian 

36 Recluse 

38 Iransrix 

39 Armed 
conflict 

40 Man's 
nickname 

41 Detest 

42 Mischievous 
44 Female 

relative 
46 Deprived of 

46 Consumed 

51 Anger 

52 Part of foot 

54 Frenzy 

55 Youngster 

56 Girls name 

57 Winter pre- 
cipitation 



DOWN 

1 Deposit 

2 Paddle 

3 DiHiculty 

4 Sailing vessel 

5 Compass 
point 

6 Head of 
church parish 

7 Egyptian 
goddess 

8 Number 

9 Criminal 

10 Butler 
substitute: 
colloq- 

1 1 Time gone by 
16 Parent: 

colloq. 
18 Secluded 

valley 
20 Dance 

22 Rabbit 

23 Verve 



CROSS 
WORD 
PUZZLE 

Answers, page 8 



25 \ 



29 Badger 

30 Skin ailmeni 
34 Undaunted 

36 Nimbus 

37 Earliest 



41 Listens to 

42 Redact 

43 Girl's name 

44 Sow 

45 Symbol (or 
tellurium 

47 Pronoun 
49 The self 






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8 SPOTLIGHT Tuesday, Sept. 4, 1984 





IN THE CORNER POCKET - Billiard tables in the new Recreation Center in 
the Lifelong Education Center were popular last week. Among those "in ac- 
tion" last week were Steve 1. Kline, of Carrolltown; David D. Sell, also of 
Carrolltown; Gary L. Miller, of Houtsdale; Robert J. Murphy, of Towanda; 
Robert Natarian, of Barnesboro; Danny L. Fish, of Elkland, and Tbad J. 
Riley, of Johnstown. fSPOTLlGHT pholo/ 

Recreation Center hours listed; 
additional games being considered 



MOVIN' ON IN - Douglas E. Hoffman, electrical occupations student 
(right), and Ronald G. Lindsey, building technologies student, typified 
many students the week before last as they toted boxes and moved into 
rented quarters. Both are from Franklin. ISPOTUGHT pholoj 



Secondary vocational students return 



Continued from Page I 
for the horticulture department, a 
computer-assisted drafting design sta- 
tion (CAM) for the drafting depart- 



rr 



i^ Cillo's 

Cx»llege Corner 

We'll prepare your 
favorite Subs and Burgers 
ttie way you like them! 



Play LUCKY NUMBERS 

and 
win a half sub 

Four Winners 
Every Weekl 



Cillo's CollcRe Comff 
llOg W. ThIidSI., Wllliiimporl 
<Ncxl lo Academic Center) 
Pbone Abeid: 3221321 
Hours: 7:30 ■.m. lo 6:00 p.m. 
Monday Ihrough Friday 



menl, a new frame-rack for the auto- 
body department, and several drill 
presses and lathes for the machine shop 
department. 

The College has allocated approx- 
imately $50,0(X) for updating equip- 
ment this year, the director said. 

Here 'til Nov. 9 

Dr. Martin reviewed the students' 
time schedule and stated that they at- 
tend the College program on a quarterly 
basis. 

The students coming tomorrow will 
attend the program until Nov. 9. They 
will return Jan. 28 and finish March 29. 
The second group of students, which 
numbers 375, come to the College Nov. 
12 through Jan. 25 and from April 3 to 
June 6, Dr. Martin slated. 

When students are not attending 
the College portion of the program, they 
are completing class requirements at 
their home schools, the director pointed 
out. 

The school districts participating in 
this program are Canton, East Lycom- 
ing, Jersey Shore, Keystone Central, 
Millville, Montgomery, Montoursville, 
Southern Tioga, South Williamsport, 
Sullivan County, Warrior Run, 
Wellsboro Area and Williamsport Area. 



Hours for students to use the new 
Recreation Center in the Lifelong 
Education Center are 8 a.m. to 10 p.m., 
Mondays through Thursdays, and 8 
a.m. to 4;30 p.m. on Fridays. 

"We anticipate adding hours for 
weekend usage in the near future," said 
Mrs. JoAnn R. Fremiotti, coordinator 
of intramural athletics and College ac- 
tivities. 

The Recreation Center is located in 
Room 136A, Lifelong Education Center 
(LEG). The Center has videogames, 
pinball machines and two billiard 
tables. 

"We will be adding some board 
games (chess. Trivial Pursuit) and play- 
ing cards," commented Mrs. Fremiotti, 

Sigma Phi Omega 
sets first meeting 

Continued from page I 

supplied the student lounge with a clock 

and pencil sharpner, hosted a Christmas 

party, and gave candy to disadvantaged 

children. 

"I believe Sigma Phi enhances the 
members as individuals," Mrs. Moon 
said. She noted that while being involv- 
ed in the club, the students learn how to 
run an organization. 

!|3U|Bdl|Jni 

auBaf Ifl i)|nqs aSJOso Ifl "SllV 
*POOM IZl BBWoqafl z uqof [j] 

SJ3MSUV J91|BmSMa|g 



"Students are invited to give suggestions 
as to what games they would like to see 
in the Recreation Center," she added. 
Interested students may contact 
Mrs. Fremiotti in Room 108, Bardo 
Gym, or at Ext. 269. 



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Tool 

AND 

Tool Box 
Display 

Two Days! 

TodaL Sept. 4 

and 

Tomorrow, Sept. 5 

10 A.M. to 4 P.M. 

College 
Bookstore 

in the LRC 

Today "and tomorrow, 

Kennedy Tool Box^ 

and Starrett Tools 

will have their 

representatives 

in the Bookstore 

in the Learning Resources 

Center. 



County asked to pick up sponsorship 



Lycoming County has been asked to pick up sonsorship of the College when 
(he existing 20-year agreement of sponsorship with 20 school districts ends next 
year. 

The formal proposal was released Friday during a press conference in the 
College Board of Trustees meeting room in the Lifelong Education Center. 

The proposal became news Thursday as a result of a meeting of the Lycom- 
ing County Commissioners during which Dr. Robert L. Breuder, College presi- 
dent, spoke. 

On Friday, at the press conference. Dr. Breuder told media representatives 
that a decision had been reached to terminate the existing sponsorship agreement 
between the College and the 20 sponsoring school districts. 

According to Dr. Breuder, getting the College budget approved by 14 of the 
20 sponsoring districts is a very difficult task. 

As of last week, 14 of the districts have indicated publicly they wished to 
withdraw and divert the money used for sponsorship to their "primary respon- 
sibility", grades 1 through 12. 

With this in mind, the media representatives were told, the trustees have 



been looking for the alternative financing needed to continue as a community 
college. It was pointed out that although the long-term goal of the College is 
state sponsorship, the interim plan involving Lycoming County as the primary 
sponsor is being developed. 

Dr. Breuder stated, "the relationship between school districts and 
community colleges from a fiscal point of view is not in the best interest of 
either party... until such time as the community college is able to get better 
support in terms of financing from the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania." 
He noted, "they see the ultimate sponsorship framework at the local 
level." 

In response to a question, the president detailed how much of the Col- 
lege's budget income is derived from the sponsoring districts. He noted. 
"If you look at Lycoming County as a potential sponsor of The 
Williamsport Area Community College, less than 10 percent of our total 
budget would come from Lycoming County taxpayers... through Lycoming 
County government, about $1.5 million a year out of our $18 million 
budget." 

After Thursday's announcement, the county commissioners said they 
were studying the proposal. 



Spotlight 

Vol 20, No. 3 Monday, Sept. 10, 1984 4 Pages 
Williamsport Area Cominunily College, Williamsport, Pa. 17701 



140 registered for new 
Weekend College 'pUot program' 



One-hundred and forty people 
registered for the four-option "Weekend 
College" pilot program, which com- 
menced Sept. 1, according to Dr. 
Donald B. Bergerstock, director of the 
business and computer technologies 
division. 

Dr. Bergerstock and Thomas 
Leitzel, assistant director of the divi- 
sion, were instrumental in organizing 
the program, which offers certificate 
and associate degree programs within 
the division. 

The two originated the ideas out of 
eariier meetings for ideas on the College 
offering new, non-traditional modes of 
education, and received approval from 
Dr. Robert L. Breuder, College presi- 
dent, with the "green light" for the pro- 
gram last February. 

Courses offered under the newly- 
implemented program include accoun- 
ting 1, BASIC language programming, 
word processing I, introduction to 
microcomputers, principals of business, 
supervision of human relations, fun- 
damentals of computer science and 
small business management. 

Dr. Bergerstock stated that the pro- 
gram's purpose is "two-fold," explain- 
ing that it is for students who are just 
starting their education, or those who 
want to update their skills or change 
careers. The director also noted that 
full-time students may also be involved 
in the program in order to carry a 
lighter load throughout the week. 

Weekend college courses proposed 
for the Spring include English, math, 
health services, integrated studies, 
technical studies and construction 
technology. "We hope to touch on 
almost all areas (courses) of the 
College," Dr. Bergerstock noted, ad- 



ding, "I don't see why we couldn't have 
SOO students enrolled in the program in 
a few years." 

Dr. Bergerstock stated that he has 
received "very favorable" response 
from the College and the community on 
the program, adding that he received 20 
to 25 calls per week about it. 

In relation to personnel. Dr. 
Bergerstock stated that instructors for 
the courses are a mixture of full-time 
College instructors and newly-hired 
part-time teachers. 

He added that all "support areas" 
are available to the students, including 
the library, the Susquehanna Room, the 
gymnasium, the computer lab, and on a 
part-time basis, the student records of- 
fice. The security staff is also increased 
through the weekend, and the director 
noted that the tuition from the weekend 
college students will cover the increased 
cost of the offices and services remain- 
ing open during the extra time. 

Students are also eligible for reduc- 
ed rates at the Genetti-Lycoming Hotel, 
on the corner of West Fourth and 
William Streets, and the Sheraton Inn, 
on 100 Pine Street. 

Dr. Bergerstock noted that the Col- 
lege administration did not set up a cer- 
tain requirement on the number of 
students to be enrolled before going 
ahead with the program, but he stated 
that three of the classes-accounting I, 
fundamentals of computer science and 
word processing-are filled to capacity. 

The program's four options in- 
clude: Option A~to meet Saturday 
mornings from Sept. I to Dec. 16 in ac- 
counting and BASIC language program- 
ming classes for 15 meetings; Option 

Conlinued on page 3 




AT PRESS CONFERENCE - Fourteen secondary school district 
superintendents attended a press conference Friday morning in the Lifelong 
Education Center to discuss the question of sponsorship for the College. Among 
them, in this photo, from left are B. Allen Schoonover, Troy Area; James 
Revello, South Williamsport Area; Cari R. Martin, Sullivan County; Charies 
Reichler, Northern Potter; Dr. Luther Natter, Mifflinburg Area; Dr. Carl 
Rohrbach, Selinsgrove Area; Dr. Robert L. Breuder, College president, and Dr. 
Oscar Knade Jr., Williamsport Area. /SPOTLIGHT photo/ 



ID processing 
continues this week 

Student identification card process- 
ing continues this week on a Umited 
basis. 

According to Mrs. JoAnn R. 
Fremiotti, coordinator of intramural 
athletics and College activities, ID pro- 
cessing hours will be from 10 a.m. to 
noon, Monday through Friday, and 
from 4 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Monday 
through Thursday. 

She said students may bring their 
course schedules for ID validation to 
Room 138A, Lifelong Education 
Center. Photos for new IDs will then be 
taken in the Recreation Center next 
door. 



Open gym schedule set 

Anyone interested in using Bardo 
Gym after 4 p.m. must show proper 
College identification, according to 
Mrs. JoAnn R. Fremiotti, coordinator 
of intramural athletics and College ac- 
tivities. 

Mrs. Fremiotti added that no out- 
side equipment is allowed in the gym. 
Equipment such as balls will be provid- 
ed, she said. 

Daily schedule for open gym 

Monday, Sept. 10, 8 p.m. to 10 
p.m. 

Tuesday, Sept. II, 8 to 10 p.m. 

Wednesday, Sept. 12, 7 p.m. to 10 
p.m. 

Thursday, Sept. 13, 7 p.m. to 10 
p.m. 



2 SPOTUGHT Monday, Sept. 10, 1984 



They followed 
through: locker 
debate 'settled' 



Police warning about sign stealing: 
it's 'more serious than just a prank' 



Perhaps unnoticed by some 
around campus was an example of 
follow-through, discussion and pelilion 
- and settlement. The subject: lockers 
in the Academic Center. 

As far as we can determine, 
lockers in the building in the past have 
been available on a "first-come, first- 
served" basis. This year, something 
changed. 

II started Aug. 31 when some 
students, including Thresa Ronen. 
general studies student from Cogan 
Station, found a notice on a locker she 
had claimed. The notice said she had 
to vacate the locker because it was 
one of those reserved for electronics 
studentS- 

She and Diane J. Madden, com- 
puter science student from Mon- 
toursviiie. whose locker was also "tag- 
ged", decided lo follow through. They 
went lo Lawrence W. Emery Jr.. direc- 
tor of counseling, career development, 
and placement, to air their complaint. 



They were then sent to Mrs. 
Veronica M. Muzic, acting director of 
the Integrated Studies Division. She 
referred them lo John F. Thompson, 
associate dean of academic affairs. 

In the meantime, a petition was 
started. By Thursday last week, more 
than 98 persons had signed it. 

Dean Thompson told the two 
students that he would get in touch 
with Victor A. Michael Sr.. associate 
professor of electronics. 

On Thursday, then, a compromise 
was reached: Those who had lockers 
as of that day - electronics or other 
majors - keep them for the semester. 
Miss Ronen said she wanted to 
thank those who "helped" by signing 
the petition. 

She and the other students involv- 
ed - as well as others - deserve public 
note for rationally following through, 
discussing - and reaching a rational 
compromise agreement to solve the 
problem. 



According to city police, this time 
of the year is recognized in the legal 
circles as the season of the "rash of sign 
stealing". 

Captain Ralph March, head of the 
detective department of the 
Williamsport city police, noted that with 
the influx of students from the College 
and Lycoming College, the students 
tend to have parties or induction 
ceremonies for fraternities and 
sororities, and sometimes eet a little out 
of hand and steal traffic signs, such as 
stop signs or railroad warning signs. 

The captain stated that this kind of 
action is taken more seriously than a 
college prank in the Lycoming County 
justice system. He noted that the charge 
for stealing a sign is theft and is usually 
a misdemeaner. A student could be ar- 
rested for this charge by a summons be- 
ing mailed to his residence by a warrant 
beine served. 

He continued that in most cases. 



the accused is taken before one of the 
county's district justices, who levies a 
fine on the person according to the 
amount the sign was valued at. The 
justice could find sufficient evidence to 
hold the student for court, and a hear- 
ing would be scheduled. 

The Justice could also commit the 
student to to the county prison and set a 
bail amount, therefore holding the ac- 
cused in the penal institution if bail 
cannot be posted. 

Captain March also noted that if 
an accident occurs due to a traffic sign 
not being in the proper place, additional 
charges can be brought against the stu- 
dent, such as involuntary manslaughter. 

"Some of the students are tax- 
payers, and they're paying for the signs, 
so it's just money out of their pockets if 
they steal the signs, because Uiey will 
have to be replaced," stressed the cap- 



Characters seek 'awareness' 

Reviewer Andy M. Sutryn 
fired by book 

Castaneda fans have yet another brilliant book to add to their collections. 

The Fire from Within Is the author's most thought-provoking and unusual book - 
one in which Castaneda. under the tutelage of don Juan and his disciples at last 
constructs a stunnina oorltait of the "sorcerer's" world that is crystal-clear and 

dizzying In Its (mpllcaf/ons. Together with don Juan and don Jenero, Carlos 
Castaneda takes the reader on a journey in search of "The Eagle", the universal 
source of "awareness". 

This is a typically well-written and exciting bit of writing and is sure to hold 
the attention of even the most conservative person - provided that person is 
ready for an excursion into his or her own mystery. Although not yet available in 
paperback, this is a book that I strongly recommend. 

W/70 'ya gonna call?' 

asks reviewer Canda M. ZInck 
Of The SPOTLIGHT Staff 

The soundtrack from the movie, "Ghostbusters". seems to be haunting 
the airwaves lately- 
Sung by Ray Parker Jr.. Ghostbusters has risen to the number one star on 
the nation 's Top 40 with its happy-go-lucky rhythm. Ghostbusters is not only 
pleasurable to listen to, but is also comical. Parker's mellow voice along with 
the high-pitched, childish chorus lines of the cameo singers blend together to 
make an unusually different type of sound. The movie might have to do with 
some of the popularity of Ghostbusters, but credit must be given to Parker and 
the others who participated in singing this hit. 

The soundtrack rates a 6'/2 or 7 on a scale of 1 to 1 0, but different people 
have difterent tastes. So, for an opinion - who ya' gonna call? 

SPOTUOHT 
5. Vol. 20. No. 3 

.J, Mond»y, S«pt. 10, 1984 

^ Cori.*„'.°h„V,H"^ l» publl.h.d uch IWonday ol th. .Md.mlc yoar. .xc.pl for official 
X rt^l "^ holiday., b, Joumallam and oth.r lnt«,..l.d atud.nla. Opinlona .xpr." sad 
.^ do not rapras.nl Iha oNlclal opinion ol Iha Collag. "pinions .xpr.ssad 

■* w ThI!If c. "^Z '' *"^"'""'"= <=•"'•'• Williamsport Ar.a Communlly Collag. 1 005 
^. W Third SI., Wllll.mspon. Pa. 17701. Tal.phon.: (717) 326-3761 ExI 221 

■."% Don 

J Th. SPOTLIGHT Is a m.mb.r of ih. Columbia Scholastic Prass Association 

■■■' . STAFF 

■* DHm .„„j;'"'JI; "'■;;"0l"« 'OHon Karan M. M.tarko, edilorlal pag. aditor Rodn.v 

^ mInT ralCa.'. "."id, or"j°.m°;." «"'•■!• '"?'"»»'•'"'» """"^ ""K S. Schwink^ ad' 
niiK.J. I -, , !. ■ •''"'•" *•■ "0"l«»»y. slud.nt affairs .dllor Kalhrvn M 

Slatl. Kalhlaan L. El.w.n. D.nls. V. Enlgk, Roxann. A. Goodl.r Rob.rt w 

Sandra R. Taylor. L.Roy S. Whltmlr, Jr.. J.nnll.r S. WhII., Canda M ZInck 
^ LI C D 

^ „ ., . - Production SlaH This Issu. 

* Karan'M Mj5!rkT"/„'n '"«;,"'="°" •"P'ml'-n Oonna M. Barnatl. ,ld«compo,ltlon 
«■ Morlt.m s.„3™ i t", •"'l"";/""'l"n L. Elsw.rt. Roxann. A. Qoodl.r, Ann. T 
^ Morai.iii, Sandra R. Taylor, production aislatanti. 



tain. "And il will be even more money 
out of their pockets if they're caught.' 

State Coalition Against Rape leader 
to speak next week at North Campus 

Beverly Elliott, head of the Pennsylvania Coalition Against Rape, headquarted 
in Harrisburg, will be the first speaker of the semester and open the series of mon- 
thly meetings of the Women's Resource Network at the North Campus in 
1870s which are politically pertinent to- 
day. 

December's meeting will include a 
discussion and demonstration on fitness 
and feminism by Daisy Horton, pro- 
fessor of health and physical education 
at Mansfield University who will also be 
teaching at the North Campus. 

The meetings are open to anyone 
interested. 

More magazines 
in College Library 

With 100 additional magazines 
available this year than were last year, 
the Library has almost 500 magazines in 
its collection. 

Among the additions are 
Classroom Computer Learning, Byte, 
and Fine Woodowrking, Women's 
Wear Daily, and M (The Civilized 
Man). 

The magazines cannot be "checked 
out" but are available during Library 
hours. 



Wellsboro. 

The presentation will be held at 7 
p.m., Wednesday, Sept. 19, in Room 
125, North Campus. 

According lo Dr. Cathryn L. Ad- 
dy, director of the North Campus, the 
Coalition leader will speak on steps to 
take in order to organize a women's 
center in Tioga County, where the cam- 
pus is located. 

Dr. Addy stated that the network 
was organized over a year ago to pro- 
vide the county women with all informa- 
tion and support group that meets on a 
regular basis. 

She stressed that the Network is 
different than the National Organization 
of Women in that the Network is not 
politically-oriented, but acts as an 
educational and social base. 

Highhghts of other meetings will 
include a film, Samantha Rustles the 
Woman Question, to be shown at the 
October meeting. 

Dr. Addy said the film involves 
writings on women's issues of the late 



looking for good reading, but shocked by new book prices? 
Come to... 

The Last Hurrah Bookshop 

937 Memorial Ave. 

(I l)lk. north 0/41/1 St., bel. 4(li & Slli Ave.) 

•Most Paperbacks 50' - 75' •Hardbacks $1.00/up 
Over 15,000 books... Check our selection for your books' 

Open Wed. and Fri. 9 a.m. lo 6 p.m. 



Day 

Friday 
Tuesday 



Monday 
Friday 

Friday 



Tuesday 

Wednesday 

Sunday 

Monday 

Tuesday 



Date 

Sept. 14 
Sept. 18 



Sept. 24 
Sept. 28 

Oct. 5 



Oct. 9 
Oct. 10 
Oct. 14 
Oct. 15 
Oct. 16 



Student golf schedule listed 



OppODCOt 

Montgomery County CC 
Bucks County CC and 
Northampton County CC 
Northampton County CC 
Montgomery County CC 
Bucks County CC and 
Luzerne County CC 
Luzerne County CC and 
Northampton County CC 
at Luzerne County CC 
Northampton CC 
EPCC Tournament 
PSCCJCAC 
at Penn State 
University (Blue) 



Plice 

Home 

Away 



Away 
Home 



Away 
Home 
Home 
Away 



Time 

1:30 p.m. 
1:30 p.m. 

1:30 p.m. 
1:30 p.m. 



2 p.m. 
2 p.m. 
11 a.m. 



Monday, Sept. 10, 1984 SPOTLIGHT 3 

Football clinic 
set tonight 

A pre-toumament clinic will be 
held for those who have signed up for 
the intramural flag football, according 
to Mrs. JoAnn R. Fremiotti, coor- 
dinator of intramural athletics and Col- 
lege activities. 

The clinic will be held tonight from 
4:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. in the Bardo Gym, 
said Mrs. Fremiotti. 

A clinic will also be held in the 
Bardo Gym tomorrow night at the same 
time, for anyone interested in officiating 
the newly-formed football league, added 
Mrs. Fremiotti. 



North Campus 
classes begin; 
enrollment up 

Student orientation activities 
recently held at the North Campus, in 
Wellsboro, were detailed by Dr. 
Cathryn L. Addy, North Campus direc- 
tor. 

She stated that school "officially 
began" at the campus when an orienta- 
tion session was held Aug. 22. Dr. 
Robert L. Breuder, College president, 
was the featured speaker and detailed 
some of the activities at the Main Cam- 
pus. 

She added that about 100 student 
attended the New Student Orientation 
Aug. 23, and activities included the in- 
troduction of Dr. Addy and a tour of 
the computer and audiovisual and 
tutorial labs by three computer science 
technology students from Wellsboro: 
Walter L. Reese, Ross L. Ingerick and 
Bryan L. Berguson. 

The students and their parents were 
also invited that day to participate in a 
special session to discuss career options. 

Classes began Aug. 27 with about 
180 students attending 38 classes in the 
five curricula offered at the campus: 
computer science technology, accoun- 
ting, practical nursing, secretarial 
science (executive), and business 
management. 

Dr. Addy noted that the total 
enrollment for the Fall is about twice 
the amount of students that attended 
last year. 

The North Campus opened in 
January 1983 with 15 practical nursing 
students. The secretarial science and 
computer science programs were im- 
plemental at the campus in Fall 1983. 



PBL orientation 140 registered for new 

meeting tomorrow 



All business and computer science 
students are being invited to attend the 
first general meeting of Phi Beta Lamb- 
da (PBL), according to Jonathan F. 
Miller, computer science student from 
Williamsport and PBL president. 

The meeting will be held at 3 p.m. 
tomorrow in Room 329 of the Academic 
Center. 

Miller said that the meeting will be 
an "orientation" session, including 
discussion of future club events. 

"Applications and pamphlets will 
be on hand," Miller said. 

Plans for the ninth annual picnic 
buffet dinner and the float for the Mum- 
mers' Day parade are underway, it was 
noted. 

Newly-appointed officers are Judy 
Brockaw, a computer science 
technology student from Canton and 
former PBL administrative aide who 
now is the group's public relations of- 
ficer and Sherry L. Wilkins, secretarial 
science student from Lawrenceville, who 
is the new administrative aide. 



Continued from page I 

B-a concentrated study for four 
weekends beginning Sept. 7 through 
Sept. 30 and Oct. 19 through Nov. 11 
for word processing and introduction to 
microcomputers; Option C-io meet 
every three weekends from Sept. 7 to 
Nov. 11 for principals of business and 
supervision and human relations, and 
Option D~to meet every second 
weekend from Sept. 7 to Dec. 15 for 
fundamentals of computer science and 
Sept.8 through Dec. 16 for small 
business management. 

Weekend College time schedules 
have also been broken down into four 
categories: Schedule 1-9 a.m. to noon 
every Saturday for 15 meetings; 
Schedule 2-6 p.m. to 9 p.m. Friday, 9 
a.m. to noon and 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. 
Saturday and 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Sun- 
day; Schedule 3-6:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. 
Friday, 10 a.m. to noon and 3:30 p.m. 
to 6:30 p.m. Saturday, and Schedule 
4-8 a.m. to 10 a.m. and 12:30 p.m. to 
3:30 p.m. Saturday and 10 a.m. to 1 
p.m. Sunday. 



The classes are mainly taught in the 
Academic Center, with a few meeting in 
the new Henry G. Hager Lifelong 
Education Center, stated Dr. 
Bergerstock. 

Registration deadlines for each 
class of the program was the first day 
the class met. Dr. Bergerstock noted. 

For further information, contact 
Dr. Bergerstock or Leitzel at Ext. 225. 

I Bulletin board | 
rules detailed i ^ ^ 

Any student wishing to make an- 
nouncements or disperse messages to 
the campus community may write them 
up and submit them to Room 137A, 
Lifelong Education Center, according to 
Mrs. JoAnn R. Fremiotti, coordinator 
of intramural athletics and College ac- 
tivities. 

"If the message or announcement 
is approved, it will be posted on the ap- 
propriate campus bulletin board," she 
said. 



STUDENTS... 
Why fuss? Stop by 
us and pick up a 
delicious dinner! 



BENSON 




€MnM mini 
fMMnmarket 



Corner of Srd and Moynard Sts. 

Always Open Nights, Sundays, and Holidays 



Church of the Annunciation 

410 Walnut Street 

(Corner of West Fourth and Walnut Sts.) 

Telephone: 323-9456 

Msgr. Wiiliam J. Fleming, V.F., Pastor 

Father Richard J. Loch, Asst. - 

Father Ben S. Kozen, Assl. 

Father Joseph D. Gilbert, in residence 

Uhe Good Shepherd. I know Mine and Mine know Me . . ./or these f will give My life." - John 10:14-15 




Schedule of Services 
weekend masses: 

Saturday Evening - 4 P.M. and 5:30 P.M. 

Sunday Morning - 7:30, 9:00, 10:15, and 11:30 A.M. 

Sunday Afternoon - 5:00 P.M. 
DAILY MASSES: 

7:00 and 8:00 A.M. and 12:10 P.M. (except Saturday) 
SACRAMENT OF CONFESSION: Saturday, 4:45 to 5:30 P.M. 
or by ippointmenl. 



4 SPOTLIGHT Monday, Sepl. 10, 1984 



The feel-good 
movie of 1983." 



Hew much love, sex, fun and 
friendship can a person take? 




THE ^_^m ^^^_A. 

BlOCHtLL 



Tonight 7:30 p.m. 
ACC ADdilorinm 



$1 (with ID) 
$2 (without ID) 



Recruiter details 
student housing 
information 

"Facts About Housing", a pam- 
phlet concerning student housing, is 
available in the Admissions Office, 
Room 104, Academic Center, according 
to Miss Mary M. Sinibaldi, admissions 
recruiter. 

The brochure has information and 
guidelines for any student who may 
have questions about housing. 

Miss Sinibaldi noted that her office 
has a list of landlords available, in- 
cluding locations and rent costs. She 
also said that she could help students 
encountering problems with landlords 
or housing ~ such as leases or security 
deposits - as long as the unit is listed 
with the College. 

Students may contact Miss 
Sinibaldi in the Admissions Office or by 
calling Ext. 338. «—- , 



Part-Time job Openings Listed 

InSomation ahoul parl-lime jobs is provided by Lawrence W. Emery, director of 
Counseling, Career DevelopmenI, and Placement. Additional information is available 
from persons in that office which is in the Learning Resources Center. 




Delivery To Your Door 
PARK PIZZA 
10 percent off any Large Pizza 
With this Coupon 



Open 7 Days 

1701 Memorial Ave. 

322-9024 



Lifeguard - at the Young Women's Christian Association, 815 W. 
Fourth St., for six to eight hours per week. Must have current Red Cross 
Life Guard certification. Call Jeff Raisch at 322-4637 or inquire at the 'Y'. 

Telephone opet^tors - Community involvement has openings for 
several telephone operators to work 6 to 9 p.m. five nights a week and 10 
to 2 some Saturdays for $3 an hour. Call Pat Craven at 323-4277 or stop 
by at 238 market St. (first fioor) between 9 a.m. and 9 p.m,. 

Skating set 
for Thursday 

Rollerskating, sponsored by the 
Student Government Association 
(SGA), is scheduled for 8 p.m. to mid- 
night Thursday at Skating Plus, Icoated 
at the corner of Via Bella and William 
Streets, downtown Williamsport. 

"The event is free for students with 
a currently validated College identifica- 
tion card," said Mrs. JoAnn R. 
Fremiotti, coordinator of intramural 
athletics and College activities. "The fee 
is $2 for all others." 

Mrs. Fremiotti added that no 
tickets need to be purchasd in advance 
and that skates are available for rental 
for 75 cents. 



) Cillo's 

^ College Comer 

We'll prepare your 
favorite Subs and Burgers 
the way you like ttiem! 




High school students to gather for yearbook workshop 



High schools throughout the Nor- 
thern Tier as well as lower New Yorl( 
are expected to be represented tomor- 
row when the I Ith annual Herff Jones 
Yearbook Workshop convenes on Main 
Campus. 

The workshop, titled as "Year- 
bookability '85", is coordinated by 
Charles Bollinger, a representative of 
the yearbook company. He said he ex- 
pects over 100 high school students to 



attend the day-long session. 

During the workshop, Anthony N. 
Cillo, faculty advisor to the 
SPOTLIGHT and members of the stu- 
dent newspaper staff, provide liaison for 
those attending and for guest speakers. 

Robert W. Wolfe, assistant director 
of the Integrated Studies Division, will 
give opening remarks and welcome 
those attending to the College. 

The morning session of the 



workshop will be broken into individual 
workshop seminars, dealing with some 
of the basics of yearbook production as 
well as some creative yearbook applica- 
tions, according to Bollinger. 

The afternoon sessions will deal 
mainly with layout, from basics to final 
preparation, photography and com- 
puter yearbooking. An advisors' round- 
table and yearbook critique will both be 
conducted in the afternoon. 



Spotlight 



Vol. 20, Nu. 4 Monday, Sept. 17, 1984 12 Pages 
Williamspnrl Area Communlly College, Wiitiamsport, Pa. 17701 



Most districts 
indicate they want 
to end agreement; 
study goes on 

Discussion of the Williamsport 
Area Community College sponsorship 
continued last week with the matter still 
under study by the Lycoming County 
Commissioners and with the two current 
non-sponsor school districts' boards 
reacting to an agreement indicating in- 
tent to withdraw from sponsorship. 

On campus, various persons 
discussed the sponsorship issue, in- 
cluding Dr. James E. Middleton, dean 
of academic affairs, who foretold in- 
creased costs for students if sponsorship 
is not picked up. fSee story, Page 3/ 
Although there is no specific time-frame 
for the decision by the Lycoming Coun- 
ty Commissioners, the determination 
will have to be made sometime this fall 
to be included in the 1985 county 
budget, according to Rodney G. 
Hurley, dean of educational research at 
the College. 

At last count, 14 of the 20 sponsor- 
ing school districts involved had notified 
the College in writing that they intend to 
Please turn to page 4 

Folksinger to be 
here Thursday 

Folksinger and entertainer Ted 
Steranko will give a Student Govern- 
ment Association (SGA) sponsored per- 
formance at the College this Tursday. 

According to Steven D. Metzker, 
business management student from 
Williamsport and SGA president, 
Steranko will make two preliminary ap- 
pearances. 

The first will be from 9:30 to 10:30 
a.m. at the Natural Resources Center 
(NRC), at Allenwood. "He will perform 
in the lunchroom or on the patio, 
depending on the weather conditions," 
Please turn lo page 12 



ARTISTS 
UNLIMITED 

elected officers 
recently: George E. 
Boudman, of Millville, 
(righl-rear), was named 
president. To serve with 
him are Thomas E. 
Worth, of Linden, vice 
president (rigbf- 
foreground); Alma Jane 
Kieffer, of Mifflinburg, 
secretary, and Andrew 
G. Slovensky, of Ford 
City, treasurer. Sloven- 
sky is a technical illustra- 
tion major; the others 
are advertising art ma- 
jors. [Courtesy photoj 







Remaining intercollegiate sports may be 
dropped in '85; low participation cited 



After May of 1985, the existing in- 
tercollegiate sports program at the Col- 
lege may be discontinued, according to 
Rodney G. Hurley, acting associate 
dean of educational services. 

The consideration is taking place 
during preliminary budget planning for 
next year. 

The most significant reason for the 
consideration to drop intercollegiate 
basketball, golf, cross country, and ten- 
nis - the four sports which remained 
after a budget cut last year - is the lack 
of participating athletes and the low tur- 
nout of fans, said the dean. 

Essentially the same reasons were 
cited last year when the intercollegiate 
sports program was trimmed. 

Dean Hurley added that with few 
spectators there are in attendance, there 
is the impression that the students are 
not getting a full share of the activity fee i 



which they paid. 

Harry C. Specht, assistant pro- 
fessor of physical education, said he did 
not agree with the reasons. He said, 
too, that he feels athlete participation is 
good. Further, he said, the types of 
sports now on the intercollegiate 
schedule are not really spectator sports. 

Specht also said that he felt 
students should say how they want their 
activity fee used. Students should, he 
said, give input, express themselves, and 
gel involved in decision-making. 



Inside this weel(... 

Crossword Puzzle, Page 11 
SGA wants members, Page 3 

Progress oa Center, Page 7 



'Without 
a legal 
sponsor 
there is 
no college' 

SPOTLIGHT commentary 
on current College 
sponsorship controversy 

Recently the school districts 
VKhich have sponsored this College for 
the past 20 years decided that the time 
had come to withdrav^ from that 
responsibility. 

The College Board of Trustees 
determined that the best course of ac- 
tion would be for Lycoming County to 
take the sponsorship role until the state 
takes charge 

A decision by the county commis- 
sioners to sponsor the Community Col- 
lege would be a sagacious decision, 
considering how dominant the College 
is in the county: 

- In an economic study conducted 
recently, the College was found to 
have a $52 million impact on the coun- 
ty economy. 

- This institution is the third largest 
employer in the county. 

- The Williamsport Chamber of 
Commerce conducted a survey and 
found the College to be the second 
most vital resource (the environment 
was the first) in the Susquehanna 
Valley. 

There are presently seven com- 
munity colleges in Pennsylvania which 
are sponsored by their respective 
counties. They have found that they 
can better plan for the future, that they 
are more representative of the 
geographic areas concerned, and that 
they have more secure and stable rela- 
tions with the sponsor. 

Financial security is especially im- 
portant because when it is threatened, 
accreditation is in jeopardy. Without 
accreditation, there is no college. 
Without a legal sponsor, there is no col- 
lege. 

For those worrying about higher 
taxes: Aside from Loyalsock Township 
and Muncy. the taxes should remain 
about the same. For the two com- 
munities mentioned: They have an 
obligation to provide this invaluable 
service to their residents. 

The money that is spent on the 
College is returned - albeit, indirectly. 
Those who iearn a vocation usually 
return lo their homes to ply their trade 
- and become consumers 

The College is called a community 
college for a reason. It is meant to 
serve and benefit the community. 
Without local support, this fine institu- 
tion will be rendered useless, creating 
a tremendous vacuum in which much 
area talent will be lost. 

Again, a decision by the commis- 
sioners to support the Community Col- 
lege would be a wise one. 



2 SPOTLIGHT Monday. Sepl. 17, 19 

A helping hand 
works two ways 

SPOTLIGHT commentary 

on College community projects 




Practical experience and its com- 
munity impact go hand-in-hand as a 
trademarl< of the College. 

Several projects - for which in- 
structors and students devoted their 
time and expertise - were completed 
in the last several years. 

A "nickel-view" of these ac- 
complishments include student " live- 
work" experiences at the simulated 
paddleboat Hiawatha; the Little League 
Baseball's International Grove com- 
plex, the White Deer Golf Course, the 
Young Women's Christian Associa- 
tion, Ways Garden, and Brandon park. 

And now, students, the College 
and the community will benefit from 
the two current major projects under- 
way: Construction of the Professional 
Development Center and the Mon- 
toursville Indian Park project. 

Well over 100 students in the ser- 
vice and operation of heavy equipment 
curriculum over the next two years will 
have the advantage of using College- 
acquired knowledge in restoring the 
22-acre Indian Park, just off the 
Beltway, into an outdoor recreation 
area. 

Once a thriving amusement 
center, the park has lain dormant in re- 
cent years. The multitude of renova- 
tions planned to revive the area in- 
cludes picnic pavillions, nature and 
fitness trails, boat docks, benches and 



play areas, and facilities for the han- 
dicapped. 

The students will also be dredging 
a pond and tripling its size in order to 
utilize the waters for residents and 
tourists to enjoy the popular sports of 
fishing and sailboating. 

With the massiveness of the ven- 
ture, one begins to associate its com- 
pletion with the need for a large 
amount of money. 

A quarter of a million dollars - an 
astronomical sum to many of us - will 
be saved by the borough of Mon- 
toursville by the College students 
working on the project. An approx- 
imate 66 percent savings to the small 
community. The borough is allocating 
about $75,000 for the project. 

While the heavy equipment 
students help to provide a recreational 
area, over 1 ,000 students in the Con- 
struction Technology Division will be 
enhancing the College and the com- 
munity by fulfilling their practicums 
through the work on the Professional 
Development Center. 

The center's purpose will be to 
provide a facility for College meetings, 
conferences, special student events, 
AND community forums. 

The 6,000-square-foot building is 
being erected at the lower end of Sus- 
quehanna Street and the projected ex- 
pense for the project has been 



estimated at $500,000, with the need- 
ed dollars coming from the College in- 
stitutional resources, private dona- 
tions, and a donation from the 
Williamsport City Council. 

Design aspects for the center also 
had a hand from other students in the 
architectural technology program. 

We commend an institution such 
as ours, which grants students the op- 
portunity not only to know their future 
craft through textbooks, filmstrips, and 
lectures, but also through using and 
displaying their talents on solid 
grounds. 

And we support the decision 
made by Dr. Robert L. Breuder, Col- 
lege president, not to pull out of the In- 
dian Park project, even with the school 
district rejecting the College budget 
and two incidents of vandalism involv- 
ing College equipment occurring over 
the summer. 

We hope that in the wake of the 
controversy over the College ad- 
ministration requesting future sponsor- 
ship of the Community College by 
Lycoming County that the localities in 
which the students labored and the 
localities for which the College provid- 
ed resources will realize with what 
favorable economic and cultural im- 
pact that this institution has lent a hand 
to them. 



Rejuvenation efforts synnbolic 



SPOTLIGHT 

The proud woman, dressed In a 
loose robe that falls in graceful folds to 
the pedestal on which she stands, has 
seen millions of people cross her 
shore. 

At her feet is a broken shackle, 
which people seldom notice, which 
symbolizes the overthrow of tyranny. 

The people of France gave the 
Statue of Liberty to the (Minister of the 
United States on July 4, 1884, to sym- 
bolize friendship and the liberty that 

Editorial page 
policy given 

The SPOTLIGHT welcomes 
readers' opinions concerning campus, 
community and other subjects in the 
form of a "Letter to the Editor" 

The letter must be submitted to the 
editorial page editor by mailing it to 
The SPOTLIGHT, c/o the Williamsport 
Area Community College, 1005 West 
Third Street, Williamsport, PA 1 7701 , 
or by bringing it to the SPOTLIGHT of- 
fice. Room 7, Academic Center 

All letters must be signed No let- 
ters will be considered for publication 
without a signature The editorial page 
editor would also appreciate a 
telephone number accompanying the 
letter The number will not be publish- 
ed, but will only be used lor verifica- 
tion 

The length of the letter must be 
reserved to 300 words for space con- 
sideration The editor has the right to 
edit the letter or refuse publication 
within the restriction of the law. 

The editorial page editor must 
receive all reader opinion a week 
before the next publication date in 
order to include comments in the 
publication 



commentary 

citizens enjoy under a free form of 
government. 

On July 4, 1 984, the torch that has 
seen the beacon of liberty and the 
shedding of light upon the world was 
brought to the ground for reconstruc- 
tion never extinguished for those 
who seek freedom 

As our ancestors donated money 
for her construction, so will we donate 
for her reconstruction. 



Take action on your power 

SPOTLIGHT commentary 



It has all been said before. It's 
your right; it's your duty. You should be 
proud that you are allowed to vote. 

But what this election amounts to 
is each candidate trying to "sell" his or 
her ideals or beliefs to each voter. As 
the "future of America", we students 
must assume responsibility and try to 
understand the issues-at-hand. 

The deadline to register to vote is 
Oct 9 Registration can be completed 
through the Lycoming County Court 
House. 48 W. Third St., from 8:30 a.m. 



'Hospital' in 'Another World' 



'Soapbox review 

By Kathy L. Eiswert 

Of The SPOTLIGHT Staff 



In the world of soap operas, 
"General Hospital" is the most 
unrealistic and senseless - and not 
even worth the hour that ABC devotes 
to it. 

The show is dominated by 
glamour and wealth. We have yet to 
see Celia Ouartermaine in a T-shirt. 

Dr. (Monica Ouartermaine can step out of a seven-hour surgery looking like 
she just finished a modeling session for Mademoiselle magazine. 

Then, there's Holly Scorpio. Her day consists of rising from bed, dressing in 
a Ralph Lauren outfit, lounging in the health spa for a good part of the day, then 
gliding to the most expensive restaurant for a bottle of wine and an eight-course 
French dinner Her most grievous task in everyday life is answering the 
telephone. 

Story garble 

Subect/theme'' There are a few different situations portrayed in the show. 
One is the story line surrounding Rick Weber and Ginny Blake. Do they really 
believe that their son, Ivlike, is going to have a better life when he's being reared 
by two parents who absolutely detest each other - besides hardly knowing each 
other? 

Currently, Celia and Grant Putnam are riding oft into the sunset, granting the 
TV audience their greatest wish. It's instantly forgotten that Grant was "involved" 
with Tonya. 

However, we give the producers of the show credit. After all, they know ex- 
actly what to give viewers, making it one of the most popular soap operas - no 
matter how asinine. 



to 5 p.m., Monday through Friday. 

Students staying in the 
Williamsport area while attending the 
College, who are already registered, 
may go to the court house for an ap- 
plication, which must be returned by 
Oct. 30, the Tuesday before the elec- 
tion. 

Everyone should decide who is 
going to make decisions that affect us 
and the only way lo ensure this is to ex- 
ercise the power lo vote 

SPOTLIGHT 

Vol. 20, No. 4 

Monday, Sept. 17.1984 

n n □ 

The SPOTLIGHT Is published each Monday of 
the academic year, except for oftlclal College 
holidays, by Journalism and other interested 
students. Opinions expressed do not repre- 
sent the official opinion of the College. 

Office: t^oom 7. Academic Center. 
Williamsport Area Community College, 1005 
W. Third St., Williamsport, Pa. 17701. 
Telephone: (717) 326-3761, Ext. 221. 

n D o 

The SPOTLIGHT Is a member of the Col- 
umbia Scholastic Press Association. 
□ D D 
STAFF 
Donna M. Barnelt, managing editor; Karen M. 
Metarko, editorial page editor; Rodney 0. Hill, 
sports editor; Gisela D. Grassley, photography 
editor; Mark S. Schwanke, administrative af- 
fairs editor; James K. Morrlssey, student af- 
fairs editor; Kalhryn M. Gilbert, advertising 
director; Richard E. Kopp Jr., senior staff 

Staff: Wanna Brovin, Kathleen L. Eiswert, 
Denfse Y. Enlgk, floxanne A. Goodler, George 
I. Hawk Jr.. Robert W. MInler. Anne T. 
Moralelll, Donald E. Mumlord, Sandra L. 
Musgrave. Andrew C. Sutryn, Judith L. 
Swinehart, Sandra R. Taylor, LeRoy S. Whlt- 
mlre Jr., Jennifer S. White, Canda M. ZInck. 
D D D 
Production Stall This Issue 

Gisela D. Grassley, production super- 
visor; James K. Morrlssey, copy editor; 
Kalhryn M. Gilbert, vldeocomposltlon; George 
1. Hawk Jr., Donald E. Mumford. Sandra L. 
Musgrave, LeRoy S. Whltmlre Jr., and Jennlter 
S. White, production assistants. 



Monday, Sept. 17, 198'", SPOTLIGHT 3 




Increased financial impact foreseen 
for students due to sponsorship issue 



By Donna M. Barnell 
Of The SPOTLIGHT staff 

The sponsorship issue will result in 
a financial impact on sponsored 
students at the College, according to 
Dr. James E. Middleton, dean of 
academic affairs. 

The fact that 14 of the 20 school 
districts intend to withdraw from spon- 
sorship of the College will cause tuition 
increases for those students previously 
sponsored. 

But, Dr. Middleton also noted, 

' 'students currently being sponsored will 

NO BR-RRR-RR HERE - Last Monday in front of the AcademicVnter <:o'"in"^being sponsored throughout 

Auditorium, these students purchasing tickets didn't give "The Big ChiB" .he f /-• "^ 1'^ i ^Lf.f 1^,1 " ll tklS Satwday 



action, according to Dr. Middleton. 

Dr. Middleton expressed his hopes 
that Lycoming County will pick up the 
sponsorship. 

"The Community College does a 
lot for the community," he said. "It is 
the largest employer in the county and 
students spend about $52 million here in 
the area - which is a 39(X) percent 
payback for the county." 

PBL car wash 



cold shoulder! The Monday Movie Series continues this evening. /SPOTLIGHT ^'^ ^r,onsoKA 
pholo by Richard E. Kopp Jr.] 

Nurse's office in gym is open; 
student insurance information available 



1985, these students will no longer 



Give Blood- 
Save A Life 

SPOTLIGHT service message 



The Nurse's office is in Room 104, Bardo Gym, and is open from 8 a.m. to 
3:30 p.m. Mondays through Fridays, according to Mrs. Janet R. Querimit, R.N., 
College nurse. 

Mrs. Querimit also reported that student health insurance is available and that 
applications for that may be obtained in the nurse's office. 

She emphasized that the office could be used to get any medical advice or to 
discuss problems. 

"Many limes," she said, "students have a problem and immediately go to the 
hospital emergency wards - where they will be charged emergency room prices, 
then be sent to a specialist, and will have to pay for the specialist also." 

She added, "I will be glad to make appointments with the appropriate doctor 
if that is what is needed. Usually students are seen within a 24-hour period. This 
saves the student and parents a lot of added expense." 

About the student health insurance, she noted that the cost is $84.50 and that 
students who take the insurance are covered from now through August 1985. 

Athletic areas 
planned for 
1987 timeframe, 
dean reports 

The dean of educational research, 
Rodney G. Huriey, last week pointed p' 
out the success of the Recreation Center , 
in the Lifelong Education Center and 
reviewed plans for other, related student 
activities. 

"There's a lot of demand for the 
Recreation Center. We're trying to ex- 
tend the hours... Say, a half hour 
earlier in the morning and a half hour 
later at night," Dean Hurley said. 

Dean Hurley also pointed out plans 
for three tennis courts, two basketball 
courts, and two athletic fields ~ "one 
suitable for flag football or soccer and 
the other for softball". 

These are to be constructed near 
the Automotive Trades Center, Dean 
Hurley said. 

"There is also the possibility of a 
three-walled handball court, once the 
architects give us the details - probably 
in the 1987 time frame," Dean Hurley. 

"A Campus Center to house stu- 
dent activities has already been approv- 
ed in the 10-year plan," the dean add- 
ed. "Since the state provides 50 percent 
of the funds for the new building, we 
have to wait until we come up with the 
remainder of the costs." 



Anyone from outside the state or 
outside the 10-county sponsorship area 
will not be affected dramatically by the 

Outing Club 
inactive --but? 

Steven T. McDonald, media 
technician and advisor of the Outing 
Club, has announced that the club has 
become "inactive" ~ unless a large 
enough number of interested people can 
be gathered up in order to bring the club 
back to life. 

The club's first meeting of the 
semester, the week of Sept. 4, was poor- 
ly attended. "Two people showed up," 
McDonald stated. He added that three 
students and two staff members have 
approached him about the organization, 
but "we need more people in order to 
bother to do anything." 

Anyone interested in reviving the 
club may contact McDonald at College 
Ext. 219. 



Phi Beta I^ambda will hold a car 
wash from 8:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. this 
Saturday at Pizza Hut on the Golden 
Strip, East Third Street. 

The car wash is the first fund- 
raising event being conducted by Phi 
Beta Lambda this Fall. Profits from the 
car wash will be used to help pay ex- 
penses for members to attend the 
Eastern Regional Leadership Fall Con- 
ference in Stanford, Conn., Oct. 26, 27, 
and 28. 

According to Elizabeth A. 
Bogenrief, secretarial science student 
from Avis, the car wash charge will be 
$1.50 per car. 

Musically-inclined sought 

Students interested in forming any 
type of band are being asked to contact 
Mrs. JoAnn R. Fremiotti, coordinator 
of intramural athletics and College ac- 
tivities, in Room 108, Bardo Gym. 

Or, Mrs. Fremiotti said, students 
may go to the Recreation Center, Room 
A138, Lifelong Education Center, and 
leave their names, local phone number, 
and tell what instrument they play. 



JOIN SGA 



Interested in joining Student Government Association? 
Complete this form and take it to... 
the Recreation Office, A138 Lifelong Education Center (LEC)! 



Student's Name. 
Curriculum 



.Current Semesten 



Home Address. 



Home Telephone Number with Area Code- 
Signature of Applicant 



4 SPOTLIGHT Monday, Sepl. 17, 1984 



North Campus adds 
computers to lab, 
expands lab hours 

Eight IBM personal computers 
were installed last week in the computer 
lab of the North Campus, in Wellsboro, 
expanding the lab's capabilities and per- 
mitting extension of lab hours, accor- 
ding to Dr. Cathryn L. Addy, associate 
dean for North Campus. 

The computers, which cost about 
$20,000, add to the eight cathode-ray 
terminals (CRT's) already at the cam- 
pus, Dr. Addy said. 

New lab hours at the campus are 
8:30 a.m. to 9 p.m., Monday, Tuesday, 
and Wednesday, and 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., 
Thursday and Friday. 

The new hours are also included 
for the typing lab which is integrated in- 
to the computer lab section. 

Cooperative education 
information available 

The cooperative education program 
is on-the-job training and experience of- 
fered to students of the College for 
credit, according to Mrs. Elizabeth A. 
Dahlgren, assistant professor of 
business administration. 

Commenting last week, she said 
that students from the Business and 
Computer Science Technology Division 
have participated in the program. The 
number reflects about 20 percent of the 
entire College student body this year. 

Any business and computer science 
student interested may contact Mrs. 
Dahlgren at College Ext. 496 or in 
Room 312, Academic Center. 



Co-op education 
offers opportunities 
for all: director 

Cooperative education, which in- 
volves working and learning at the same 
time, offers opportunity to earn college 
credits while exploring a potential 
career, according to William C. Brad- 
shaw, director of experiential learning. 

He added that students have the 
chance to use tools and learn techniques 
not available on campus. 

Bradshaw said anyone wishing to 
find out more about co-op may talk to 
his or her division coordinator or visit 
the experiential learning office in Room 
157, Learning Resources Center. 

Co-op related jobs are also posted 
on various bulletin boards throughout 
the College, Bradshaw noted. 

Tutoring Center 
lends assistance, 
daily hours listed 

The Tutoring Center, located in 
Room 161, Learning Resources Center, 
is open for students who may need 
assistance. 

The Tutoring Center primarily of- 
fers aid in math and English and 
touches on some technical tutoring, ac- 
cording to Diana L. Kuhns, coordinator 
of tutoring. 

Office hours are Mondays through 
Thursdays, 8 a.m. to 9 p.m., and 
Fridays, 8 a.m, to 4 p.m. 

There is no charge for tutoring and 
no appointment is needed. 



MONDAY NIGHT MOVIES 



HriliiWHWMlyiiMMriiMiMatttf 



y Sit Back and 1 
Tune In! 

SUPERMAN III 

ACC Auditorium 

$1 (with ID) 



r 



$2 (without ID) 



.STARTING AT 7:30 P.M. 
■ton IBiiirr'1iiiii<wn 





WHAT'S COOKIN' - Kuhi Abe, a cook for the new Susquehanna Room, was 
"caughl" whiJe preparing Innch. /SPOTLIGHT pholoj 

ID processing at North today; 
continues on Main this week 

There will be no student identification card processing in the Lifelong Educa- 
tion Center on Main Campus today. 

Instead, ID validation/revalidation is taking place from 8 a.m. to 7 p m at the 
North Campus, located in Wellsboro. 

According to Mrs. JoAnn R. Fremiotti, coordinator of intramural athletics 
and College activities, ID processing hours for this week are 10 a.m to noon 
tomorrow through Friday and 4 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., tomorrow through Thursday' 

On Main Campus, students may bring their course schedules for ID validation 
to Room 138A, Lifelong Education Center. Photos for new IDs will then be taken 
m the Recreation Center next door. 

Most districts indicate they want 
to end agreement; study goes on 

Continued /mm Page I •> '-' 



withdraw from their sponsorship 
responsibility as of July 1, 1985. 
For background... 

The initial union was created on 
July 1, 1965, when articles of agreement 
were signed binding 19 school districts 
(number 20 was added in 1977) to spon- 
sor the College for 20 years. 

Now that the agreement has nearly 
expired, the school districts involved 
have banded together to remove 
themselves from any further respon- 
sibility. The districtrs cite a primary 
responsibihty to grades kindergarten 
through 12. Faced with the increasing 
costs and decreasing enrollments of 
their respective schools, they see the 
College as a burden. 

With this in mind, the College 
created the Agreement to Terminate the 
Agreement of Sponsorship. This agree- 
ment makes several points. Among 
ihem are: 

- The school districts sponsorship 
obligation ceases as of July 1, 1985. 

- There is a reaffirmed commit- 
ment to secondary vocational oppor- 



tunities for any school willing to pay for 
the service. 

-Former sponsoring districts with 
residents from outside Lycoming Coun- 
ty shall continue to pay the sponsor's 
share of costs for the 1985-86 fiscal year 
on behalf of students enrolled but not 
graduated in 1984-85. 

Two conditions must be met 

According to the agreement, two 
conditions have to be met or it is in- 
valid. The first condition is that a spon- 
sor other than the school districts in- 
volved be obtained as College sponsor. 
The second is the Pennsylvania State 
Board of Education must approve the 
termination of sponsorship of the Col- 
lege by the school districts. 

The 10-year proposal offered to the 
County Commissioners is an interim 
plan to sustain the College with hopes 
that the Commonwealth of Penn- 
sylvania will restructure the community 
college system and finance all such in- 
stitutions. 

-By Mark S. Schwanke 
Of The SPOTLIGHT Staff 



What do you think. 
..of the new season's TV shows? 

• * • 

Write your comments and send 

or bring to SPOTLIGHT office, 

Room 7, basement, ACC, 

before tommorrow noon. 



Mondaj, Sep(. 17, l<)84 SPOTLIGHT 5 




The Sidelines 



Sports Commentary 

By Rodney D. HiU 

SPOTLIGHT Sports Editor 



«*«,^*>'AiWMM'A)/in<irMu<>aiK»AlluM.l<l«M<NW'MMM 




Cross country rundown 



Date 

Sept. 19 
Sept. 22 
Sept. 25 
Oct. 6 

Oct. 13 



The 1984 baseball season is coming 
to end, and for those who are Pitt- 
sburgh Pirate fans, like I am, are pro- 
bably welcoming the end. 

The Pirates have the top pitching 
statistics as a team in the National 
Baseball League, but they are still 20 
plus games out of first place. 

The biggest turn around in baseball 
is the fact that the Chicago Cubs and 
the New York Mets are not fighting each 
other to stay out of the National League 
East cellar position, the Cubs are in first 
place and the Mets are right behind. 

I really didn't get turned off to 



Opponent 

Wiikes-Barre 
Philadelphia CC 
PSU Hazleton 
Delaware County CC 
and Luzerne County CC 
Bucks County CC and 
Montgomery County CC at 
Montgomery County CC 
EPCC Tournament 




think the boy would come out of Pete 

yet, at least not until he gave Ty Cobbs 

major league record for the most carer Sat. Oct. 27 EPCC Tournament Home 1 1 a.m. 

hits a good run for. Incidentally Ty Note: All cross country meets will be held at the White Deer Golf Course, 

Cobb was also a player/manager at one located on Route 15-South. 

With a baseball season like the Weight training 

1984 season, 1 have also long awaited ... ^ , i i i 

clinic to be held 



the upcoming football season 

I'm really looking foreward to this 
year's football season, especially the 
college level. The atmosphere is filled 
with enthusiasm that makes a game even 
more enjoyable. I think the competition 
is greater in college football than it is in 



baseball all together though, because of professional football because of the fact 
the big turn around in the top teams in that players are aware of the profes- 



their respective divisions. The teams in 
first place at the time of this writing are: 
the Detriot Tigers, the Minnesota 
Twins, the San Diego Padres and the 
Chicago Cubs. 

• • • 

The Detroit Tigers were the most 
recent team of the four to make the 
World Series and they accomplished 
that by winning the 1968 series. The 
other teams in their most recent series 
are: the Minnesota Twins losing to the 
Los Angeles Dodgers in I96S, the 
Chicago Cubs go way back to 1938 
when they lost their bid for the title to 
the New York Yankees. The San Diego 
Padres would be making their debut if 
they were to make the World Series. 

Making the news once again was 
Pete Rose, also known as "Charlie Hus- 
tle". Rose was traded for the first time 
in his illustrious 22 years to the Cincin- 
nati Reds as a player/manager. I didn't 



sional scouts watching them. 

The first college game of the year 
was the "kickoff classic" which pitted 
the Auburn Tigers against the defending 
national champions the Miami Hur- 
ricanes. 

Auburn was ranked number one by 
both the Associated Press and the 
United Press International Coaches Poll 
prior to the season, and the hurricanes 
continued their succcess by beating 
Auburn by two points. 
• • • 
A week later the hurricanes beat their 
nemesis the Florida Gators, the only 
team to beat Miami a year ago. 

This may be a tough year to predict 
a national championship team, I have 
only successfully picked one team to win 
the championship and that was Penn 
State in 1982, of course I pick them to 
win it every year. So what I'm one for 
fifteen 



A clinic will be held for anyone in- 
terested in weight training, according to 
Mrs. JoAnn R. Fremiotti, coordinator 
of intramural athletics and College ac- 
tivities. 

The weight room will be open from 
7 a.m. to 9 a.m. on Tuesdays and 
Thursdays. There will also be an even- 
ing schedule ~ from 4 p.m. to 5 p.m., 
Mondays through Thursdays. 

Additional information is available 
from Mrs. Fremiotti at College Ext. 
269. 
Intramural Athletics Eligibility 

1. Any hill-time or part-time stu- 
dent, faculty or staff of The 
Williamsport Area Community College 
is eligible to participate in the College's 
intramural activities. 

2. Players are eligible to enter as 
an individual participant or as a 
member of a team only once for each 
different intramural activity offered. 

3. A member of a varsity squad is 
not elibible to participate in an in- 
tramural activity which is the same 



Gym closed: floor work 

The Bardo Gym will be 
closed for an indefinite period 
of time due to refinishing work 
being done on the gym floor, 
Mrs. JoAnn R. Fremiotti, 
coordinator of intramural 
athletics and College activities, 
reported late last week. 



Sports 
Schedule 

Week of Sept. 11 to Sept. 23 

Intramural Sports 



Flag Football 
Monday: 309 Rebels vs. the winner 



Part-Time Job Openings Listed 

Information about these part-time job openings is provided by Lawrence W. Emery Jr. , direc- 
tor of counseling, career development, and placement. Additional iifformation is available from 
persons in that office, which is in the Learning Resources Center. 



sport or a related activity to which of Mean Moms and Headbangers, 5 

he/she is presently a varsity participant, p.m. 

4. Any team playing with an in- Bums vs. the winner of Swarm and 
eligible member will forfeit all events in Young Invaders, 6 p.m. 

which that person participated. Tuesday: Home Growns vs. the 

5. Any individual (participant or winner of Scumbuzzards and Old Mill, 
spectator) who acts in an unsport- 5 p.m. 



Canada Dry Bottling Co., 2120 Marydale Ave., Williamsport, would like so- 
meone to clean up from 2 to 7 p.m., four or five days a week, at $4.19 an hour 
and, after six weeks, $4.50. Call Bob Lundy at 326-1515. 

Wanted: Mother's helper. Responsible, mature person to help with laundry, 
ironing, and babysitting. Contact Ruth Simon at 326-4755. 



smanlike manner is subject to suspen- 
sion from further intramural activities. 

6. Every participant is responsible 
for knowing and adhering to ail the 
rules and regulations governing each in- 
tramural activity. 

Any questions concerning the Col- 
lege's intramural athletic program 
should be directed to the Coordinator of 
Intramural Athletics and College Ac- 
tivities in the gymnasium. 



STUDENTS... 
Why fuss? Slop by 
us and pick up a 
delicious dinner! 



BENSON 




€Ifil mini, ^ 
nMnmarket 



Corner of 3rd and Maynard Sts. 



Losers of Sept. 12 games, 6 p.m. 

Intercollegiate Sports 

Golf 

Tuesday: Bucks County Communi- 
ty College and Northampton Communi- 
ty College at Northampton County 
Community College, 1:30 p.m. 
Cross Country 

Wednesday: Wilkes-Barre at home, 
4 p.m. 

Saturday: At Philadelphia Com- 
munity College, I p.m. 



Note: The rainouts in intramural 
flag football will be made up in the 
following ways: Monday's rainouts will 
be made up on the following Wednes- 
day. Wednesday rainouts will be made 
up on the following Monday. Tuesday 
rainouts will be made up on the follow- 
ing Thursday. Thursday rainouts will be 
made up on the following Tuesday. 

All home golf and cross country 
events will be held at the White Deer 
Golf Course, eight miles south of 
Williamsport on Route 15. 



6 SPOTLIGHT Monday, Sept. 17, 1984 



Bitner becomes 
assistant director 
of personnel 

First in a Series 
Featuring '\ew' Personnel 

By Donald E. Mumford 
Of The SPOTLIGHT Staff 



Students to aid 
in hiring process 
of new dean 

The search for a new dean of 
educational services is underway, accor- 
ding to Rodney G. Hurley, dean of 
educational research. 

The position, which was vacated by 
Dr. Charles J. Cunning on Sept. 5, has 
been advertised in the Chronicle of 
Higher Education, a publication geared 
to persons involved in higher education. 

Dean Hurley said that a screening 
committee has been established to inter- 
view potential candidates for the posi- 
tion. 

Dr. Cathryn L. Addy, associate 
dean for North Campus, has been 
selected as the chairperson of the screen- 
ing committee. 

Members of the committee include 
Mrs. Veronica M. Muzic, acting direc- 
tor of the Integrated Studies Division; 
Dr. Robert G. Bowers, executive assi- 
lanl for intern' affairs; Ms. Patricia J. 
Shoff, associate professor of business 
administration, and Donald S. Shade, 
director of financial aid. 

Students will also play a role in the 
selection of a new dean, according to 
Dean Hurley. He said applicants will be 
screened and of those screened, a 
chosen few will be invited to the College 
to meet with students and Student 
Government Association represen- 
tatives. The students will later report to 
the screening committee with their opi- 
nions. Dean Hurley said. "This way, 
the students are involved in the hiring 
process," Dean Hurley said. 

Volunteers needed 



for field event 



Volunteers are needed to help the 
Girl Scouts hold a track and field event 
next Saturday, Sept. 29, according to 
Lawrence W. Emery Jr., director of 
counseling, career development, and 
placement. 

The event will be held at the South 
Williamsport Area High School from 9 
a.m. to 4 p.m. Registration is from 8:30 
to 9 a.m. Luncn will be provided. 

Students wishing to volunteer or 
gel additional information may contact 
Emery at the Counseling, Career 
Development and Placement Center, 
Room 157, Learning Resources Center, 
before this Wednesday. 



Charles A. Bitner, who has recent- 
ly become assistant director of person- 
nel at the College, attended several 
universities outside the area before 
returning to his hometown of 
Williamsport. 

After graduating from the 
Williamsport Area High School, Bitner 
entered Mansfield University, where he 
received his undergraduate degree in 
sociology and anthropology. He then 
spent six months at the University of 
South Carolina, drawn to it because of 
its size and better selection of activities, 
Bitner said. 



While there, he managed 16 male 
fraternity houses and had ambitions of 
becoming a dean of student activities, 
but instead attended Indiana University 
of Pennsylvania, where he earned his 
master's degree in industrial and labor 
relations. He said he is considering pur- 
sing a doctorate. 

Bitner first started at the College 
last January as a job analyst but was 
promoted in July to assistant director of 
personnel. 

His position entails writing job 
descriptions, observing personnel at 
their jobs, and then evaulating and 



classifying these jobs. He is impressed 
by the quality of the College's pro- 
grams, its good services, and he enjoys 
working with the faculty, he said. 

Bitner said that he believes small 
colleges like the College are advan- 
tageous in that they provide the in- 
dividual student with a better oppor- 
tunity to stand out. 

His interests include running, 
photography, and skiing. His parents 
reside in Williamsport and his father is 
the principal of an elementary school in 
the Williamsport Area School District. 



'Trek' registration forms available 

Registration forms for the Oct. 5, 
6, and 7 "Trek for Life and Breath", 
sponsored by the Central Pennsylvania 
Lung and Health Association, are 
available on Main Campus by contac- 
ting Steven T. McDonald, media techni- 



McDonald may be contacted in the 
Media Center, second floor. Learning 
Resources Center, or by telephoning 
College Ext. 219. 

The trek, which includes prizes and 



World's End State Park, Forksville. 

A session on wilderness survival 
techniques for the trek has been ten- 
tatively scheduled for 2 p.m., this Satur- 
day in the Community Room at the 
Lycoming Mall, Muncy. Trek officials 
noted that the session may be changed 
to a location at the College. 



College accepting 
job applications 

The College is accepting applica- 
tions for the following positions: 

Faculty: part-time instructors, 
physics, and men's basketball coach. 

Administrative, professional and 
technical: director of physical plant. 



McDonald noted that students of f^^" »f s""'"' services, coordinator o 

the Community College participated in foo^ service program and manager of 

the trek last year. Last year's event rais- s'"''^"' health services, 
ed $4,000 for the association's pro- 



Classified: 



receptionist/clerk, 



free food, will begin at Angel Falls at grams 'for Lycoming and Clinton Coun- ^Zl^,fl'^TJr^°l'^!J'^t 'f„T' ^^"^ 
the Loyalsock Trail and continue to ties. """ " " " """' " 

Services office opens at North Campus 

The "Displaced Homemaker" of- hopes that other agencies in the nor- 



fice was opened Sept. 6 at the North 
Campus, in Wellsboro, and the part- 
time coordinator, Mrs. Beverly McGill, 
will be gathering information this month 
in order to provide the right resources to 
women who want to re-enter the job 
market and/or update their skills. 

According to Dr. Cathryn L. Ad- 
dy, director of the North Campus, Mrs. 
McGill, of Cherry Flats, began her 
duties last Thursday and will be travell- 
ing to various boroughs and towns in 
Tioga County and talking with agencies 
and individuals to find out their most 
pressing needs. 

It was noted that a "displaced 
homemaker" is one who is divorced, 
separated, widowed, or for similar cir- 
cumstances, must return to the job 
market and needs updated skills and 
other help in order to re-enter the 
"working world". 

Dr. Addy noted that after the 
information-gathering process, the coor- 
dinator will devise programs and 
seminars that will be tailored to various 
communities. 

She added that the campus spon- 
sored a week-long workshop in June 
that was "very well attended", and it 
was decided to expand upon the services 
that could be offered to women in Tioga 
County, where the campus is located. 

The North Campus received a 
$15,000 grant from the Tioga County 
Commissioners for the program, to run 
through June 30, 1985. The funds came 
from the county's adult services block 
grant program. 

The director sees the program as a 
"catalyst" for the region and once the 
program "gets going", she said she 



them tier will "connect" with it, taking 
it over after the grant money runs out. 
Dr. Addy said she hopes that the 
program can "connect women with the 
proper resources and get them back on 
their feet". 



time clerk, veterans affairs clerk. 

The positions are open to internal 
persons (College employees) and exter- 
nal persons (those not employed by the 
College), it was noted. 

This information was provided by 
the personnal office, and applications 
are available at the office, on the second 
floor of the Lifelong Education Center 
(LEC). 



ARTIST UNLIMITED 



,^ BAKE 
W SALE 





Lobby-Academic Center 

Wed. Sept. 19 
8:00 AM to 1:00 PM 



Monday, Sept. 17, 1984 SPOTLIGHT 7 



S5WSSW5S¥S4!«SSftSS5SS%!«WSfiS¥SiSiSi^ 




The Student-Oriented 
PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT 

If experience is the growtii of f FNTl^ll 
knowledge then the experience 
that the students will gain by 
working on the Professional 
Development Center is worth a 
vast amount of knowledge! 

The center will be used for 
meetings, conferences, special 
students events, and community 
forums. 

The center was designed by 
architectural students and is being 
completed by construction 
technology students. 





Photos by 

Richard E. Kopp Jr. 

Of ne SPOTLIGHT Staff 



SGA seeking more members for this year 

Any student interested in joining the Student Government Association (SGA) this academic year should fill out the form 
elsewhere in this edition and return it to the Student Activities and Intramural Athletics Office, Room 108, Bardo Gym, or to 
the Student Office, Room AI38, Lifelong Education Center, according to Steven D. Metzker, business management student 
from Williamsport and SGA president. 

Forms will then be reviewed by the SGA Executive Committee and students will be notified, said Metzker. 

He added that faculty and staff may recommend a student, but they must complete a form and hand it in. 



SPOTLIGHT Monday. Sepl. 17. 1984 




Bill Filzsimoos perfomu tail fimoas wing walk whUe his partner, Ron Shelly, pilots Ifae 
plane. 




Up, 



up. 



The Fairchild Republic Thunderbolt II is a 
heavily-armed, highly durable aircraft designed to 
defeat potential enemy ground threats with its 
lethal arsenal, including a 30mm Catling fun 
system and laser-gnided weapons. 



Away,». 



The 1984 
Williamsport National Air Show 



Photos by 

Gisela D. Grassley 

and 

Kathleen R. Foreman 




^ JHHi 



Landing on a truck! Gary Scbroeder, of Canada, proved it 
to the spectators at the local air show. 




1^ 



I 



'Chuting star? This is one Chuting Star of a 
12-nian team which performed at the local show 
and dazzled an estimated 21,000 spectators. 



The Ray-Ban Golds are doing what they do best - stunt flying. A Canadian trio, 
they perform at major air shows in the United States and Canada. 



Special course 
developed 
for Local 812 

Individual instruction is possible 
when the College's Center for Lifelong 
Education develops a course for an in- 
dustry or concern. Presently eight 
members of the International 
Brotherhood of Electrical Workers, The 
Joint Apprenticeship and Training 
Committee, Local 812, 419 W. Fourth 
St., Williamsport, are receiving in- 
dividualized instruction at the College. 

The students are either enrolled in 
Apprenticeship Training: Electricity 
Five or Electricity Seven. Classes are be- 
ing held from 7 p.m. until 11 p.m., for 
16 sessions, through Dec. 19. Beginning 
date was Sept. 5. 

The 64^hour course provides ap- 
prentice electricians with a portion of 
the theoretical background required for 
acceptance as a journeyman. Even 
though they are placed in the same 
classroom at the same time, the size and 
nature of the class allows the instructor 
to work with students individually. 

Apprentices enrolled in Electricity 
Five learn about motor controlled cir- 
cuits, special circuits for intricate situa- 
tions, sequence control as used in in- 
dustrial production lines and the special 
appartus needed to keep the environ- 
ment safe for production personnel. 
Fluorescent lighting types and styles are 
also studied. Hazardous areas, such as 
feed mills and gas stations, are studied 
to acquaint students with the special 
electrical needs of such businesses. 
Troubleshooting electrical problems is 
included. 

Electricity Seven, an advanced 
course, includes theory on nuclear safe- 
ty, along with short review of alter- 
nating current theories. Instruction in- 
cludes sections on electronics, solid state 
electronic devices, emergency lighting 
plans for commercial and industrial 
buildings. Several lessons are dedicated 
to the metric system and formulas. 
General safety information is interspers- 
ed throughout the course. 

The College's Specialized Technical 
Education office in the Center for 
Lifelong Education develops many such 
courses each year. 

Persons interested in having such 
course developed for their employees 
can contact Grant Martin, Coordinator 
of Specialiied Technical Education. 



Keep turnin' 

the pages, 

Mrs. Brower... 

It's on Page 11! 



CEA program to be started 
at College later this month 



Monday, Sept. 17, 1984 SPOTLIGHT 9 



Courtesy College lr\formalion Office 

Persons unemployed or under- 
employed can benefit from a program to 
be offered soon by the College. Career 
Exploration for Adults (CEA) will be 
held at the College for six weeks beginn- 
ing in late September. 

The six-week program is geared to 
those individuals, 18 or over, who are 
unemployed, under-employed, looking 
for career direction, returning to the job 
market, or thinking about returning to 
school. 

No taition 

The tuition-free program offers 
assessment (of abilities and intrerests), 
values clarification, hands-on ex- 
perience in a variety of vocational 
shops, employabihty skills training (in- 
terviewing skills, resumes, cover letters), 
and communications skills training. 

According to G. Robert Converse, 
coordinator for the CEA program, the 
general goal is to enable persons with 
salable skills to develop a career plan 
and to be able to effectively market their 
skills. 

Adult training 
program set at 
North Campus 

Fifteen Tioga County residents are 
participating in computer operator 
training program that begins today at 
the North Campus, in Wellsboro, ac- 
cording to Dr. Cathryn L. Addy, direc- 
tor of the North Campus. 

The six-hour-per-day, three-week 
training program is being sponsored by 
the Tioga County's Job Training and 
Partnership Act, with residents meeting 
state qualifications guidelines in order 
to enter the program. 

Charies Dewey, of Wellsboro, who 
teaches COBOL I and II Programming 
at the campus, is instructing the course. 

The students are being trained in 
skills in order to gain employment. 

Journalism instructor 
named regional CCJA 
representative 

Anthony N. CiUo, associate pro- 
fessor of journalism, has been ap- 
pointed Eastern Regional representative 
of the Community College Journalism 
Association (CCJA) by Mary E. Hires, 
president of the organization. 

The national organization's 
Eastern Region includes Delaware, 
Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, New 
Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, 
Pennsylvania, and Vermont. 

Cillo has been a member of the 
CCJA for three years. 

The organization provides a way 
for advisors and journalism students in 
community colleges to exchange ideas, 
the advisor said. 



At the end of the program, those 
persons without salable skills should be 
able to identify training areas which 
would enable them to develop such 
skills. 

Successful in past 

The Career Exploration for Adults 
program is limited to 20 participants. 
Therefore, all interested persons are be- 
ing urged by College representatives to 
apply as soon as possible. Applications 
can be obtained by calling the Career 
Exploration for Adults Office at the 
College, Ext. 249, by this Thursday. 

The program, sponsored suc- 
cessfully at the College in the past, will 
be funded by a grant from the Penn- 
sylvania State Department of Voca- 
tional Education. A series of CEA pro- 
grams will be held between now and Ju- 
ly 1, 1985, according to Converse. 



Town Doin's 

DANCES 

Square dance... Swingin' 
Bees & Honeys with caller Russ 
Tingue at the Beehive, Yale 
Avenue, Williamsport, 8 to 10:30 
p.m. tomorrow. 

EXHIBITS 

Little League Baseball Inter- 
national Museum... on Route 
15-South, open daily from 10 
a.m. to 5 p.m. and Sundays from 
1 to 5 p.m. 

Political art... Ten years of 
graphic commentary, Lycoming 
College Art Gallery, first floor, 
Lycoming College Library, all this 
month during library hours. 

Informalion obtained from 
pamphlet of Lycoming County 
Tourist and Convention Bureau. 



You Want it. We Got it. 



nnt/iun minimarket 




12 oz. Cans 



2rn $449 



$599 



l^$469 



cookies n' cream sandwich 



All Types 

fiiii market ^^ 



SAVE 
50<= 




pogw All Types 



chps 
IVZ OZ. 

BAG 




10 SPOTLIGHT Monday, Sept. 17, 1984 



Whaddya' say...? 

Question: What are your expectations 
at the College this year? 



Location: Lifelong Education Center 

Photos by Donna IM. Barnett 

Interviews by Judltti L. Swinehart 

Both of the SPOTLIGHT Staff 





1^ 



H » li 



Sheryl L Wilkins. secretarial Elizabeth A, Capkovic, general Angie M. Olson, general studies 

science student from Lawrenceville: studies student from Williamsporl; student from Selinsgrove: "I want to 

".to gain knowledge and satislaction "...to get good grades and to be able to get a new start on life and meet a lot of 

from school." transfer to another college " new people." 





Jeffrey L. Gochnauer, dairy herd Russ D Creasy, advertising art 

management student from Canton: student from Lightstreet; ". to gel a 

"Good times " degree and a good job later." 
It 

Computer-related 'Discover' system 
added to Counseling Office resources 

The Counseling, Career Development, and Placement Office now has the 
recently-added 'Discover' system among its career resources, according to Thomas 
M. McNally, counselor. 

'Discover' is a career guidance system, he said, which uses a computer to help 
students learn about: 

- himself or herself (interests, skills, work-related values). 

~ occupations (over 400 are included in the 'Discover' data file). 

- educational/training opportunities (two-year colleges, four-year colleges, 
and graduate schools). 

Chances can be improved 

"At some point in your hfe," commented McNally, "you will be faced with 
making a serious career decision. 

"The chance that you will make a decision which will be satisfying to you will 
be greatly improved if you approach the decision in a systematic way and gather as 
much information about each alternative as possible," he added. 
Not (he Tinal decision, but... 

McNally said 'Discover' uses a systematic approach to help the individual 
make a "sound career decision". 

The system is designed, he said, to help the individual gather the information 
needed in order to make informed career decisions. "'Discover' is not meant to 
make the decision for you nor is it the final answer," he said, adding, "It is, 
however, a state-of-the-art method for gaining valuable career information." 

Students interested in using the 'Discover' system may visit the Career Center, 
Room 157, Learning Resources Center, and sign up for a time convenient to them 
to use it, he said. 



Cheryl E. Heller, accounting stu- Anthony W. Byler, tool design stu-| 

dent from Cogan Station; "I would like dent from Mifllintown: "A good educa-l 
to get good grades and a job later." tion and to meet new people " I 

Dental Hygiene Clinic hours 
expanded; open two evenings, too 



The Dental Hygiene Clinic now has 
expanded hours, according to Ms. 
Davie Jane Nestarick, acting director of 
the Health Sciences Division and coor- 
dinator for dental hygiene program. 

The clinic will be open on Tuesday 
and Wednesday evenings from 4:30 to 
8:30 p.m. It will also be open Mondays 
through Wednesdays and Fridays from 
8 a.m. to noon each day. 

The clinic, located on the fourth 
floor of the Academic Center, provides 
services to the public as well as the staff 
and students of the College. Pubhc par- 
ticipation in the clinic offers hands-on 
experience for students in dental hygiene 
procedures. 

Ms. Nestarick said a nominal fee is 
charged to help defray the cost of 
materials. Medical assistance cards are 
accepted at the clinic. 

She pointed out that those having 
work done should allow some extra time 
since students are in the learning situa- 
tion and will take longer to do the work. 

Students are supervised by the den- 



tal hygiene instructor and a dentist is 
present at all times. Six Lycoming 
County dentists supervise at the clinic 
on an alternating basis. 

Nineteen third semester students 
will be working in the clinic, according 
to Ms. Nestarick. 

The dental hygiene program at the 
College is fiilly accredited by the 
American Dental Association, she 
noted. 

Anyone interested in making an 
appointment may call College Ext. 407, 
she said. 

Bookstore offering discount 
on all tools and tool kits 

The College Bookstore inventory of 
tool kits now is being offered at a 15 
percent discount, according to Mrs. 
Eleonore R. Holcomb, Bookstore 
supervisor. 

All supplies of individual tools are 
discounted for the month of September, 
she said. 



The deadline to file a PETITION TO GRADUATE is Thursday, Oct. 4, 1984. 

U C W C IVl D C ll After that date, the fee will be $1 for late handling and the diploma will be delivered late. 
f\n A r\| I ATCO *^^'°''^ '^°* AaXa, the fee is $5 - to cover the cost of printing the diploma. It is not 
OKAUUA I tw necessary to order a diploma, BUT it is necessary to complete the PETITION TO GRADUATE 
in order for credentials to be evaluated. 



Monday, Sept. 17, 1984 SPOTLIGHT 11 



Weekend, daily hours added for Recreation Center 

Hours have been expanded for the Recreation Center in tlie Lifelong Educa- 
tion Center. Additional hours include more daily time as well as additional 
weekend time. 

According to Mrs. JoAnn R. Fremiotti, coordinator of intramural athletics 
and College activities, the Recreation Center will be open from 7 a.m. to 10 p.m. 
Mondays through Thursdays; 7 a.m. to 7 p.m., Fridays, and 11 a.m. to 7 p.m., 
Saturdays and Sundays. 



First meal in student restaurant 
to be served this evening 

Preparations were in full swing at week's end for the first meal to be served in 
the new student restaurant in the Lifelong Education Center. The first "student" 
meal will be served this evening, reported Mrs. Vivian P. Moon, associate professor 
and coordinator of the dietetic technician program. 

The student-prepared and served meals were popular last year when they were 
offered in the Academic Center in what was then dubbed the "Creative Kitchen" 
-a room adjacent to the food and hospitality management program lab-lcitchen. 
Dinner will be served at 5:50 p.m. 
Today, dinner serving will begin at 5:50 p.m. and will continue through 6:30 
p.m. Although reservations are not required, reservations will be accepted. They 
may be made by calling College Ext. 244 or 369. The price per meal is $3.50 and 
includes dessert. 

Opening menu 
The menu for the opening meal includes: 

Choice of Chilled Peach Soup or Minestra 

Salad of Autumn Greens 

Hard Rolls, Whipped Butter 

Entree choice of: 

Pasta with Bay Scallops in a Creamy Sauce 

or 

Pasta with Meat Balls, Fresh Tomato-Basil Sauce 

Herbed Zucchini Saute 

Coffee, Tea, Iced Tea, or Milk 

Dessert choice of Chocolate Amaretto Cheesecake 

or 

Icy Lemon Sorbet 





What Is It? 



tVe see 'em everyday around the Academic Center... but maybe not 
quite this close-up. Can you identify the object or subject of each 
photo? [Answers....? Next week] 




mmmmJtmmiilmii^itiAJi 





12 SPOTLIGHT Monday, Sept. 17, 1984 

BULLETIN BOARD 

For lie week of Monday, Sept. 17 through Friday, Sept. 21 
MOVIE 
"Superman III"... 7:30 this evening, Academic Center Auditorium. SI admission with 
validated student ID. $2 admission for all others. 
SPORTS 
Golf... against Bucks County Community College and Northampton County Community College, 
1:30 p.m., tomorrow, Tuesday. Sept. 18, away. 
Crosscountry... against Wilkes-Barre, 4 p.m., Wednesday, Sepl 19, home. 

MEETINGS 
Alpha Omega Fellowship... 7 to 10 p.m., tomorrow. Room 227, Academic Center. 
Sigma Pi Omega... 2 10 3 p.m., tomorrow, Susquehanna Room, . 

SPECIAL EVENTS 
Ted Sleranko... performance sponsored by the Student Government Association, Thursday, Sept. 
20, 7:30 to 9:30 p.m., Susquehanna Room, Admission free. 

BAKE SALES 
Service and Operation of Heavy Equipment Club... 8 a.m. to 1:30 p.m.,tomorrow. Academic 
Center Lobby. 
Artists Unlimited... 8 a.m. lo I p.m., Wednesday, Sept. 19, Academic Center Lobby. 



1 



Clllo's 

College Corner 

We'll prepare your 
favorite Subs and Burgers 
the way you like themi 

^Play LUCKY NUMBERS 

and 

win a half sub 

plus medium drink 

Four Winners 
Every Week 

enrol Colltje Cornn 

1100 W. Third SI.. Wllliimsporl 
|Ne»l l« Academic Center) 
^^- Phone Ahtjd: M2 U2I 
i^ Hours: 7:]0 a.m. lo 6:00 p.m. 

w 

f^ Mfinday Ihrough Friday 



Lifelong Education 
non-credit courses 
begin this week 

Non-credil courses through the 
Center for Lifelong Education are 
beginning this week, according to Mrs. 
Carol F. Kaufman, coordinator of 
campus-based programs. 

Enrollment is par with previous 
years, she noted. 

The Center for Lifelong Education 
offers non-credit courses for both adults 
and children. Many of these courses are 
given on the Main Campus, and others 
are given in various communities in the 
area. 

Information about the courses is 
available in Room 102, Academic 
Center, or Room 108, Academic 
Center. 



FREE! 

I Buy any Size Original Round Pizza at 
regular price and get the identical pizza 
free with this coupon ! 
Take Oul Only / Order Usually Ready In 10 Minutes 



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WACC sludenls additional lO^o savings 

with ID on all regular menu prices 

With This Ad Only! 



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Not valid with any other coupon 

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TED STERANKO... here this week 



Ted Steranko to perform 
at College this Thursday 



Continued from Page I 

said to Mrs. JoAnn R. Fremiotti, coor- 
dinator of intramural athletics and Col- 
lege activities. 

Steranko will also perform from 
noon to 1 p.m. in the Susquehanna 
Room, in the Lifelong Education Center 
(LECji, on Main Campus. 

Expansive reperlolre 

The "main event" will be a two- 
hour concert by Steranko from 7:30 
p.m. to 9:30 p.m. this Thursday in the 
Susquehanna Room. Admission is free. 

Steranko is originally from Reading 
and has played guitar for 10 years. He 
has appeared at hundreds of concerts at 
various colleges throughout the East 
Coast during the past seven years. 

His repertoire includes material 
from other artists such as the Beatles, 



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excellent salary, benefits include 
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9 to 5 at 322-4751 or 546-8441. 

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I Lycoming Mall, Muncv, Pa. 

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Billy Joel, Led Zeppelin, and James 
Taylor. 

Success in earlier visit 

Steranko composes his own songs, 
including 'The Commercial Song (Plop- 
Plop, Fizz-Fizz)", a satirical piece 
about commercials, and love songs such 
as "Special Lady". During his perfor- 
mance, the artist encourages audience 
requests. 

Metzker commented that Steranko 
has performed at the College before and 
has been "a great success". 

PBL picnic 
this Thursday 

The ninth annual buffet pic- 
nic of Phi Beta Lambda (PBL) 
will be held this Thursday from 
4:30 to 7 p.m. at the home of the 
PBL advisor, Paul W. Goldfeder, 
assistant professor of business ad- 
ministration. 

Maps to Goldfeder's home 
will be available at the PBL office, 
Room 3, basement, Academic 
Center. 

All business and computer 
science students interested in PBL 
may attend, the advisor said. Ac- 
tivities will include volleyball, 
frisbee, and softball. 



S potlight 

Vol 20, No. 5 D Monday, Sept. 24, 1984 D 8 Pages 
WniiimsDorl Area CommDnity College D Williamsporl, Pa. 17701 



my^w.fm!i«//:y/////yy/////i 



New certificate program 
at Natural Resources Center 

The engine service industry has experienced phenomenal growth in the last 25 
years and is expected to grow at an even faster rate in the coming years. 

In 1965, just over five million engine powered units were introduced into the 
market place. By 1979, annual air cooled engine production has grown almost 
three-limes to a total of fourteen million, averaging over one million air cooled 
engines per month. 

Consider the demand for engine service created by these sales figures. It is 
now conservatively estimated that there are more than 60 million engines in use 
which require replacement parts and/or repair work. 

The high cost of today's engine powered equipment has caused the owners of 
that equipment to seek service repair as an alternative to automatic replacement of 
worn equipment, according to the Engine Service Association. 

For the last few years, Dennis H. Rice, instructor of small engines, Glenn R. 
Spoerke, associate professor of secondary forestry students. Dr. William J. Martin, 
director of secondary vocational programs, and now retired Joseph G. Sick have 
been working a new program in the area of outdoor power equipment for post 
secondary students, Rjce said. 

Early in June, the efforts of these men paid off. The program, titled outdoor 
power equipment, was approved to begin this semester. There are currently two 
students in the program. 

This one-year program prepares students to diagnose malfunctions and to 
repair power systems commonly used by lawn mowers, riding mowers, garden trac- 
tors, chainsaws, snowmobiles, motorcycles and outboard engines. 

The program will also concentrate on bookkeeping, inventory control, writing 
shop repair orders, warranty procedures and customer relations. 

Some of the main features of the program are: large employment oppor- 
tunities, 80 percent hands-on experience and working in one of the best equipped 
facilities in Pennsylvania. 

Rice is currently the instructor for the program. He hopes to see more 
students enrolled next year. Within the next few years he would like enough 
students involved to warrant the hiring of another instructor, Rice said. 

Local band to play 
at free dance 
this Wednesday 

On Wednesday from 8 to II p.m., 
the Susquehanna Room will be the loca- 
tion of a Student Government Associa- 
tion (SGA) sponsored dance. Admis- 
sion is free and the featured band is 
Blue Steel. 

The Williamsport/Montoursville 
based band consists of members Jeff 
Hunter, lead vocals; Tom Bruder and 
Ron Lee, guitars; Tim Tyler, bass; and 
Cleatus Waldman, drums. 

According to Tyler, a business 
management student at the College, 
Blue Steel was formed two years ago. 
Tyler is the band's newest member; he 
joined three months ago. 

"I'd describe us as a contemporary 
heavy metal band," said Tyler. "We 
play songs by ZZ Top, Nightranger, the 
Scorpions, Bruce Springsteen, and John 
Cougar." 

During two to three weekly prac- 
tices, the band also works on original 
material. Blue Steel was a finalist in the 
local category of the 1983 WSQV/Miller 
■■■ Please Turn lo Page 8 




New officers of the Service and Operation of Heavy Construction Equip- 
ment Association are from left to right Jonh M. Berish, vice president, Timothy 
Owens, treasurer, Jesse E. Repash, secretary, and Eugene H. Pannenter, presi- 
dent. 

S &0 group names officers 

The Service and Operation of secretary, and Timothy Owens, of 
Heavy Constuction Equipment Associa- Clairfield, treasurer, according to 



tion elected officers last week. 

Eugene H. Parmenter, of East 
Smithfield, was elected president; John 
M. Berish, of Windber, vice president; 
Jesse E. Repash, of Hellertown, 







Randy C. Cromley of Watsontown, and Donald J. Raab, of Caslanea, are the 
first two students to be enrolled in the outdoor power equipment program. 

(SPOTLIGHT pholo by Richard E. Kopp Jr.) 

Sessions about transferring next week 

A 30-minute presentation especially for students who wish to consider 
the transferring of their credits to other colleges and institutions will be 
given next Monday and Tuesday by Thomas C. Shoff, College transfer 
counselor. 

The sessions will be held in the Academic Center Auditorium at 10:30 
a.m. and 1:30 p.m. on Monday and at 11:30 a.m. on Tuesday. 

Shoff said the "message is designed to provide students with informa- 
tion on the general process of transfer and, in addition, cover exceptions to 
the rules -often important to communitv colleae students". 



Parmenter. 

The primary objective for this year 
is preparation for a heavy equipment 
rodeo in March, Parmenter said. 

In the works are plans for taking 
several field trips to area distributors of 
heavy equipment. Members would also 
like to get involved in a community 
clean-up project, no details for this ef- 
fort have been discussed yet, the presi- 
dent said. 

The group would also like to get in- 
volved in volleyball games with other 
groups, Parmenter added. 

The 37 members of the association, 
with the other S&O students, are work- 
ing on restoring an antique road grader. 
They hope to have it finished by Spring 
or Summer of next year, Parmenter 
said. 

RIT representative to visit 
Main Campus next Monday 

Dr. John Stratton, of the Rochester 
Institute of Technology, will be on cam- 
pus next Monday to talk with students 
in electrical technology, electronics 
technology, and civil technology. 

The RIT representative will speak 
with these students in their study areas. 

Thomas C. Shoft', College transfer 
counselor, said students not enrolled in 
those programs who want to speak with 
Dr. Stratton may do so by contacting 
him, Shoff, in Room 157, Learning 
Resources Center. 



2 SPOTLIGHT Monday, Sept. 24, 1984 



No answer unless three work together 



SPOTLIGHT commentary on student liousing 



Landlords accuse students of 
destroying their property Frustrated 
students cite Itie dilapidated conditions 
of many of ttie nearby housing 
facilities- The College makes annual 
attempts to pull the first two parties 
together, but with no real progress, and 
no real authority to control the situa- 
tion. 

Student housing is a difficult, 
multi-faceted problem that has been 
the subject of numerous conversations 
and some public comment. 

The object of the three groups is 
to save money Who has the most 
need to save money? Who should we 
agree with? Who is right? 

Apparently if the current attitudes 
prevail, student housing will never be a 
"winner" either. 

The College provides students 
with a listing of about 165 rental 



places, a booklet of "how-to's". And 
some of the staff who help coordinate 
the housing list and hear housing com- 
plaints, slated that they instruct 
students look for housing early 
because, they admit, there is not 
enough good, decent housing lor 
students of the College. 

Part of the College's long range 
plan is to work with the city mayor and 
the Lycoming County Commissioners 
on a feasibility study to determine stu- 
dent housing needs. Well, that sounds 
fine, but then what? 

The only action the College can 
take for a student who is having hous- 
ing problems is if a student signs a writ- 
ten complaint at the housing section 
and if the section investigates the facili- 
ty and finds that the student is receiv- 
ing habitual bad service or abusive 
treatment, the landlord will be dropped 



from the recommended housing list. 

The College does not operate any 
type of housing and has said in the past 
that to do so would be a risk and an ex- 
pense, but it would be "willing to work 
with a private contractor to set up 
housing." 

Officials from the housing section, 
located in the Admissions Office in the 
Academic Center, noted that last year 
they tried to set up a forum between 
the students and landlords, but found 
that there was not enough interest from 
either party. 

The landlords were surveyed and 
replied that they were not Interested. 
You would think that the many student- 
generating many dollars a year in rent 
revenue would in turn generate some 
interest for those involved. 

But apparently some landlords 
have given up. Some have made 



repairs and renovated their buildings, 
but some students treat the apartment 
as if they had only one more day to 
live, and the landlords are tired of ex- 
hausting their rent income for futile ef- 
forts. 

We're not stating all students 
engage in the pastime of "Destroying 
the Apartment". But a reputation has 
preceded us. Some feel it is part of go- 
ing to college. So we all, as in high 
school and in society, must suffer 
because of the minority. 

Students, landlords, and the Col- 
lege should re-energize their attempts 
to diagnose and resolve the status of 
student housing. While the idea may 
seem fruitless to many, if someone 
tries, and organizes, and pushes, a 
positive response and some kind of 
agreement which could be beneficial to 
all just might result. 



Today's music involves creativity 

Music review by Anne Moratelll, of The SPOTLIGHT Staff 

What role does music play in today's society? 

Considering the wide variety of music in existence, many of us probably 
couldn't choose one particular type as a favorite. The reason for this is that there 
Is so much versatility in many of today's performers. For example, bands combin- 
ing big band selections from the 1 940s with today's music styles and producing a 
new sound. 

Ivlany bands are resurrecting the old favorites and giving them a new type of 
recognition. As a radio fan, listening to the old music is a great experience 
because the listener is expanding his music interests way behond Top 40 

Just listening to the radio and turning the dial from station to station, the 
listener is being exposed to jazz, classical. Top 40, "heavy metal", and the old 
favorites of the 1940s - called by some people; "torch songs". 

Music plays an Important role in the lives of people today and indeed reflects 
a mood and gets a message across. 

Today's music involves creativity. Ivlusic of today is a superb combination of 
creativity and emotion. Bands are searching for a sound that will appeal to the au- 
diences. They work with the old and new music and their audiences have the 
pleasure of enjoying these colloborations. f^usic is important to people in 
today's society because expression of teelinos and ideas is essential. 



Futuristic war: could 
it really happen to us? 

(Movie Review by Judith L. SwInehan 

In keeping with the tradition of the 
television movie, "V", the cinema- 
movie "Red Dawn", deals with an inva- 
sion, but ol a different sort. 

Drawing on the talents of little- 
known stars such as Ron O'Neal and 
Patrick Swayze, this movie deals with 
World War III unlike we would ever im- 
agine It. 

The audience is entertained by 
realistic wartime situations and 
touching emotional scenes. One might 
ask a few questions throughout the 
movie but, overall, the story is one 
worth seeing 



BLOODMOBILE 

COMING SOON 

WILL YOU LEND... 

AN ARM? 



Students extended 
invitation to worship 

To SPOTLIGHT readers. 

As president of Temple Beth Ha 
Sholom, it is my pleasure to extend an 
open invitation to any Williamsport 
Area Community College student who 
desires to practice their faith at our 
Reform Jewish services in 1984-85. 
Our regular services are on Friday 
evenings at 8 p.m. 

Our holiday services are as 
follows: Wednesday, Sept. 26, Evening 
Rosh Hashannah, 8 p.m.; Thursday, 
IVIorning Rosh Hashannah, 10 a.m.; 
Oct. 5, Kol Nidre, 8 p.m.; Oct. 6, Yom 
Kippur, morning service at 10 a.m., 
alternoon service at 3 p.m., Yizkor ser- 
vice at 4 p m., and Neilah at 5 p.m. 

With warm regards, 

Stan Wllk 
President, Temple Beth Ha Sholom 



ONLY 15 DAYS LEFT 

...Have you registered 

to vote yet? 




SPOTLIGHT 

Vol. 20. No, S 

Monday. Sept. 24, 1984 

a D D 

The SPOTLIGHT is published each Monday of the academic year, except for official 
College holidays, by Journalism and other interested students. Opinions expressed 
do not represent the oHicial opinion of the College. 

Office: Room 7, Academic Center, williamsport Area Community College, 1005 
W. Third St.. Williamsport, Pa. 17701. Telephone: (717) 326-3761, Ext, 221. 

nan 

The SPOTLIGHT is a member of the Columbia Scholastic Press Association 
ODD 
STAFF 
Donna M. Barnett, managing editor; Karen M. Metarko, editorial page editor; Rodney 
0. Hill, sports editor; Giseta D. Grassley. photography editor; Mark S. Schwanl(e. ad- 
ministrative affairs editor; James K. Morrlssey, student affairs editor; Kathryn M. 
Gilbert, advertising director; Richard E. Kopp Jr., senior staff writer. 

Staff: Wanna F. Brown, Kathleen L. Eiswert, Denise V. Enigit, Roxanne A. Goodier, 
George I. Hawli Jr., Robert W. Minier, Anne T, Moratelll, Sandra L. Musgrave, Andrew 
C. Sutryn, Judith L. Swinehart. Sandra R. Taylor. LeRoy S. Whitmlte Jr., Jennifer S. 
White, Canda M. Zinck, 

D D D 

Production Stan This Issue 

Richard E. Kopp Jr., production supervisor; Rodney D. Hill, copy editor; Denise Y. 

Enlgli, videocomposltlon; Wanna F. Brown, Robert W, Minier, Andrew C, Sutryn, 

Judith L. Swinehart, LeRoy. S. Whltmlre Jr., and Canda M. ZInck.productlon 



Monday, Sept. 24, 1984 SPOTLIGHT 3 




Brian D. Pauling, business 
management student from Selin- 
sgrove: "Yes, it will bring in more peo- 



i^»1 |,^«T 




,tviw«^^ 



# 

Kevin L. Wendt, business 
management student from Selin- 
sgrove: "Yes, because it will bring in 
more people to the state, and keep 
people from going out " 




Claudia M Hams, business 
management student from 
Williamsport: "Yes, it will bring in 
more people and more money." 



Mike P. Hakes, graphics arts stu- 
dent from Camp Hill: "Sure, why not!" 






John J. Rider, electronics student Matt E. Foltz, electronic Eric W, Huffman, broadcasting Rosetta J. Renninger. electronic 

from Williamsport: "Yes. it will bring in technology student from Camp Hill: student from Williamsport: "Yes, technology student from Williamsport: 

more money." "Yes, if someone wants to gamble it's because it will bring in more money for "No, because it takes innocent 

up to them." the state." people's money." 



Whaddya' say...? 



Question: Do you think that gambling 

shouid be legalized in Pennsylvania? 

Why or why not? 

Location: In front ol the Academic 

Center 



Photos by Richard E. Kopp Jr. 
Interviews by Anne T. Moratelll 
Both of the SPOTLIGHT Staff 



College Night to be held Oct. 15 in Bar do Gym 



College Night, designed to expose 
the residents of Lycoming County to the 
availability and possibilities of 
postsecondary education, is being held 
on Monday, Oct. 15 from 7 p.m. to 9 
p.m. Hosted by The Williamsport Area 
Community College, College Night will 
be held in the Gymiiasium on the Main 
Campus, 1005 West Third Street, 
Williamspoit. Program sponsors are 
The Lycoming County School 
Counselors Association. 

According to Michael Thompson, 
president of the Association and a 
guidance counselor at Hughesville High 
School, more than 80 colleges and 
universities will be participating in the 
program. Representatives from the in- 
stitutions will answer questions about 
housing, campus visitation, financial 
aid and costs, programs of study, ad- 
missions standards, and placement ser- 
vices. The program is free of charge 
and all persons interested in pursuing a 
postsecondary education are encouraged 



to attend. 

Scheduled to have representatives 
present are the following institutions: 

Albright College; Alliance College; 
Alvemia College; Art/Fashion Institute 
of Pittsburgh; Beaver College; 
Bloomsburg University of Penn- 
sylvania; Bucknell University; Cabrini 
College; California University of Penn- 
sylvania; Carlow College; Cedar Crest 
College; Central Pennsylvania Business 
School; Chatham College; Chestnut Hill 
College; Clarion University of Penn- 
sylvania; College Misercordia; Delaware 
Valley College; Dickinson College; East 
Stroudsburg University of Penn- 
sylvania; Edinboro University of Penn- 
sylvania; Elizabethtown College; Gan- 
non University; Geisinger School of 
Nursing; Geneva College; Gettysburg 
College; Grove City College; 
Ggwynedd-Mercy College; Harcum 
Junior College; Immaculta College; In- 
diana University of Pennsylvania; 
Ithaca College; Johnson and Wides Col- 



lege; Juniata College; Keystone Junior 
College; King's College; Kutztown 
University of Pennsylvania; LaRoche 
College; LaSalle University; Lafayette 
College; Lebanon Valley College; Lock 
Haven University of Pennsylvania; 
Lycoming College; Manor Junior Col- 
lege; Mansfield University of Penn- 
sylvania; Marywood College; Messiah 
College; Millersville University of Penn- 
sylvania; Moravian College; Mount 
Aloysius Junior College; Muhlenburg 
College. 

Also, Pennsylvania State Universi- 
ty, Philadelphia College of Performing 
Arts; Philadelphia College of Pharmacy 
Science; Point Park College; Pratt In- 
stitute; Robert Morris College; Robert 
Packer Hospital School of Nursing; 
Rochester Institute of Technology; Saint 
Francis College; Saint Vincent College; 
Selon Hill College; Shippensburg 
University of Pennsylvania; Slippery 
Rock University of Pennsylvania; Spr- 
ing Garden College; SUNY-CobleskUl 
Agricultural and Technical College; 



Susquehanna University; Temple 
University; Thomas Jefferson Universi- 
ty; University of Pittsburgh/Bradford; 
University of Scranton; Valley Forge 
Junior College; Villa Maria College; 
Waynesburg College; Wellesley College; 
West Chester University of Penn- 
sylvania; Westminister College; Wilkes 
College; Williamsport Hospital School 
of Nursing; Williamsport School of 
Commerce; Wilson College; 
Williamsport Area Community College; 
and York College of Pennsylvania. 

Thompson noted that the schools 
comprising the Lycoming County 
School Counselors Association are 
Bishop Neumann High School, 
Hughesville High School, Jersey Shore 
Area High School, Loyalsock Township 
High School, Montgomery Area High 
School, Montoursville Area High 
School, Muncy Area High School, 
South Williamsport Area High School, 
and Williamsport Area High School. 

About 1200 attend College Night 
each year. 



4 SPOTLIGHT Monday, Sept. 24. 1984 

Student operated radio station 
announces management team 

The College's sludenl-operaled radio slation has a new look this year. Accor- 
ding to Mrs. Linda J. Winiarczyk, instructor of broadcasting, the station has 
several new changes that will not only improve the station, but also provide more 
learning experiences for broadcasting students. 

The new WW AS management team for the Fall semester has been announced 
and is as follows: Wesley H. Latchford of Altoona, AGM news, sports, PSA; 
Kevin M. Mix of South Wjlliamsport, music promotion producer; Ronald J. 
Wright of Williamspon, program director; Geoffrey M. Hoover of Willjamsport, 
news director. 

David L. James of Williamsport, sports director; Cynthia M. Perry of 
Williamsport, PSA's; Robert K. Schoppe of Millerstown, promotion director; 
Christopher M. Fry of Montoursville, production; Paul A. Lange of Williamsport, 
music director; Susan F. Cowher of Millheim, traffic director. 

A sports program will air at I p.m., 3 p.m. and 5 p.m. Monday through 
Thursday and a .special sports report will air Mondays at 6 p.m. During this time 
local scores from the community and area college will be reported. 

A new addition to the station's formal is a news program, which will air at 9 
a.m., 12 p.m. and at 6 p.m. for 10 minutes. 

The WWAS daily programming will be as follows: 8 a.m. to 10 a.m. the sta- 
tion will be playing classical music. 10 a.m. to 12 p.m. there will be jazz selections. 
12 p.m. to 6 p.m. Top 40 will be played, and from 6 p.m. to 12 p.m. rock will be 
played. 

The station will be trying new techniques in the future and will not only con- 
tinue to serve their audiences, but also develop the skills in their field. 

Students attend 
factory school 

Randy C. Cromley from Watson- 
town and Donald J. Raab from 
Castanea, students of the new program, 
outdoor power equipment, attended a 
factory school at Watsontown Products 
company, according to Dennis H. Rice, 
instructor, small engines. 

A factory service representative 
from Pul/man Chainsaws was there to 
demonstrate maintenance of chainsaws. 
He lore a chainsaw apart and answered 
questions about it. 

This annual event was held on 
Sept. 12, and lasted from 9 a.m. until 2 
p.m. 

This was the first time any student 
from the College attended this event. 
Rice said. 

Younger Scholars Program 
deadline is Oct. IS 

The deadline for the Younger 
Scholars Program of the National En- 
dowment for the Humanities applica- 
tions is Oct. 15, according to Lawrence 
E. Emery Jr., director of counseling, 
career development, and placement. 

ANSWERS TO LAST WEEK'S 
WHAT IS-IT PICTURE PUZZLE 

1. Cover of College telephone diREC- 
TOry with earpiece of telephone above. 

2. Bottom of directional sign in 
Academic Center; this one tells (he way 
(without passing "GO") to Rooms 108 
and 110. 

3. Bottom of emergency number infor- 
mation sign and lop of Hre alarm box 
- fonnd at various spots on each floor 
of the building. 

4. Front end of a wall-mounted pencil 
sharpener, side view, but fiendishly 
turned sideways when presented on 
page. 

5. Decorative work inside ACC foyer 
and above front doors. 



^""nl^S?'"'' PBL to attend 
Fall workshop 



DANCES 

Square dance.. .Swingin' Bees & 
Honeys with caller Russ Tingue at the 
Beehive, Yale Avenue, Williamsport, 8 
to 10:30 p.m. tommorrow. 
EXHIBITS 

Little League Baseball Interna- 
tional Museum. ..on Route 15-South, 
open daily from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. and 
Sundays from I to 5 p.m. 

Political art. ..Ten years of graphic 
commentary, Lycoming College Art 
Gallery, first floor, Lycoming College 
Library, all this month during library 
hours. 

f 



Ten members of the Phi Beta 
Lambda(PBL) will attend a state wide 
annual Fall workshop this Sunday, 
Sept. 30, at 10 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. and 
hosted by the PBL chapter at 
Marywood College in Scranton. 

Representatives from 20 other col- 
leges in Pennsylvania will attend. Plans 
for the coming year will be discussed. 

The keynote speaker will be Mayor 
James B. McNulty. 

1 



To Alt Employees and Students... 

Free Shampoo with Blow-Dry Cut 

$6.00 Regular Price $7.50 

Dennis Buck's Hairstyling 

325 Walnut St. (3 blocks from College) 
326-3608 For Appointments 

Walk-Ins Are Welcome! 
Hours: Ivlon-Fri 9-8» Tue-Wed-Thur-Sat 9-6 




MIDNIGHT MADNESS • FRIDAY / SATURDAY 
^Starting This Weekends 



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H yes, which night have you usually attended: Friday Saturday 

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WILD LIFE/new 



Each AAovie starts at 1 2:00 



Food/hospitality group sets committees 

Several committees were selected and ideas for tlie forthcoming year were 
discussed at the first meeting of the food and hospitality club held Sept. 12, accor- 
dmg to Mrs. Vivian P. Moon, associate professor and coordinator of the die'tic pro- 
gram. 

The meeting was directed by Gene R. Mader, of Flemington, president The 
rest of the officers are Barb E. Elling, of Lock Haven, secretary,Regina M 
Krumenaker, of Williamsport, treasurer. 

Named head of the committee to improve "lack of communication" in the kit- 
chen department is Ms. Elling. 

Presently, the club is planning a trip to New York City to attend the Interna- 
tional Hotel and Restaurant Show. Selected to head that committee is Karen C 
Daniels, of Williamsport, Sue C. Bennett of Duboistown, and Sandra J. Thurston 
of Athens. A committee has also been chosen to organize a department Christmas 
party. Dixie G. Laudenslager, from Williamsport, was selected chairman Karen 
Daniels from Williamsport, and Rollie Sitler, from Danville make up the rest of the 
committee. 

Plans are currently underway for a breakfast "mixer" for first year students to 
be held at 7:15 a.m., this Wednesday in the Susquehanna Room, Lifelong Educa- 
tion Center. Nancy L. Conroy, food and hospitality management student from 
WilliamsDort. is in charge of that committee. 



Monday, Sept. 24, 1984 SPOTLIGHT 5 




In 'basiness': Mrs. Donna G. Pfeufer 



ACROSS 
1 Dinger 
6 Pan of >t«p 

11 Mock 

12 Wranaway 

14 Preposition 

15 Unadorned 

17 Fiber plant 

18 Perform 
20 Go In 

22 Youngster 

23 Unit of Italian 
currency 

25 Drain 

27 French 
pronoun 

28 Strikes 
30 Swiftly 

32 Country of 
Asia 

34 Tardy 

35 Train of 
attendants 

38 Bread 
Ingredient 

41 Mar\% 
nickname 

42 Sweetheart: 
arch. 

44 Wild plum 

45 Plunge 
47 Yellowish 

organic 
substance 

49 Transgress 

50 Mine 
entrance 

52 Nerve 
networks 

54 Army officer; 
abbr. 

55 Part of eye 
57 Habituates 
59 Shoulder 

covering 

ao Scraped 

together 

DOWN 



Implement 

2 Teutonk: 
deity 

3 Tew 

4 Unemployed 

5 Inclines 

6 Restoration 

7 Negative 
prefix 

6 Soak up 
9 Redact 

10 Sell to 
consumer 

1 1 Watch faces 
13 Gloomily 

16 Roman road 
19 Character- 
istic 
21 Remunerate 
24 A month 
26 Ceremonies 
29 More rational 
31 Transactions 
33 Denoting 

number 

35 Detecting 

device 



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JOMSUV AlZZHd 



36 Slurs 

37 Comfort 

39 Dirtied 

40 Temporary 
shelters 

43 Potassium 

nitrate 
46 Substance 
48 One ol 



Columbus's 

ships 
51 Aunt in 

Madrid 
53 Diving bird 
56 Compass 

point 
58 Note of 

scale 



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Timing was right: she begins teaching here 



B; Richard E. Kopp Jr. 
Of The SPOTLIGHT Staff 

Two events occurring at the same 
time have brought Mrs. Donna G. 
Pfeufer to the College 

First, her husband, William J. 



Pfeufer, who works for GTE Sylvania ray State University in Murray, Ky. 

was transferred to the Montoursville where she completed her undergraduate 

plant when the plant in Troutman, N.C. studies. 
*as closed. She was then hired by GTE 

Second, Robert L. Lyons, assistant Sylvania, where she worked in a 

professor of retail management left the management position. After three years 

College to re-enter the business world, there, Mrs. Pfeufer went to the Univer- 

Hence, we have Mrs. Pfeufer at the sity of Tennessee at Martin, Tenn. and 

College. obtained a master's degree in business 

Originally from Hopkinsville, Ky. administration, She then taught 

and most recently from Troutman, economics at Martin for two years. 
N.C, Mrs. Pfeufer has lived in Mon- Mrs. Pfeufer teaches business and 

toursville since January. "We like it; retail management courses and is also a 



^?h'f.m-| ^T'l'^f \"'^°'^ '"^"^ l«g'. *' s^d "I ^ fe^ly enjoying the 
!h Jr>^ "'"''f^vf"? "I'^r"' College situation here. I find it a good 
and senior years of high school in Ken- 

tucky. 

Mrs. Pfeufer first attended the 
University of Kentucky at Lexington. 
After two years, she transferred to Mur- 



it's nice here," she noted. 

She and her husband have two 
boys, David, who is 13 and in the eighth 



faculty adviser for the retail manage- 
ment students. She teaches five classes. 
Asked how she felt about the Col- 



institution to work with. Everyone has 
been extremely helpftil." 

Tutoring Center 
receives grant 

A vocational education disadvan- 
tage grant has been received by the 
Tutoring Center, according to Diana 
Kuhns, coordinator of the Tutoring 
Center, 

According to Ms. Kuhns, the grant 
will be used to hire more tutors in the 
technical fields, and to explore a 
number of different areas. 

Tutors are available now for elec- 
tronics, drafting, machine tool 
technology, and computer science. 

Schedules of tutoring times are 
available at the Tutoring Center. 



Individualized Learning 
Center sets new hours 

New hours have been set for the In- 
dividualized Learning Center and the 
Computer Science Laboratory, accor- 
ding to Dr. Donald B, Bergerstock, 
director of the Computer and Business 
Science Division 

The hours are: 

ILC - 7:30 a,m, to 9:30 p.m., 
Mondays, Tuesdays, and Thursdays; 
7:30 a.m. to 8 p.m., Wednesdays. 

CSL- 7:30 a.m. to 11 p.m., Mon- 
days through Thursdays; 7:30 a.m. to 
10:30 p.m., Fridays; 7:30 a.m. to 5:30 
p.m., Saturdays, and 1 to 10 p.m., Sun- 
days. 

Library open Sundays 

The library is now open on Sun- 
days from 2 p.m. to 9 p.m. according to 
Mrs. Kate D. Hickey, librarian. 

Regular hours are still as follows: 
Monday through Thursday from 8 a.m. 
to 9 p.m. and Fridays 8 a.m. to 8:30 
p.m. The library will be closed on 
Saturdays. 




Church of the Annunciation 

410 Walnut Street 

(Corner of West Fourth and Walnut Sts.) 

Telephone: 323-9456 

Msgr. William J. Fleming, V.F., Pastor 

Falher Richard J. Loch, Assl, 

Father Bert S. Kozen, Asst, 

Falher Joseph D. Gilbert, in residence 

Shepherd. I know Mine and Mine know Me . . . for these I will give My life. " - Jol 



Schedule of Services 
weekend masses: 

Saturday Evening - 4 P.M. and 5:30 P.M. 

Sunday Morning - 7:30, 9:00, 10:15, and 11:30 A.M. 

Sunday Aflernoon - 5:00 P.M. 
DAILY MASSES: 

7:00 and 8:00 A.M. and 12:10 P.M. (except Saturday) 
SACRAMENT OF CONFESSION: Saturday, 4:45 to 5:30 P.M. 
or by appoinlmenl. 



6 SPOTLIGHT Monday, Sepl. 24, 1984 

Creative Kitchen to serve lunch 

Beginning next Monday, students involved in "Creative Kitchens" will serve 
lunch Monday through Friday, according to Mrs. Ann Miglio, associate professor 
of food service and hospitality. 

Lunch will be served from 1 1 a.m. to 1 p.m. daily with a menu of speciality 

Mrs. Molly C. Sawchuk, food coordinator, said that for Monday and Wednes- 
day lunches, reservations will be required. 

However they will not be needed for Tuesday, Thursday and Friday lunches. 
Mrs. Sawchuk noted that in addition to the regular menus, daily specials will 

be offered. ■ j „ u j 

"At the present time, prices have not been determined, she saia. 
The lunches will be prepared by Howard R. Milan, faculty instructor, and 

Mrs Judith Patsche, quantity foods service instructor. 

Reservations for the lunches may be made by calling Ext. 369 from 9 a.m. to 

10 a.m., Monday through Friday. 

Part-Time Employment Tips 

From Counselinj, Career Development and Placemen! Office 
HELP NEEDED IN THE SUSQUEHANNA ROOM - Food line 
server, kitchen helper, dish room attendant, and cashiers: all part-time 
and suitable for slodenls. Apply in the Personnel Office, LEG. 

FOOD SERVICE WORKER-SANITATION from 3:45 p.m. to 
7:45 p.m. al The Williamsport Hospital (position may be fiUed by 
pablication dale, but...) Applications will be accepted on Wednesday and 
Thnrsdav from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. in the hospital personnel office or in the 
hospital main lobby anytime for other openings as they become available. 



Women's Forum 
meets Wednesday 

The Women's Forum, an organiza- 
tion for women students, faculty, and 
staff, will hold an organizational 
meeting at noon, Wednesday in Room 
A113, Lifelong Education Center. 

According to Mrs. Kathryn A. Fer- 
rence, career development specialist, 
who co-advises the club, discussion will 
focus on membership, officers, and 
planning events to sponsor during the 
current academic year, including the an- 
nual "Women's Week", a week of 
events in March. Mrs. Veronica M. 
Muzic, acting director of the Integrated 
studies division, is also the club's co- 
adviser. 

The club was approved as a student 
organization last May and formed last 
Fall with the purpose of encouraging 
more involvement by students in areas 
related to women. 

Working as a support, educational 
and special interest gruop, the organiza- 
tion acts as an information center for 



the personal and professional develop- 
ment of students, faculty, and staff, and 
helps members grow to use their talents 
and skills, according to the club's con- 
stitution. 

Mrs. Ferrence said those who want 
to attend the meeting but have other 
committments may contact her in Room 
156, Learning Resources Center, or 
telephone College Ext. 398. 

Library employs 
new cataloger 

Chester Y. Sun of Williamsport 
started full-time employment at the Col- 
lege Hbrary as a cataloger, according to 
Mrs. Kate D. Hickey, librarian. 

Sun's duties will be to work in the 
reference section when needed and work 
Wednesday nights, said Mrs. Hickey. 
Sun had worked previously at the Blue 
Ridge Community College in West 
Virginia. 

He trained work study students 
while he worked his regular job as a 
cataloger for 15 years. 



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f^nt market 



Corner of Srd and Maynord Sts. 



Always Open: 
All Night 
Sundays 
and Holidays 



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259 




Monday, Sept. 24, 1984 SPOTLIGHT 7 




The Sidelines Strength development program offered 



Sports Commentary 

By Rodney D. Hill 

SPOTLIGHT Sports Editor 



MV/^NAMK/MNon/ 1 ni I W*4 • uiiUiMIUM.1 *41*< ''M" "MM><' 



The leaves are falling and the days 
are growing colder and shorter, which 
for many people means the anticipation 
of the upcoming hunting season. 

Hunting is just not grabbing a bow 
or a gun and heading for the woods. 

A hunter should pre-plan a hunting 
expedition and consider all the possible 
things that could go wrong, such as get- 
ting lost and spending the night in the 
woods, or an accidental discharge of a 
firearm, and inflicting self injury or in- 
juring another person. 

Some good advice would be to in- 
clude a kit that would make such hap- 
penings bearable and ease the discom- 
fort that might be created. 

A good "survival" kit would con- 
tain items such as a first aid kit (ban- 
dages, gauze, alcohol, etc.) and mat- 
ches, to start a camp fire if the hunter 
should happen to get lost. 

Archery season is the first of the 
big game seasons. I consider it the 
safest of all seasons for obvious reasons. 
Because of the fact that an arrow does 
not have the impact that a bullet has, 
the chances are greater that an injury 
will not occur. 

Although the chances are good that 
injuries will not occur, those same 
reasons also are credited to the 
"slaughter" of the deer population, 
(normally an arrow will not kill a deer 
when first hit, and in a lot of cases deer 
will escape being caught and will even- 
tually die or become contaminated). 

The small game season inter-locks 
with archery season for about a week or 
two. Some hunters will make good time 
for their hunting by archery hunting 
during the most desired times, which is 
morning and evenings, and they will 



break in between the two time periods, 
by hunting the small game during the 
afternoon. 

I personally do not enjoy small 
game, because it's pretty hard to shoot 
those little critters. I often wondered 
how many hunters actually put their 
small game on the dinner table? Not 
many I'll bet. Are they really sincere 
with the meat, or are they just trying to 
develop more hunting skills? 

The climax of the hunting season is 
of course, buck season. By this time the 
deer are pretty well spooked and the 
chances are slim to none of making that 
long time dream come true. 

The buck season is with no doubt, 
the most dangerous time to be in the 
woods. The first week, a heavy 
populated hunting area generates a lot 
of shooting, but there is no deer to ac- 
count for the shooting. Most of those 
shots are because the hunters see move 
ment, hear sounds that resemble the 
noise of deer, or just simply, shoot 
desperation shots. 

Buck season is not the time to lack 
judgement, because a bullet will travel 
quite a distance and will increase the 
chances of injuries or fataUties. We 
should also be aware of the other people 
in the woods, because there are a lot of 
"crazies" out there. 

We should remember one impor- 
tant thing, this coming hunting season 
has been long waited for. The time that 
a person is about to commit to the 
season, is probably meant for relaxing 
and having some fun, so let's keep those 
thoughts in mind and use good judge- 
ment prior to the season and during the 
season. Otherwise, it may be a disap- 
pointing and regretting season. 




OFF TO A MEET - Members of the College's cross country team step off to a 
meet at the While Deer Golf Course, but there was no competition. The meet 
had been scheduled against Wilkes-Barre, but "due to lack of participaters" from 
Wilkes-barre, the meet was cancelled, according to Harry C. Specht, assistant 
professor of physical education and College athletic director. {SPOTLIGHT pholo 
by Richard E. Kopp Jr./ 



A stren^h development clinic will be sponsored by the Intramural Athletics 
and College Activities Office and the Center for Lifelong Mucation, according to 
Glen I. Korobov, College evening activities assistant. 

The program is designed for both men and women, said Korobov. 

Classes will be divided for the men and women and each participant will take 
two 60-minute classes. The first of the two classes will be an introductory course 
and the second class will be the actual workout and critique. 

Anyone interested must sign up at least two days in advance, he said. Class 
size will be limited, he added. 

Therefore, for the first set of classes, the deadline for men is this Wednesday. 
For women, the deadline is today. 

Additional information is available from Korobov or Mrs. JoAnn R. Fremiot- 
ti, coordinator of intramural athletics and College activities, in Room 108, Bardo 
Gym, or by telephoning College Ext. 269. 

East and West 
changes names 

The Eastern Pennsylvania Com- 
munity College Athletic Conference has 
become the Eastern Pennsylvania Col- 
legiate Conference (E.P.C.C.) effective 
as of Aug. 7, 1984. 

The E.P.C.C. is comprised of nine 
two-year colleges - eight community 
colleges and one Penn State campus ~ 
located in the eastern portion of the 
state. E.P.C.C. members include the 
following community colleges; Bucks, 
Delaware, Lehigh, Luzerne, Mon- 
tgomery, Northampton, Philadelphia, 
Williamsport, and Penn State-Qgontz. 

The change was made in conjunc- 
tion with the western Skyline Con- 
ference, which has made the change to 
the Western Pennsylvania Collegiate 
Conference (W.P.C.C). The W.P.C.C. 
is made up of 10 two-year colleges ~ six 
community colleges and four Penn State 
institutions. 

The East and the West have been in 
existence since 1970 snd 1972 respective- 
ly. A newly-formed Pennsylvania Col- 
legiate Athletic Association will govern 
all-state championships. State cham- 
pionship competition began in 1979. 

State championships now are held 
in 10 sports: soccer, cross country (men 
and women), golf, volleyball, men's and 
women's basketball, tennis, softball, 
and baseball. 

The commissioner of the P.C.A.A. 
is Chuck Ross, athletic director, Beaver 
County Community College, Monaca. 

The name changes were made to 
provide a more clearly defined image of 
where the participating colleges are 
located. It will also heighten the com- 
petitive nature of the state champion- 
ships by having the eastern champion 
and the western champion compete not 
only for individual and conference titles, 
but for state and geographic supremacy, 
according to officials of the conference. 

Low water temperature 

Fall is here and the warm days of 
summer have faded. Fall is a season 
that a lot of people look forward to. 

This is the time of year when most 
of us fishing fanatics catch the fever. 
Fish are becoming more active due to 
the lowering water temperature and this 
means excellent fishing. 

Most people do not know of the ex- 
tended trout season. Anglers can usual- 
ly count on having a stream all to 
themselves. (Check rules and regula- 
tions for creel limits and approved trout 



Sports 
Schedule 

Week of Sept. 24 to Sept. 30 

Intramural Sports 



Flag Football 

Monday: 309 Rebels vs. Mean 
Moms. 5 p.m. 
Home Crowns vs. Scumbuzzards, 6 

p.m. 

Tuesday: Bums vs. the winner of 
Swarm and Young Invaders, 5 p.m. 

Headbangers vs. the loser of 
Swarm and Young Invaders, 6 p.m. 



Intercollegiate Sports 

Golf 

Monday: At Montgomery County 
Community College. 

Friday: Bucks County Community 
College and Luzerne County Communi- 
ty College at home, 1:30 p.m. 
Cross Country 

Tuesday: Pennsylvania State 
University, Hazleton Campus, at home, 
4 p.m. 

Note: The rainouts in intramural 
flag football will be made up in the 
following ways: Monday's rainouts will 
be made up on the following Wednes- 
day. Wednesday rainouts will be made 
up on the following Monday. Tuesday 
rainouts will be made up on the follow- 
ing Thursday. Thursday rainouts will be 
made up on the following Tuesday. 

All home golf and cross country 
events will be held at the White Deer 
Golf Course, eight miles south of 
Wilhamsport on Route 15. 

produces excellent fishing 

waters). Bass, Pike and Muskies will be 
feeding for the winter. So expect action 
if you go for these lunkers. Remember 
to always check your rule book for cor- 
rect size and limits, they may vary from 
one region to another. So if you are 
one who has caught the fever, there is 
only one cure, round up your fishing 
tackle, find an excellent lake or stream 
and catch a lunker. 

Those interested in forming a fall 
fishing club may contact Lee Whitmire, 
SPOTLIGHT office. Room 7, ACC. 



8 SPOTLIGHT Monday, Sept. 24. 1984 

Free skating set 
For Thursday 

Rollerskating, sponsored by the 
Student Government Association 
(SGA), is scheduled for 8 p.m. to mid- 
night Thursday at Skating Plus, located 
at the corner of Via Bella and William 
Streets, downtown Williamsport. 

"The event is free for students with 
a currently validated College identifica- 
tion card," according to Mrs. JoAnn R. 
Fremiotti, coordinator of intramural 
athletics and College activities. "The 
fee is $2 for all others." 

Mrs. Fremiotti added that no 
tickets need be purchased in advance 
and that skates are available for rental 
for 75 cents. 



1 



Ciilo's 

College Corner 

We'll prepare your 
favorite Subs and Burgers 
the way you like ttiem! 



Play LUCKY NUMBERS 

and 

win a tialf sub 

plus medium drink 

Four Winners 
Every Week 




Clllo'i Colltge Corner 
1100 W. Tllitdlil., Wllliiniiporl 



BULLETIN BOARD 

For the week of Monday, Sept. 24 through Fridav, Sept. 28. 

MOVIE 
"Richard Pryor, Here and Now"...l:V) this evening. Academic Center 
Auditorium, SI admission with validated College ID. $2 admission for all others. 

SPORTS 
Cross Counrrc... against PSU Hazleton, 4 p.m., tomorrow, home. 
Co^... against Montgomery County Community College, away, 1:30 p.m., today. 
Coi^... against Bucks County Community College and Luzerne County Community 
College, 1:30 p.m., Friday, home. 

MEETINGS 
Student Government Association... (> p.m., tomorrow, Room 118 Building Trades 
Center. 

Alpha Omega Fellowship...! to 10 p.m., tomorrow. Room 227, Academic Center. 
Service and Operation of Heavy Equipment Club. ..6.i0 p.m., Thursday, Sept. 27, 
Room 402, Academic Center. 

Phi Beta Lambda ...i:\5 p.m., tomorrow. Room 329, Academic Center. 
Sigma Pi Omega.. .4 p.m., Thursday, Sept. 27, Room A121, Lifelong Education 
Center. 

Women 'ffora/n... organizational meeting, noon, this Wednesday, Sept. 26, Room 
AII3, Lifelong Education Center. 

SPECIAL ACTIVITIES 
Rollerskating... i p.m. to midnight, this Thursday, Sept. 27, at Skating Plus. $2 ad- 
mission or free to faculty, staff, and students with validated College ID; skate ren- 
tals 75 cents. Sponsored by the Student Government Association. 

SPECIAL EVENT 
Dance. ..i to II p.m., this Wednesday, Sept. 26, Susquehanna Room. Admission 
free. Featured band is Blue Steel. Sponsored by the Student Government Associa- 

BTllore offers discount ^OCOl band tO pltty 

on selected clothing items Qf free donCe 

The Bookstore is increasing its dis- ^ , j / _ d >•- 
... r • r- Conlinuea from Page /■■■ 

count on selective pieces of clothmg, ac- 
cording to Eleonore R. Holcomb, 
Bookstore supervisor. 

The total of the discount will reach 
40 percent and the sale will last through 
this month. 



Creative Kitchen Menu 

"Creative Kitchens"will be serving 
its weekly meal tonight from 5:30 to 
6:30 p.m. in the student restaurant, ac- 
cording to Mrs. Ann Miglio, associate 
professor of food service and hospitali- 
ty. Reservations will be accepted by 
calling College Ext. 244 or 369. Price 
per meal is $3.50 with desert. 

Menu for Sept. 24 

Choice of: Italian Wedding Soup 
or 
Gaspacho Soup (cold) 

Romaine Lettuce, Orange & Onion 
Salad 

Chicken Saltimbocca 
(ham, cheese & tomato wrapped in 
chicken breast) 



ATTENTION BEER DRINKERS 

Tap system in Refrig/Freezer 
All yon need is the Keg and 
$150 or Best Offer 
Works Like a Champ! 
Call Jim at 326-4148 



High Life "Rock to Riches" talent con- 
test and appeared on a locally released 
mini-album from it. 

Tyler speculated upon the group's 
future plans to "keep practicing and 
work on more originals for a 
demonstration disc". As to the im- 
mediate future. Blue Steel will play three 
45-minute sets with a combined total of 
approximately 30 to 40 songs at 
Wednesday's dance. 



Risi E Bisi 
(seasoned rice) 

Broccoli Goldenrod 

Fresh Cranberry Relish 

Cresent Rolls 

Desert: ala carte I 

Hot Capnoli I 

(ice cream crepes with chocolate sauce) I 

Second floor of gym closed 

The second floor of the gym will be 
closed until approximately Oct. I, ac- 
cording to Lawrence P. Smeak, super- 
visor of security. 

"The gym is being painted.and it 
is estimated that it will take that long to 
cure properly, " Smeak said. 



FREE! 

Buy any Size Original Round Pizza at 

regular price and get the identical pizza 

free with this coupon ! 

Take Out Only / Order Usnally Ready in 10 Minutes 



WACC sludenls additional 10% savings 

with ID on at) regular menu prices 

Wilb This Ad Only! 



LITTLE CAESARS 
GIANT PLAZA, GOLDEN STRIP 

327-8600 




■C- 1983 Lmie Caesar Entdprises. Inc 

valuable coupon HH ^Hj I 




ICE 

CREAM 

SALE 

TODAY 

Noon to 2 p.m. 

Chocolate and Vanilla 
First floor of the Academic Center 
(Straight through the lobby) 

Sponsored by the Horticulture Assn. 

""""" ■'■■'■'■'■■"■"■•''■•■•iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii„„„„i,„ 



Spotlight 





MONDAY, OCT. 1, 1984 

VOL. 20, NO. 6 

8 PAGES 

WUIiimsport Area CommDnity College 
Williamsport, Pi. 17701 



Dennis L. Masorti...see pages 4 & 5 



College's 
cross country 
team wins 
opening meet 



:W::y:-:::-K-v-:&:>»:M::M:»»v:>>:::::x::> 

The College's cross country team won its opening meet against the Penn- 
State Hazelton campus, by the margin of one point, 27-28, last Tuesday, Sept. 25. 

The first spot in the standings went to Wayne M. Pariitt, an auto body student 
from Pottsville. Parfitt's time was recorded at 27:30. 

The other place winners were: third place, Bradley I. Alden, an aviation 
technology student from Tunkanock; fourth place, Warren P. Renninger, a nursery 
management student from Williamsport; ninth place, Gregory S. Lange, an ac- 
counting student from Lock Haven; tenth place, James D. Cramer, an automotive 
student from Cleona and 13th place was William E. Riggs Jr., an electronics 
technology student from Williamsport. 

Phillip D. Landers, associate professor of business administration, said the 
outlook for the men's team is "potentially a very good team, depending on injuries 
and sickness.'" 

Landers said since 1977 the College's cross country team have finished either 
first or second in league standing in dual meet competition. Their combined record 
since 1977 is 25-5 in duals and 34-8 in overall competition. In 1978 and in 1982 
they had undefeated championship seasons 



Voter 

registration 
drive this week 



The League of Women Voters will 
conduct an on-campus voter registration 
drive from 9 a.m. to 8 p.m., today and 
Wednesday, in the Lifelong Education 
Center foyer. 

The drive is sponsored by the Stu- 
dent Government Association (SGA), 
said Mrs. JoAnn R. Fremiotti, coor- 
dinator of intramural athletics and Col- 
lege activities. 

She added that one need not be a 
resident of Lycoming County to register 



to vote. 

"The potential voter merely needs 
to be 18 years old and a U.S. citizen," 
said Mrs. Fremiotti. 

"I encourage students," she add- 
ed, "to register so they can participate 
in the November election. Any responsi- 
ble citizen should be registered to vote." 

It was also noted that voter 
registration cards are available in the 
Phi Beta Lambda office. Room 3, base- 
ment, Academic Center. 



laSPOTUGHTOMoDdi;, Oct. 1, I9S4 

A time 
to snack 

SPOTLIGHT commentary 

We've become addicted lo snacks 
in between classes, both during the 
daytime and during the evening. There 
are several locations lo get snacl<s. but 
there's the question of time. 

With 10 minutes between classes, 
there usually isn't the time lo go pur- 
chase the snack and consume it and 
still make class That snack gives a lit- 
tle bit of relaxation or a little bit of quick 
energy. 

Automated snack centers in 
various buildings would be convenient 
and, maybe, profitable. 

Reading 'Godplayer' 

makes one leery 

of hospitals 

DDOSPOTLIGHT Book Review 

Robin Cook is well-l(nown for his 
books, "Coma", "Brain", "Fever" 
and most recently, "God Player". 

"God Player" is a nation-wide 
best-seller and has received excellent 
reviews. 

Cook has been quoted as "claim- 
ing the crown of the king of medical 
thrillers". 

The author has the credentials to 
write medical thrillers. He was a 
graduate of Columbia Medical School, 
and has first-hand knowledge of the 
medical profession. This is one of the 
reasons why his books are so realistic. 

After reading this book one hopes 
never to have to spend a day in the 
hospital. And it is not recommended to 
give this book to a friend in the 
hospital... but possibly to an enemy. 



Letter writer: contact us 

We have received a letter to the 
editor concerning a recent police raid. 
The editorial page editor would ap- 
preciate the writer coming to the 
SPOTLIGHT office In order to verify the 
signature and the letter. 



Students' input 
needed: sports 
should be kept 

SPOTLIGHT commentary on 
College sports 

With "lack of parlicipation" and "lack 
of student enthusiasm in the form of 
spectatorship" cited, there is a 
possibility that the remaining inter- 
collegiate spOrts at the College may be 
cut from the budget 

Students need lo say that the inter- 
collegiate athletics program is a wor- 
thwhile one and that it should be con- 
tinued. 

The intercollegiate sports program 
could benefit the College in several 
ways. There are those who enroll with 
one eye to a sports program. There is 
the need to provide a physical outlet. 
There is the possibility of communica- 
tion with students in other parts of the 
state. For some, these sports provide a 
productive after-class activity. 

We know the intercollegiate sports 
program costs money. Right now, 
$1 8,000 is used for the Intercollegiate 
sports program. Ivlaybe those in- 
terested ought lo get together and 
come up with ways to get the most out 
of that money. 

And, students who are interested 
must let their opinions be known about 
what sports are popular, why they do 
or don't "participate" or "get en- 
thusiastic" about the teams, and about 
not having an intercollegiate sports 
program. 

Those opinions could be given in 
the activities office or the athletics of- 
fice In the gym. 

Heartwarming show 
recommended for all 

DDDSPOTLIGHT TV review 

Every Sunday evening at 7:30 on 
Channel 3, Soleil (vioon Frye plays 
Punky Brewster, a young girl abandon- 
ed by her mother. Along with her dog, 
Brandon, she wins the heart of Henry 
(George Gaynes), a lonely apartment 
manager. 

The show is a warm and loving 
comedy that is recommended not to be 
missed. This is one program that can 
be enjoyed by viewers of all ages. 



SPOTLIQHT 
Monday, Oct. 1, 1984 - Vol. 20, No. 6 

The SPOTLIGHT Is published each fwlonday morning ol the academic year, ex- 
cept (or College vacations, by journalism and other Interested students of The 
Wllliamsport Area Community College. 

Otflce: Room 7, Academic Center. 1005 W Third SI, Wllliamsport. Pa 



17701 Telephone, (717) 326-3761. Extension 221 



Opinions expressed are those o( the student newspaper or o( those whose 
names accompany Items, Opinions do not re(lec( oKlclal opinion o( the Institution 



THE STAFF 
Donna M. BarnaH, Managing Editor: Karen M Melarko. Edilonal Page Editor 
GIseia Qiassley. Photography Editor; Marl< S Schwanke, Administrative Allairs 
Editor: Jaiims K. Morrissey, Studenl Atlaiis Editor: Kalhryn M Gilbert, Advertising 
, Spoors Editor: Richard E Kopp Jr , Senior Stall Writer. 



Manager: Rodney D 



HEPOBTERS/STAFF ASSOCIATES 

Wanna F Brown. Melanle S Callahan. Kathleen L. Eiserl Kathleen R 
Foreman, Roxanne A Goodier, George I Hawk, Robert w r«1lnier Anne T 
Moratelll. Donald E Mumlord. Sandra L l^usgrave. Andrew C Sutryn Judith L 
Swinehart, Sandra R Taylor, James E. Treeso, Jenniler S While LeRov S Whit- 
mire Jr.. Candalvl, Zinck. 

Faculty adviser: Anthony N. Cillo. 




TO HELP VOTERS - Pat Keig and Mary Krutson, representing American 
Association University Women, (AAUW), Williamsport branch, are on hand for 
(hose needing assistance on voter registration, today and Wednesday from 9 a.m. 
to 8 p.m., in (he Lifelong Education Center foyer.See story, Page 
hlSPOTUCHT photo by Gisela D. Grassley. of the SPOTLIGHT staff.] 



Part-Time job Openings Listed 

Informalion about parl-lime jobs is provided by Lawrence tV. Emery, director of 
Counseling, Career Development, and Placement. Additional information is available 
from persons in that office which is in the Learning Resources Center. 



Floral design and sales at Nature's Design in the Susquehanna Valley Mall, 
1 5-20 hours per week. If interested call Mike Finn at 374-9967. Would be suitable 
for Florticulture co-op. 

Greenhouse worker in Selinsgrove, should have knowledge of farm machinery. 
$3.35 an hour-15-20 hours per week. Suitable for Nursery Management of Flor- 
ticulture co-op. Call Mike Finn at 374-9967. 

Meat processing pjant clean-up persons, 6 to 10 p.m., three nights a week, two 
or three students. For more information call Charlie Missigman at 326-9722. 

Jeans West in the Lycoming Mall would like to hire a retail management stu- 
dent to work part-time beginning the middle of October and until after the first of 
the year. Fill out application at the store. 

Penn Real Estate Co. would like an advertising art student to design a logo for 
their signs and stationary. If interested send a letter of appUcation to P.O. Box 
665, WUHamsport, Pa. 17701. 

Williamsport Country Club will be needing cooks after first of month, also 
dishwashers from 5 or 6 p.m. until midnight, five days a week. Call Connie at 
323-3709. 

YMCA Child Care Center has opening for an aide to work 9-11:30 a.m. and 
3-4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday, $3.50 per hour. To apply, call 323-7134. This 
could be used for internship in social studies. 



Coantry Kitchen 
October 1, 1984 

Refreshing Lime Punch 

or 

Hot Chicken Vegetable Soup 

or 

Country Baked Flounder 

And Baked Potato with Sour Cream and Chives 

Savory Green Beans 

Fresh Apple Pie A La Mode 



SPOTLIGHTOMondiy, Oct. I, 1984rj3 



More groups endorse sponsorship plan 

students, faculty, staff urged to write to commissioners 



Many public county agencies have been making their views concerning the 
county-college sponsorship issue known. 

Recently the board of directors of the Williamsport-Lycoming Chamber of 
Commerce unanimously voted to suppon the sponsorship proposal. The chamber 
approval is dependent on the following considerations: 

-The school districts presently involved with sponsorship must remove their 
expenditures for the College from their respective budgets and adjust the tax re- 
quirements accordingly. 

-The College must locate sponsors from other sources that would be adversely 
affected by the loss of the College. 

-The College budget must be reviewed and approved by the county annually 
to assure proper tax increases. 

• -The sponsorship agreement should be limited to an initial five year union, 
with the right of renewal by mutual consent'. 

the Williamsport City Council then decided to back the county sponsorship 
plan with a unanimous vote of approval. Dr. Robert L. Breuder, College presi- 
dent, spoke to the council and made the following points: 

-The county sponsorship plan is an interim undertaking of three to five years 
until the state hopefully takes over. 

-There is no alternative plan to county sponsorship and without it the College 

Avco employees part of first 
microcomputer lab for industries 



may have to close its doors. 

-Lower tax payments should be in order for most county residents resulting 
from county sponsorship. 

The West Branch Manufacturers' Association then announced its backing of 
the plan, citing the College's excellent reputation and contribution made to areas 
manufacturing community. 

A new wrinkle was added to the problem when the East Lycoming School 
District voted against the College's agreement to terminate the present sponsorship 
system. The directors of the district felt thai they would not benefit from the ter- 
mination and claimed that their real estate tax rate would jump significantly for 
about the same service. 

During this time, Dr. Breuder has continued to ask the students, faculty, and 
staff of the College to make their feelings known to the media and the county com- 
missioners concerning the issue. 

Dr. Breuder said, "As president, I'm encouraging not only our students but 
our faculty and staff to write letters and make telephone- calls or in any way 
necessary express their feehng regarding sponsorship. 1 think in the final analysis it 
(sponsorship) will be determined by what kind of reaction these three people (the 
commissioners) get from the public." 



Twenty employees of the Avco- 
Lycoming__Williamsport Division of Av- 
co Corporation, including two vice 
presidents, were enrolled in a computer 
training course at the College from 1 to 
4 p.m. Thursday. The Avco employees 
are the first "students" from the 
business sector to take a course in the 
College's new training lab in the 
Lifelong Education Center. 

"Introduction to Microcomputers" 
were taken by persons in Avco's person- 
nel, purchasing, accounting, production 
control, sales, engineering, service, and 
manufacturing engineering departments. 
The course, taught by William T. 
Ward, software/device specialist at the 
College, provided an introduction to the 
keyboard and basic ftinctions of the 
microcomputer. 

Avco has a number of microcom- 
puters in place at the plant, but since 
they are not in a central location, it is 
difficult to provide in-plant training. 
Instead, the training took place in 
Room A210 in the center. There are 20 
microcomputers available in that lab 
and 20 more in an adjacent room. The 
course represented the first in a propos- 
ed series designed to give Avco 



DECEMBER GRADUATES 

The deadline to tile a PETITION TO GRADUATE is THIS THURSDAY ^ 
Until then, the fee is $5 to cover the cost ot printing the diploma. After 
that date, the fee is $10 for late handling - and the diploma will be 
delivered late. Go to Records Office, Academic Center, to file petition. 



employees a working knowledge of the 
microcomputer. 

William Witmer, superintendent of 
statistical analysis at Avco, who make 
arrangements with the College for the 
course, was on hand to observe the 
course. 

Grant L. Martin, coordinator of 
specialized technical education pro- 
grams at the College, noted that it is ap- 
propriate that Avco employees be the 
first to take a course in the lab since 
their company donated $200,000 to the 
College for the Stage II of its capital 
development program, which included 
the construction of the center. 

Martin also noted that the College 
officials anticipate providing similiar 
courses for other businesses and in- 
dustries as more and more microcom- 
puters are placed in the worksite. 
The coordinator stated that the College 
is also developing microcomputer in- 
stuction courses for other businesses 
and industries, including: Frito-Lay, 
Muncy; Bro Dart, Williamsport; the 
Pennsylvania Department of Transpora- 
tion. District 3, Montoursville; GTE 
Slyvania, Reach Road,Williamsport; 
James V. Brown Library, Williamsport; 
and Cabinet Industries, Danville. 




AT THE COMPUTERS... See accompanying story 

FREE! 

I Buy any Size Original Round Pizza at 
regular price and get the identical pizza 
free with this coupon ! 
Take Out Only / Order Usually Ready in 10 Minutes 



WACC students additloiial 10% savings 

wilb ID on ail regular menu prices 

Wilb This Ad Only! 



LITTLE CAESARS 
GIANT PLAZA, GOLDEN STRIP 

327-8600 

MUST PRESENT COUPON 

WITH PURCHASE 

Offer valid thru Oct. 29 

Not valid wilh any other coupon 




C 1983 Little Cacsai Enterprises, Inc 



valuable coupon 



4DSPOTLIGHTaMoiiday, Ocl. I, 1914 



••THE NATURAL RESOURCES CENTER^^ 



Agribusiness 

Dairy Herd Managemenl 

FloricDllure 

Forestry Technology 

Nursery Managemenl 

(Landscape Technology) 

Service and Operation 

of Heavy Construction 

Equipment 

Wood Products Technology 

Outdoor Power Equipment 




Nestled at the base of the mountain, the Center is a picture-perfect place for learning about our natural resources. 





Pebbles D. Drum, of Williamsport., and Christina M. Brosius of Herndon, 
both florticulture slodenls spray (he freshly picked stems of the roses. 



Sign ODi in front of the campus 
that welcomes you. 





NO, ITS NOT THE GHOSTBUSTERS...Its Mar- 
sha L. Hetzendorf, of Turbotville and Laurie A. Monro, 
of Canton, spraying pesticides in the greenhouse. 



The land on which the Center is located was formerly used as an ammunition 
factory and a storage site during Worid War H. 



SPOTLIGHTDMondiy, Oct. 1, I»g4n3 





From left to right: Dale M. Anthonson, of Portage; Timothy M. 
Dolliver, of Canandaigna, N.Y.; and Brian K. Perry, of Franklin 
work on overhanling an engine. 



Dennis L. Masorti, a wood products technology student of Castanea, is 
working up in the rafters of the saw mill. 




Newly automated sawmill. Wood products technology students from left to 
right: Matthew D. Carey, of Williamsport; R. Scott Irons, of Franklin; Gregory 
S. Welshans, of Jersey Shore and Randall L. Holdren, of Loganlon. 



A peek inside the small engine shop. This shop has been used in 
the past by secondary students. This year there are two post secondary 
students from the outdoor power equipment program also using the 
shop. 




Construction of the Center, which 
encompasses over liO acres, was com- 
pleted in February 1972. The building 
was initially named in honor of former 
Congressman Herman T. Schneebeli. 



SPOTLIGHT Photos 

By Richard E. Kopp Jr. 

and Gisela D. Grassley 

Both of The SPOTLIGHT Staff 



6dSPOTUGHTDMoii<I«j, OcI. 1, 1»84 



DOWN 



ACROSS 
1 Beer 

tngredient 
5 Queen ol 

fairies 
8 Potato 

colloq 

12 Century plant 

13 Anger 

14 Sleeveless 
cloak 

15 For fear 
tfiat 

16 Series of 
games 

17 Metal 

18 Wfiips 
20 Brambly 
22 Chemical 

suffix 
?3 Vast age 
24 Sabers 
27 Recommence 

31 Hawaiian 
wreatfi 

32 Make lace 

33 Stiouled 
37 Montana's 

capital 

40 Organ of 
fieartng 

41 Employ 

42 Layers 

45 Feel indig- 
nant at 

49 Baker's 
producis 

50 Cusfiion 

52 Woody plant 

53 Great Lake 

54 Cloth 

55 Actual being 

56 Care for 

57 Expire 

58 Soaks 



1 Shaded walk 

2 Name tor 
Alhena 

3 Defeat 

4 Dog s chain 

5 Unmarried 
ladies 

6 Exist 

7 Improve 

8 Descendants 

9 Young 
salmon 

10 Preposition 

1 1 Negate 
19 Goal 

21 Garden tool 

24 Crafty 

25 Tiny 

26 Lubricate 

28 Southwest- 
ern Indian 

29 Male 

30 Greek letter 

34 Rented 

35 Dine 



[S I 


3 uHa i oHo N air 


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\£ 3 


H iBa * dllS 3 Id 


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36 Arranged in 
folds 

37 Leap over 

38 Compass 
point 

39 fi^an's name 
42 Barracuda 



43 Weary 

44 Check 

46 Gaelic 

47 Bird's home 

48 Golf mounds 
51 Moham- 
medan name 




PBL fundraiser today to cut trip cost 



Today at 1 1 a.m. Phi Beta Lambda 
(PBL) is holding an executive fund- 
raising meeting in Room 3 of the 
Academic Center. 

The chairperson of the committee 
is Judy L. Brokaw, a computer science 
student from Canton. 

The purpose of the fund-raising is 
to help cut expenses for those students 
attending The Eastern Regional Leader- 



ship Conference in Stanford, Conn, on 
Oct. 26, 27, and 28 

The fund raising products are from 
the Shuler Co. of Hanover. 



Nevada is listed as the leading state with 
the highest consumption of alcohol in 
the United States. 



BENSON 



Offl minL ^ 
/BnMJnarket 



Corner of 3rd and Mcynord Sts. 



Always Open: 
All Night 
Sundays 
and Holidays 




students. 

why fuss? 

Stop by 




BLUE STEEL... Makin' Ibe music 

250 hear Blue Steel at dance 

By Donna M. Barnelt, SPOTLIGHT managing editor 

Over 250 people attended the Student Government Association (SGA) spon- 
sored dance last Wednesday night in the Susquehanna Room. The featured band, 
Blue Steel, played, including several hits, from 8 to 11 p.m. 

"We like to play the slightly older 
stuff," Cletus Waldman, the band's business management student at the 
drummer said. "We like the heavy College. 

metal sounds and the older dance songs Waldman also noted that both Lee 

- like 'Cocaine' and 'Born to Be Wild', and Tyler received their musical training 

We also like songs from the early through high school; the other members 

Beatles to Queen." of the band were either self-taught or 

The group is comprised of five had private lessons, 
members - Jeff Hunter of Mon- Hunter was the one who came up 

toursville, lead vocals; Tom Bruder, of with the group's name. "It was named 
Montoursville and Ron Lee, of for the metal in guns - heavy metal 
Williamsport, guitars; Tim Tyler, of sounds," Waldman said. 
Montoursville, bass, and Waldman, of Blue Steel was also involved in the 

jersey Shore. 1983 WSQV/Miller High Life "Rock to 

Together five years Riches" contest. The band submitted 

The band has been together for two two songs - both of which were written 
years, but this particular line-up has on- by Bruder; "Rock and Roll Dreamers" 
ly been together for three months, and "Push Don't Shove". They placed 
Waldman said. He added that there are within the Top 4 and their songs were 
only three original members. Tyler, placed on a mini-album which was 
Blue Steel's newest member, is also a released to local music stores. 

How far can we go? 
By ballot, the public voted among 
the Top 4 bands. Blue Steel came in se- 
cond. 

When asked what the group's goal 
was, Waldman said,"We-'d really like to 
record a demo (demonstration) tape, 
and take it from there ~ to see how far 
the band can go. We're still developing 
our own style." 

Waldman also noted that they play 
mostly in the Williamsport area. 
"We've played in Mansfield and 
Bowman Field," Bruder added. 

As the group packed up their 
$20,000 worth of equipment, Waldman 
commented: "We're really thankful to 
play here (at the College). There are so 
few things for kids under 21 to do here 
in Williamsport, and 1 enjoy entertain- 
ing them. 




LOW TURNOUT'for Sleranko: tom- 
menling on Ted Steranko's (above) 
performance at the College last Thurs- Library DOStS hOUrS 
day, Steven D. Metzker, business 
management student from 
Williamsport and Student Government 
Association (SGA) president, cited a 
"low tnrnoul" and added, "His 
preliminary shows earlier in the day 
were well attended but only about 40 
people showed up at his main perfor- 
mance in the Academic Center 
Auditorium on Thursday evening." 
ISPOTUGHT pholol 



The library is now open on Sun- 
days from 2 p.m. to 9 p.m. according to 
Mrs. Kate D. Hickey, librarian. 

Regular hours are still as follows: 
Monday through Thursday from 8 a.m. 
to 9 p.m. and Fridays from 8 a.m. to 
4:30 p.m. The library will be closed on 
Saturdays. 



Sports 



Schedule 

Intramural Sports 

Flag Football 

Monday: 309 Rebels vs. Bums 
Oosers bracket), 5 p.m. 

Tuesday: Scumbuzzards vs. La 
Busch Boys (winners bracket)., 5 p.m. 

Wednesday: Headbangers vs. 
Winner of Rebels and Bums Oosers 
bracket), 5 p.m. 6 p.m. game to be an- 
nounced. 

Intercollegiate Sports 

Women's Cross Country 

Tuesday: At Lycoming College, 4 p.m. 
Men's Cross Country 

Tuesday: At Lycoming College, 4 p.m. 
Saturday: Delaware County Communi- 
ty College (CC) and Luzerne County 
CC at home, 12 p.m. 
Golf 
Friday: Northampton County CC and 
Luzerne County CC at Luzerne County 
CC, 2 p.m. 

Intramural flag 
football continues 

The flags are still being pulled for 
the second straight week in the flag foot- 
ball tournament, according to Glen L 
Korobov, College evening activities 
assistant. 

Results of games played thus far 
are listed in the following order: in first 
round of play. Mean Moms-38, 
Headbangers-0; Young Invaders-20, 
The Swarm-0; La Busch Boys-1, Colts-0 
(forfeit); and the Scumbuzzards-20, and 
Old Mil-I4. 

Second round action: Mean 
Moms-64, 309 Rebels-8; Young 
Invaders-32, Bums-30; and 
Scumbuzzards-28, Home Growns-6. 

First game of the losers' bracket: 
Headbangers-28 and The Swarm-24. 



Give Blood- 
Save A Life 

SPOTLIGHT service message 




SPOTUGHTDMondiy, Ocl. I, HMD? 




The Sidelines 



' Sports Cammentary 

By Rodney D. HUI 

SPOTLIGHT Sports Editor 



iMv/OiAMnyMM/*/! nt i wmi aaiHwAKuteinuM <NN./<miw<i 



Wayne M. Paffitt, anto body student 
from PottsTille, in recent run. See 
story, page 1. /SPOTLIGHT pholo by 
Kathy Foreman! 

Women to run 
cross country 

The College will have a women's 
cross country team in addition to the 
men's this year, according to Phillip D. 
Landers, associate professor of business 
administration and the College's cross 
country coach. 

The first dual meet will be tomor- 
row, against Lycoming College, said 
Landers. 

The members of the team include: 
Jennifer 0. Kuyper, a retail manage- 
ment student from Troy; Sandra L. 
Langis, a dietetic technician student 
from Elysburg; Connie L. Klees, an 
advertising art student from 
Williamsport; Stephanie M. McPeak, a 
general studies student from Centralia; 
Kori M. Jones, a dietetic technician stu- 
dent from Pine Grove; Donna L. 
Erlston, a general studies student from 
Danville and Darla J. Beahm, an ac- 
counting student from Mill Hall. 



Bowling results^ 



Team standings 

Team Wins Losses 

1. WE Three 3 

2. The Outlaws 2 I 

3. Dew Crew 2 I 

4. #5 2 1 

5. WACC Five-0 I 2 

6. Scratch 1 2 

7. Pin Busters 1 2 

8. #8 3 



Top "5" Averages 

Mark E. Reamsnyder, 214 

Rudy E. Long, 182 

Myles S. Murray, 178 

Shawn D. Burkhart, 171 

Barry A. Boney, 170 

Men's High Series 

Mark E. Reamsnyder, 626 

Myles S. Murray, 571 

Rudy E. Long, 518 



I would nornially have forecasted a 
football season by now, but because of 
some injuries and trades, 1 have elected 
to give the season a few weeks to 
mature, before sticking my fool in my 
mouth. 

The first division will be the 
Western Division of the American Foot- 
'ball Conference (AFC). My choice will 
have to be the Los Angeles Raiders. 1 
was convinced after last, year's Super 
Bowl that the Raiders are for real. As 
far as the runner-up team, 1 see the field 
wide open, but 1 do have my doubts 
with the Denver Broncos. The reason 
for my doubts is because of the fact, last 
year the highly-touted Bronco quarter- 
back, John Elway, finished next to the 
last position of all quarterbacks, anc^ 
what did the Broncos do? They picked 
up Scott Brunner, the quarterback who 
finished in the last spot while he was 
with the New York Giants. 

The AFC East will be dominated 
by Dan Marino and the Miami 
Dolphins, with the New York Jets a dis- 
tant second, followed by the New 
England Patriots, Buffalo Bills and the 
Indianapolis Colts will pick up the rear. 

The AFC Central Division is going 
to be tough to pick, because after three 

Intramurals slated 

Intramural basketball and 
volleyball leagues are being formed, ac- 
cording to Mrs. JoAnn R. Fremiotti, 
coordinator of intramural athletics and 
College activities. 

Anyone interested should leave 
their name at the Recreation Center, in 
the Lifelong Education Center. The 
deadline is Oct. 10, said Mrs. Fremiotti. 

Responses are still being accepted 
for Intramural soccer, added Mrs. 
Fremiotti. 

NEED TYPING DONE? 

Students: Need someone to type 
your papers, reports? Call me at Mon- 
loursville RD, S46-873S, after S p.m. 
Reasonable rates, [advt] 



Women's High Series 

Denise M. King, 407 
Denise M. McNeil, 347 
Karen M. Metarko, 329 

Team High Series 

The Outlaws, 1870 
Dew Crew, 1842 
Pin Busters, 1771 



weeks the Piusburg Steclers was the on- 
ly team that had won a game, and they 
certainly are hurting. I will pick the 
Steelers to win the division though. If 
the Steelers are pushed at all, it vrill 
come from the Cleveland Browns, the 
Cincinnati Bengals and the Houston 
Oilers will round out the field. 

The National Football Conference 
(NFC) seems to be more competitive 
this year. The San Francisco Forty- 
Niners are looking in top form, and 
they should be in the thick of things 
right to the end. 1 think the Los 
Angeles Rams will be a sure second, the 
Atlanta Falcons will finish third and the 
New Orleans Saints can be a surprise at 
the end of the season. 

I'm still a little leary of the teams 
in the NFC Eastern Division. 1 will take 
the Dallas Cowboys even though they 
do have a new signal caller. The 
Cowboys have a rich heritage of playing 
successful football, and probably the 
best management and coaching in foot- 
ball. The St. Louis Cardinals will be se- 
cond to Dallas. The New York Giants 
will be in the third spot, the Washington 
Redskins will fall back to number four 
and th^ Philadelphia Eagles are a cinch 
for the bottom spot. 

Last but not least, the once "black 
and blue division," which later became 
the "powder puff division". The NFC 
Central Division will get its respectabili- 
ty back this year. I'm going with my 
team as usual, the Green Bay Packers. 
I believe they will do better than what 
they have shown so far. The Detriot 
Lions will play a tight second, the 
Chicago Bears will fall off to a third 
place, the Minnesota Vikings are 
without the services of long-time coach 
Bud Grant, which will be their biggest 
setback, and the Tampa Bay Buccaneers 
will finish last. 

Foes in the Super Bowl will be the 
Raiders and the Forty-Niners. The end 
result will be the Raiders for the second 
consecutive year. 



Women's High Single 

Denise M. King, 171 

Denise M. McNeil, 126 

Karen M. Metarko, 112 

Men's High Single 

Myles S. Murray, 226 

Mark E. Reamsnyder, 223 

Rudy E. Long, 187 



Team High Single 

Outlaws, 672 
Dew Crew, 658 

Pin Busters, 638 




SaSPOTllGHTDMondiy. Ocl. I, 1984 



Another meeting 

set to organize 

Outing Club 

Another organizational 
meeting for the Outing Club has 
been set for 4 p.m. this Wednes- 
day in the student lounge of the 
Academic Center in an attempt to 
reactivate the currently "inactive" 
club. 

According to Steven T. 
McDonald, media technician and 
club adviser, about six students 
have approached him toncerning 
their interest in outdoor events, 
but added there has been no 
strong indications of "active" 
participation. 

The advLser stressed that he 
wanted the group to be student- 
run. He added that topics to be 
discussed at the meeting will be 
planning events for the rest of the 
semester. 

Anyone who is interested in 
joining the club, but cannot attend 
the meeting, may contact 
McDonald at Ext. 219. 



Frisbee show 
next Tuesday 
to feature 
Canadian champs 

The Good Times Professional Disc 
Show, featuring Ken Weslerfield and 
Brian McElwain, will be held at the Col- 
lege next Tuesday from 7 to 9 p.m. in 
the Bardo Gymnasium. 

Admission is free to the show, 
which includes frisbee throwing with 
musical accompaniment, a demonstra- 
tion, and a competition involving au- 
dience participation. 

Preliminary demonstrations from 
the Disc Show will take place from 10 to 
10:30 a.m. that day at the Natural 
Resources Center, from noon to 12:30 
p.m. on the Academic Center lawn, and 
at the North Campus from 2:45 to 3:15 
p.m. 

Westerfield, the winner of the 
1982-83 Canadian frisbee title, and 
holder of the world distance record in 
frisbee tossing (552 feet), has been 
throwing frisbees for 15 years. McEl- 
wain finished second in the worid 
freestyle championships. 



BULLETIN BOARD 

For Ihe week of Monday, Oct. I through Friday, Oct. 5 
SPORTS 
Coif... against Northhampton Community College and Luzume County Communi- 
ty College, 2 p.m., this Friday, away. 

MEETINGS 
Alpha Omega Fellowship... 7 to 10 p.m., tomorrow. Room 227, Academic Center. 
Phi Beta Lambda... i.lS p.m., tomorrow, Room 329, Academic Center. 

SALE 
Hamburger and hot dog sale... 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. this Wednesday, Oct. 3, Natural 
Resources Center, sponsored by the Horticulture Technicians Club. 



ID processing continues this week 



From approximately more than 
4,000 students at the College, 2,165 
have gone through Ihe ID processing 
system since its inception at the beginn- 
ing of the Fall semester. 

According to Mrs. JoAnn R. 
Fremiotti, coordinator of intramural 
athletics and College activities, ID pro- 
cessing will continue thii, week from 10 
a.m. to noon, today through Friday 
and 4:30 to 7:30 p.m. from Monday to 
Thursday. 

Processing will take place in the 
Recreation Center Office, Room A137 
of the Lifelong Education Center. New 
students or anyone without an ID card 



Cillo's 

College Corner 

We'll prepare your 
favorite Subs and Burgers 
ttie way you like them! 



Play LUCKY NUtlflBERS 

and 

win a lialf sub 

plus medium drink 

Four Winners 
Every Weelc 



Cillo's Colkfie Cornfr 
1100 W. Third SI.. Williainiporl 
(Neil lo Acadtinic Center) 
Phone Ahead: lumi 
Hours: 7:30 a.m. lo 6:00 p.m. 
Monday Ihrounh Friday 



may bring their schedules for verifica- 
tion purposes whereas returning 
students may bring their previously 
validated ID cards. 

"There will be no more leniency 
shown to those without currently 
validated IDs. They should not expect 
to pay reduced admission prices at the 
Monday night movies or anticipate get- 
ting into rollerskating parties at Skating 
Plus for free," said Mrs. Fremiotti. 

She added that students cannot 
enter the gymnasium in the Bardo Gym 
after 4 p.m. without presenting a cur- 
rently validated College ID. "Students 
who want emergency loans from the 
Financial Aid Office for the weekend 
should not turn up at my door on Fri- 
day afternoon wanting ID validation 
which is required for those loans." 

The fee for replacement of a lost ID 
is $10 




JUST LISTENIN' - More than 200 attended last Wednesday's dance with Blue 
Steel providing the music. See story, page 6. /SPOTLIGHT photo by Richard E. 
Kopp Jr. I 




FACULTY MEMBERS JOIN forces during last Wednesday's organizational 
meeting of the Women's Forum. The women discussed the need for more student 
membership, proposed changes in the annually-held Women's Week, and the 
possible merger with Sigma Pi Omega, a student service sorority. Pictured, from 
left to right, are: Mrs. Veronica M. Muzic, English professor, interim division 
director of Integrated Studies and club co-adviser; Miss Janie Swartz, English in- 
structor; Miss Kathryn A. Ferrence, career development specialist and club co- 
adviser, and Mrs. Doreen W. Shope, assistant professor of business administra- 
tion, and Sigma Pi Omega adviser. fSPOTLIGHT photo by Gisela D. Grassley.J 




Dancing at 
** Skating Plus •• 

$2.00 

free admission with WACC ID 
free Pepsi & piece of pizza 

^ " ^ /.^n^ V'"a Bella & William St. 

Oct. 3,1984 322-6123 



Spotlight 



Moaday, Ocl. 8. 1984 • Vol. 20. No. 7 • 8 Pages 
Williamsporl Area Communily College • Williamsporl, Pa. 17701 



,/, y<m'//M'/jixmawmim'/. 




PBL building float for parade; 
group to hold meeting tomorrow 



Staff. 



NEWLY ELECTED OFFICERS of the Alpha Omega FeUowship are (from 
left to right): Paul A. Evan, a plumbing and heating student from Schwenksville, 
president; Javette 0. Thumma, a dental hygiene student from Carlisle, vice presi- 
dent and Kristina L. Brumbaugh, a dairy herd management student from Ship- 
pensburg, secretary and treasurer. ISPOTLIGHT photo by Richard E. Kopp Jr.j 

Women's Week' plans begun; 
proposed changes discussed 

By Karen M. Metarko co-adviser of the Women's Forum 

Of The SPOTLIGHT Staff (sponsors of the event), the tentative 

Formal planning sessions for the theme for the culmination of activities is 
annual "Women's Week" at the Col- "Women in the Arts", 
lege will begin this week with the first Changes discussed 

session at noon Wednesday, in Room Miss Ferrence and Mrs. Veronica 

B107, of the Lifelong Education Center. M. Muzic, professor of English and in- 
According to Miss Kathryn A. Fer- terim director of the Integrated Studies 
rence, career development specialist and Division, held a recent meeting of the 
Women's Forum and discussed propos- 
ed changes for "Women's Week". Mrs. 
Muzic is a co-adviser of the Women's 
Forum. 

Proposed changes included 
shortening the length of the week's 
worth of activities, and changing the 
date of the event from March to April. 
It was detailed that other College 
events, such as the Phi Beta Lambda 
Annual Business Symposium and the 
College's Open House, occur within the 
women's events usual time, and forum 
members discussed changing the time in 
order to break up the different events. 
Sigma Pi Omega merger plans 
Miss Ferrence had further noted 
that Sigma Pi Omega, a student service 
sorority, had planned to merge with the 
forum in order to increase membership 
and sponsored activities. 

But according to the organization's 
adviser, Mrs. Doreen W. Shope, assis- 
tant professor, business admmistration, 
the group decided to retain their in- 
dependence, but may be working on 
other projects with the forum for women 
students, such as Miss Ferrence's pro- 
■ ■■ Please turn to Page 8 



Phi Beta Lambda (PBL) will hold a 
meeting tomorrow at 3:15 p.m. in 
Room 329, Academic Center and 
members are being encouraged to attend 
by PBL officers. 

Plans for this semester, detailed by 
Paul W. Goldfeder, assistant professor 
. of business administration and club ad- 
viser, include being involved in the 
Mummers' Day Parade on Saturday, 
Oct. 20 and fund raising activities. 

Judy L. Brokaw, a computer infor- 
mation systems student from Canton, is 
fund raising chairman. 

Some of the PBL members plan to 
attend the Eastern Regional Fall 
Leadership Conference in Scranton, 
later this month, Goldfeder added. 

Also, yearly dues for all members 
are due by this Friday and may be paid 



in Room 3 of the Academic Center, he 
said. 



Long record of wins 
The College's Phi Beta 
Lambda unit has a long record of 
earning awards for floats in the 
annual Mummers' Day parades 
in South WiUiamsport. 

According to SPOTLIGHT 
rdes, PBL floats have been prize 
winners for the past nine years. 
That includes eight first place 



In November, PBL will be staffing 
a Christmas tree at the Lycoming Mall, 
Muncy, for the Central Pennsylvania 
Lung and Health Services Association, 
as a club community service project. 



Student-run eatery opens; 
patrons give high reviews 



raises $2,111 
for United Way 
in one day 

The College staff raised over 
$2,000 in one day for the kick-off of the 
annual United Way fund drive, accor- 
ding to William C. Bradshaw, director 
of experiental learning and coordinator 
of the College's fund-raising program. 

The county-wide drive began last 
Tuesday by a meeting with Robert But- 
ters, chairman of the educational divi- 
sion of the Lycoming County United 
Way. 

Within the first day, the College 
raised over 25 percent of its goal of 
$8,000, Bradshaw noted. He added that 
last year the College raised $7,603, a 
$1,103 increase over the $6,500 goal. 

With about a 5 percent increase 
over last year's goal for this year, Brad- 
shaw stated he is optimistic that the Col- 
lege will not only reach the goal, but 
will exceed it. 



By Sandra R. Taylor 
Of the SPOTLIGHT staff 

The Le Jeune Chef Restaurant held 
its grand opening last Monday, Oct. 1. 
Students and faculty both dined in the 
new area, and were seated by a student 
"hostess" and attended to by student 
"waiters" and "waitresses". 

Le Jeune's first customer during 
the sneak preview, given on Sept. 27, 
was Mrs. Doreen W. Shope, assistant 
professor, business administration, 
stated, "The restaurant is a wonderful 
idea. It has excellent food, the at- 
mosphere is nice, and the price is ab- 
solutely unbeatable. I intend to be a 
regular patron of the restaurant. I 
would compare this restaurant to the 
finest restaurants in WiUiamsport." 



Gisela D. Grassley, a journalism 
student from Milton, said, "The food is 
great. It sure beats waiting in line and 
having to eat cold food." 

Restaurant course detailed 
The proposal for the restaurant 
course, known as Quality Foods Pro- 
duction Services, was initiated by Dr. 
William J. Martin, director of secon- 
dary vocational program, and Mrs. 
Ann R. Miglio, instructor for the food 
service and hospitality curriculum. 

I he restaurant is operated by eight 
post-secondary students and 10 secon- 
dary students, under the direction of 
Mrs. Judith M. Patschke, secondary 
vocational instructor, and Howard R. 
Mihan, post-secondary instructor. 

■■■ Ptease turn to Page 8 




STUDENTS WAIT OUTSIDE of the Learning Resources Center Thursday 
morning due to a fire alarm. According to Lawrence P. Smeak, director of securi- 
ty the alarm had malfunctioned. /SPOTLIGHT photo by LeRoy S. WhitmireJr.j 



iDSPOTUGHTDMoDdiy, Oct. I, IM4 



U.S. government must continue support 



►►►SPOTLIGHT commentary on space shuttle 



The government has to make effective decisions 
concerning the nation's space program, or the realiza- 
tion of the space shuttle will be lost. 

Shuttle's many advantages noted 

For instance, in agriculture, information from 
satellites launched by the shuttle craft could serve to in- 
crease food productivity, help alleviate world-wide food 
shortages, increase efficiency within the food industry 
and enhance the competition of U.S. agriculture. 

Communication satellites have made intercontinen- 
tal television possible, and are reducting transatlantic 
telephone calls. Reusable shuttes take new and improv- 
ed satellites into orbit. 

In our environment, satellites send weather infor- 
mation to earth, track atr pollution and identify and 
monitor air quality. Skylab photographs have identified 
large mineral deposits in many parts of the world, and 
satellites help conserve forest resources in remote 
areas by detecting fires, pest infestations and inven- 
tories of timberland. 

Technology In other Industrialized countries 
The Japanese government supports development and 
use of technology which has economic and industrial 
potential Low technology industries that are effective 
in international competition are not protected, and will 
eventually fade out. This happens to large and small 
enterprises. The Japanse government provides little 
funding of research and development, but attempts 
establishing an environment that is conducive to the in- 
dustry's commercial development of technology. 

The British government supports research and 

development with contributions in areas of defense, 

space, and nuclear energy. Their government makes 

key decisions on which technologies will be developed. 

The British government does apply itself in expan- 



ding the country's supply of basic scientific and 
technical manpower. 

The French government, which is strong and cen- 
tralized, supports civilian only incremental im- 
provements in mature industries. 

The French government, which is strong and cen- 
tralized, supports civilian technology, such as nuclear 
energy, computers and aircraft. The French govern- 
ment provides vast subsidies to competitively weak in- 
dusthes in ensuring a domestic supplier in every impor- 
tant industry. The French policy includes upgrading its 
technological base to support competitiveness. Also, 
the French stress participation by industry in human 
resource technological training. 

U.S. funds have depleted In research 

Our nation's expenditures for research and 
development declined to 2.2 percent in 1 978 from three 
percent in 1 964. The U.S. rate of increased productivity 
has dwindled to 2.1 percent average increase during 
1966-73 and finally to .8 percent during 1973-79. 

This alarming trend shows the necessity for inova- 
tion and improved technology in this country. 

For the U.S. to regain its industrial and marketing 
control, our government must take strong effective ac- 
tion in marketing space shuttle opportunities. 
Space shuttle plans through next year detailed 

The space agency plans for four shuttles to orbit 
through September 1985, making a total of 44 flights 
since the shuttle's creation. This averages to two 
payloads per flight. Thirty-one of these payloads will 
place communication satellites for 10 commercial 
customers. Also, the military will be using the shuttle 
craft extensively for defense purposes. Few flights will 
be devoted to development and commercialization of 
technological breakthroughs. 



Responsibility 
on students 

►^►■SPOTLIGHT commentary on lifter 

In recent years the College 
has seen many changes. These 
changes have been for the betterment 
and the beautification of this institution. 

D the fact remains that 

there is still a litter problem around the 

campus. This fact is evident by the 

cigarette butts and trash scattered 

around the grounds. 

I he College has honored its 
responsibility by placing ash trays and 
trash receptacles at convenient loca- 
tions around the campus. 

Now the responsibility rests 
upon the students. 

Is it too much to ask to place a 

cigarette butt in an ash tray or a candy 

wrapper in a trash can? 

I art of entering into college 
life is maturing, entering into 
adulthood, and taking on responsibility. 

It is up to each of us to take 

pride in our College and help keep it 

looking good. 



Letter to the Editor 

Student urges nixing of sports cut 

Dear Editor: 

When considering the future of the four remaining intercollegiate sports at 
the College - basketball, golf, cross country, and tennis - I hope that Dean 
Rodney G. Hurley will also consider the negative effect that a dicontinuation of 
these sports would have on our student body, future students, our College, and 
other institutions, whom in the past have given us our competition. 

I can only speak lor cross country, where there is not a shortage of par- 
ticipating athletes. Harry C. Specht, assistant professor of physical education, 
feels that athletic participation is good. 

I am sure that there are some students who came to the College with no in- 
tentions ol getting involved in an athletic program, but were attracted by the 
challenge, the competitiftn. the physical fitness, or simply for something to do in 
their spare time 

I have been running competitively for nearly five years. I graduated from 
high school in 1983, After looking into two-year institutions which offer my cur- 
riculum and intercollegiate cross country, I found out that there are only three in 
Pennsylvania. I'm sure that there have been students and will be students choos- 
ing to attend the College partially because of its athletic opportunities. There is 
no doubt that there will be students looking elsewhere for their education if these 
sports ate dropped. If they had been dropped last year, the chances are very 
great that I would not be attending the College now. 

Education, in my opinion, is growing - mentally, physically, and socially. An 
imbalance of any of these will not produce a fully-educated person. There is no 
doubt that athletics are as important as classwork and study, for athletics teach 
us how to compete fairly It also leaches us good sportsmanship while being able 
to socialize. These opportunities will not be fully appreciated or experienced, ex- 
cept through athletics. 

So please. Dean Hurley, be aware of the importance of what's left of our in- 
tercollegiate athletic program at the College. And also remember the College 
motto - "Opportunity with Excellence." Sports play a large role. 

Wayne M. Parfltf 
an auto body repair student from Pottsvllle 



Inmate's request 

Dear Editor: 

I am now incarcerated at the 
fedSl«l prison in Ashland, Kentucky, 
and I am seeking correspondence with 
anyone that would like to start a pen- 
pal relationship. 

Jimmy Wayne Reachard 

P.O. Box 888-96990-131 

Ashland, Kentucky 41101 

Letters 

Letters to the SPOTLIGHT readers 
may be delivered personally or sent to 
The SPOTLIGHT office, Room 7, 
Academic Center. Letters cannot be 
published until the signator's name is 
verified. 



TV movie's 
reality praised 

Review by Jennifer S. White 

A movie filled with 

courage, love. hope 

and truly worthy of a 
round of applause. 

The television movie "Heart 
Sounds", portrayed the true-to-life 
struggle for life after heart surgery. 

The stars, James Garner and 
Ivlary Tyler Moore, played their roles 
excellently, thanks to a well-written 
script by Norman Lear, 



We urge our readers to attend and participate in an open forum with 
two politicians, U.S. Senator Arlen Specter and State Rep. Roger 
Madigan, at 6:30 pm., this Friday. Oct 12. in the Academic Center 
auditorium. It was noted that the two will discuss items of interest to 
residents of Lycoming County, 



SPOTLIGHT 
Monday, Oct. 8, 1984 - Vol. 20, No. 7 

The SPOTLIGHT is published each Monday morning of the academic year ex- 
cept (Of College vacations, by iournalism and other interested students ol The 
Wiiliamsport Area Community College 

Office Room 7. Academic Center. 1005 W, Third St. Wiiliamsport Pa 
17701 Telephone (717) 326-3761. Extension 221. 

Opinions expressed are those ol the student newspaper or of those whose 
names accompany items Opinions do not rellect official opinion of the institution. 

The SPOTLIGHT is a member ol 
the Columbia Scholastic Press Association 

THE STAFF 

Oonna lyl. Barnett. Managing Editor: Karen M Metarko, EaUortal Page Editor Gisela 
13. Grassley. Photography Editor: lularkS Schwanl<e, Admlnislralrve Affairs Editor- 
James K Mornssey. Student Affairs Editor: Kathryn M. Gilbert, Advertising 
Manager; Rodney D Hill, Sports Editor: Richard E Kopp Jr., Natural Resources 
Management Campus Editor 

REPORTERS/STAFF ASSOCIATES 

Wanna F Brown, Melanle S Callahan, Kalhleen L Eiswert Roxanne A 
Goodier George I Hawk. Robert W Minier. Anne T Moratelli, Donald E Mumlord' 
f <? L^"''^'"'"'' ■'""''*' '- Swinehan, Sandra R Taylor, James E Treese Jen- 
niter S White, LeRoy S Whilmire Jr , Canda M Zinck 

Faculty adviser: Anthony N. Ciilo 



Production Staff This Issue 

James K Morrissey, production supervisor: Karen M. Metarko, videocomposl- 
lon and copy editor; Robert W Minier, Sandra L Musgrave, Jennifer S White and 
LeRoy S Whttmire Jr , production assistants 



SPOTLIGHTDMoadt;, Oct. «, IM4d3 



Whaddya' say...? | 

S [Technical problems prevented use of photos wilh this feature I '* 

Question: What do you think could be done to Improve the recrea- :■:• 
tional activities for you in the Wllliamsport area? 
Location: Main Campus 

I Text by Canda M. Zincl<, of The SPOTLIGHT Staff 

jiji Kelly Charles, computer science technology student from 

:| Unityville: "Have more dances with pop and country music, and have I 

:| more sports activities, like volleyball and swimming " S 

S Randall S, Powlus, advertising.art student from Mill Hall; "Decrease S 

li the cost of activities and have more free activities." ■:■ 

I Oebra A. Stlver,word processing student from Williamsport: "Put in 

S an amusement parl< with year-round activities, like an indoor ice skating 
S rink." 

SherrI L. Harbst. retail management student from Lewistown: 
% "Have more activities in Brandon Park. .like, concerts." :l 

Robert P. ZaborowskI Jr., electronics technology student from 
:* Selinsgrove: "Create a city football team," S 

College representatives to present 
'planning academy' at Texas convention 



Courtesy College Informalion Office 

Dr. Robert L. Breuder, College 
president; Dr. Rodney G. Hurley, dean 
of educational research, planning and 
evaluation, and Dr. Daniel J. Doyle, 
professor of history, will present a 
Strategic Long Range Planning 
Academy in San Antonio, Texas, this 
week in conjunction with the Associa- 
tion of Community College Trustees' 
15th Annual Convention which meets 
this Thursday next Monday. 

The presentation will be similiar to 
the one made by the three last year at 
the 14th annual convention in Phoenix, 
Ariz. 

The purpose of the academy is to 
teach others how to design, implement, 
and evaluate the long range planning 
process. As presented by the College 
administrators, it is designed expressly 
for trustees, chief executive officers and 
other management officials involved or 
interested in preparing and budgeting 
for the future through strategic long 
range planning. 

Developed its own model 

The College developed its own long 
range plan model beginning in 1982 to 
prepare for the Middle States Associa- 
tion Accreditation visit in the spring of 
this year. 

Documents in that plan included a 
North Campus Needs Assessment 
Study, the College Fact Book, Assess- 
ment Report, and the Long Range Plan. 
Middle States had praised the plan and 
noted that the College had approached 
the self-study and planning process in a 



very senous manner 

The College's plan has been 
granted creditibility by several sources. 
Not only was the College re-accredited 
until June 1994, its long range plan is 
being used as a planning model by at 
least four other colleges in the Middle 
States region. 

Planning is 'essential' 

"Long range planning is essential 
to community colleges," Dr. Breuder 
noted. "The community college needs a 
systematic approach to comprehending 
itself and its environment. 

"The present must be understood 
in all facets in order to forecast the 
future with any accuracy. Strategic 
Long Range Planning provides the 
mechanism for assessing the present and 
forecasting the future in the context of 
institutional knowledge, environmental 
awareness, participant involvement, and 
future-oriented leadership that results in 
action rather than reaction." 

More than 700 colleges nationwide 
will participate in the annual ACCT 
convention although the academy is 
limited to 150 participants. All ex- 
penses associated with the academy are 
paid by the academy. 



Tomorrow 

is the 
LAST DAY 
to register 
to VOTE! 



ACROSS 

1 Sword 

6 English 

streetcars 
1 1 Aflirm 
f2 Ceremony 
14 Booty 
f5 Wooden box 

17 French article 

18 Hail! 

19 Open space 
in forest 

20 Inlet 

21 Symbol tor 
tellurium 

22 Beast 

23 Storage 
compart- 
ments 

24 Encompass 

26 Doctrine 

27 Stockings 

28 Steep, 
rugged rock 

29 Discharges 
of gun 

.31 Frocks 

34 Defeat 

35 Brag 

36 Sun god 

37 Shoshonean 
Indian 

38 Ties 

39 Large bird 

40 Pronoun 

41 Jury list 

42 Send forth 

43 Gratify 
45 Motor 

47 Surfeits 

48 Shoulder 
wrap 

DOWN 

1 One negli- 
gent of 
cleanliness 



2 Century 
plant 

3 Wager 

4 For example: 
abbr 

5 Hermit 

6 Barter 

7 Ceremony 

8 Devoured 

9 Between 
lambda 
and nu 

10 Salty 

1 1 Winged 
13 Smallest 

number 
16 Evaluate 

19 Twelve dozen 

20 Tolls 

22 Blemishes 

23 Animal 

25 Selected 

26 Lock olhair 

28 Babies beds 

29 Decline 

30 Hostelnes 



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31 Accom- 
plished 

32 Valuable fur 

33 Fry quickly 
in tat 

35 Climbing 

plants 
38 Foundation 



39 Man s name 

41 Man's 
nickname 

42 The sell 

44 Babylonian 

deity 
46 Symbol lor 

niton 



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Ben Franklin Partnership Consortium 
regional meeting here this Wednesday 



Courtesy of College 
On Wednesday, the College is 
hosting a regional meeting of the Ben 
Franklin Partnership Consortium. 

The group is based at Lehigh 
University. The Ben Franklin Partner- 
ship was set up by the state to channel 
monies into teaching education leaders 
to foster small businesses and facilitate 
the development of high technology. 

The consortium is particularly in- 
terested in the CADD/CAM system the 
College now has. (CADD is computer- 
aided design and CAM is computer- 
aided manufacturing/machining. The 
CADAM system is highly-sophistocated 
as well as state-of-the-art and 
demonstrates the College's commitment 



Information Office 

to providing education in the high 

technologies. 

The College will provide the ap- 
proximately 75 industry and education 
leaders attending the session with a tour 
and demonstration of the CADAM 
labs. 

Dr. Robert L. Breuder, College 
president, will welcome the leaders who 
are coming from the eastern sector of 
the state. The College will also provide 
luncheon for the group in the new food 
service program restaurant, housed in 
the Lifelong Education Center. 



1921. 



Whitney Moore Young was born iti 




Church of the Annunciation 

410 Walnut Street 

(Corner of West Fourth and Walnut Sts.) 

Telephone: 323-9456 

Msgr. William J. Fleming, V.F., Pastor 

Fallier Ricliard J. Locli, Assl. 

Fattier Bert S. Kozen, Assl. 

Father Josepii D. Gilbert, in residence 

7 am the Good Shepherd. I know Mine and Mine know Me. . . for these I will ^i ve A// /(/p. " ~ Jolin 1 0; 1 4- 1 5 



Schedule of Services 
weekend masses: 

Saturday Evening - 4 P.M. and 5:30 P.M. 

Sunday Morning - 7:30, 9:00, 10:15, and 11:30 A.M. 

Sunday Afternoon - 5:00 P.M. 
DAILY MASSES: 

7:00 and 8:00 A.M. and 12:10 P.M. (except Saturday) 
SACRAMENT OF CONFESSION: Saturday, 4:45 to 5:30 P.M. 
or by appointment. 



4DSPOTLlGHTaMoDdiy. Ocl. «, 1984 

SGA assists in contribution 
of 56 first aid kits for College 



In an effort to "promote safety 
standards at the College", the Student 
Government Association (SGA) and the 
Secondary Vocational Programs Divi- 
sion have contributed $2,286 for 56 first 



Sociology instructor 
attends recent conference 

Richard Sahn, instructor of 
sociology and psychology, attended this 
year's Pennsylvania Sociological Society 
Annual Conference, which was held at 
the Indiana University of Pennsylvania, 
Sept. 28 through 30. 

Sahn staled thai the main focus of 
the conference was the presentations 
made by fellow sociologists concerning 
current research projects in their field. 

He noted that workshops were also 
held, with many on the conference's 
theme of problems facing the 
unemployed In the state. 

Expense of the trip was paid from a 
portion of College funds for faculty 
travel expenses. 

College position 
openings listed 

A listing of job openings at the 
College have been made available 
through information at the personnel 
office. 

Available positions for internal 
(those that already work at the College) 
and external in the faculty category in- 
clude: aviation instructor, with salary 
congruent to credentials submitted in 
accordance with the College's Faculty 
Salary System, to start Jan. 2, 1985, 
and part-time and substitute instructors 
in electrical, carpentry and plumbing, to 
be called on as needed, with the part- 
time position paying $330 per credit and 
a substitute position allowance of $40 
per diem or $8 per hour up to a max- 
imum of $40 per day. 

Positions available in the ad- 
ministrative, professional and technical 
category include director of the physical 
plant, dean of student services, coor- 
dinator of staff and program develop- 
ment and division director of integrated 
studies. 

It was noted that recommendations 
have been made to fill the positions of 
secretaries to the division director of in- 
tegrated studies, with a proposed annual 
salary of $9,697 and the dean of 
employee and public relations, with the 
proposed salary of $10,27-3. The recom- 
mendations would be final due to the 
College president having to approve 
them, personnel staff stated. 

The College also has an opening in 
the services department for a grounds- 
keeper, at $9,709 annually. 

More information is available at 
the personnel office, second floor. 
Lifelong Education Center, or by calling 
Ext. 314. 



aid kits which have been distributed 
throughout the College this semester. 

According to Mrs. Janet R. 
Querimit, College nurse, the 56 kits 
each contain iodine swabs, eye dress- 
ings, bandages, tourniquets, antiseptic 
aerosol, scissors, compresses, and an 
assortment of surgical supplies. This, 
she said, "takes them beyond the usual 
capabilities of an average first aid kit." 

"If anybody has an accident in one 
of the industrial instruction sectors of 
the College," Mrs. Querimit explained. 
"There are enough supplies contained 
in a kit for me to help the victim on the 
spot." 



College Night to be held 
on Main Campus next Monday 

The College will present College Night from 7 to 9 p.m. next Monday for 
students needing information about transferring to another college. 

There will be 88 colleges represented in the program and about 1,200 students 
from Lycoming County are expected to attend, it was noted. 

A daytime program will also be presented, with 28 colleges being re;-esented. 

Students who wish more information may contact Lawrence W. I lery Jr., 
director of counseling, career development and placement at Ext. 246 or in Room 
157, Learning Resources Center (LRC). 



You have to register to vote to 
have your say in November. Tomorrow 
is the last day to register. 



$254XXX). 



Tkwo hundred and fifty-four 
thousand dollars. That's the ex- 
tra lifetime income you can earn 
with a bachelors degree instead of a 
two or three year program, accord- 
ing to the U.S. Census Bureau. It 
pays to continue your education at 
Spring Garden College. Transfer 
students are our top priority. 

Worry-Free Transfer Credit 

Our transfer policy gives you the 
maximum credits toward your 
bachelors degree. With your A.S. in 
a related major, you are an auto- 
matic junior and all of your credit 
will apply to your degree. For non- 
degree transfers or those in an un- 
related major, you can receive cred- 
it on a course-by-course basis. 

First-Rate Career Education 

Spring Garden offers bachelors de- 
grees in business and accounting; 
computers; electronics, manufac- 
turing or mechanical engineering 
technology; interior design; archi- 



tecture; construction and civil en- 
gineering technology; technical 
writing or chemical, life and health 
sciences. A convenient location 
and day or evening programs make 
transferring a breeze. 
Don't sell yourself short Transfer 
to Spring Garden College and let us 
expand your potential and your 
wallet! 

Ottr Admiamtona Representative 
will visit your txunpua on Monday, 
October IS. 

For a transfer credit evaluation — 
call today! 242-3700 or complete 
and mail coupon to: 

SPRING GARDEN COLLEGE 
ADMISSIONS OFFICE 
102 EAST MERMAID LANE 
PHILADELPHIA, PA 19118 



jB 



SPRING 

GARDEN 

COLLEGE 



PLEASE SEND; CATALOGUE APPLIC 

OTHER (PLEASE SPECIFY) 
NAME 

STREET , 
CITY 

HIGH SCHOOL 
INTERESTED IN (MAJOR) 
EXPECTED DATE OF ENTRY. FALL 


ATION . 




FINAN 


CIAL AID INFO 








PHONE 


STATE 


COLL 




ZIP CODE 


EGE 




,. SPRING. 




, YEAR 



SPOTLIGHTDMondn, Ocl. 8, 1984d5 



Security chief discusses 
parking for handicapped 

Parking is available at the College 
for handicapped students, according to 
Lawrence P. Smeak, supervisor of 
security. 

Students are evaluated on where 
their classes are located at the College, 
he said. Each student's handicap is 
taken into consideration, Smeak added. 

Students with wheel chairs have 
first priority, he noted. Ambulatory 
students are interviewed by security per- 
sonnel to consider if the student can 
walk the distance to the classrooms. 

There are no specific parking 
spaces assiped to students and 24-hour 
parking is available in any designated 
area, Smeak said. 

Special parking stickers are given to 
the students who are eligible to park in 
the handicapped parking spaces. There 
are 11 parking spaces designated in 
various areas around the campus, 
Smeak said. 

Persons driving handicapped 
students to school and leaving them at 
the door are not eligible to park in the 
handicapped zones, the chief noted. 

A $25 fine is issued to anyone 
parking in a handicapped parking space 
when not authorized to do so, Smeak 
also said. 

Trout Run resident 
joins faculty 
at College 

James E. Temple, of Trout Run, 
recently accepted the position of elec- 
trical technology instructor at the Col- 
lege. 

Temple went to Montgomery High 
School apd California State College 
where he received his bachelor's degree. 

Before coming to the College, Tem- 
ple taught one year at Texas A&M. He 
also received his master's degree from 
Texas A&M. He then taught at 
Williamsport Area High School for 
seven years. 

What does Temple expect from his 
students? "I expect them to give me the 
best they have; you really can't ask for 
anymore than that." 

Temple said he wants to be treated 
fairly by his students because he treats 
his students fairly. 

alio speaks at workshop 

Anthony N. Cillo, associate pro- 
fessor of journalism, was a guest 
speaker at the Pottsville Republican 
High School Journalism Workshop, on 
the Schuylkill Campus of the Penn- 
sylvania State University, last Tuesday. 

He spoke to groups about story 
ideas, interviewing techniques and 
newspaper layout. 



SPOTLIGHTing 
...students 



HEAVE-HO 

...working hard on the 

universal gym 

one evening last week with 

a little help from a spotter 

(photo at right)... 

and 

GETTING A WORKOUT 

(pholo below) on the 

universal gym 

is Daniel L. Brooks, 

welding student 

from Blossburg. 

SPOTLIGHT photos 

By Richard E. Kopp Jr. 

Of The SPOTLIGHT Staff 





Center says 'thanks' to College for donation 



You have to register to 
vote to have your say in 
November. Tomorrow is 
the last day to register. 



Contributed by Lycoming Cfiild Day Center 
Mrs. Nancy J. Nesbitt, executive 
director of the Lycoming Child Day 
Care Center at 1663 Memorial Ave., 
says the Center recently saved hundreds 
of dollars thanks to a donation from the 
College. 

The College, which discontinued its 
Tot Watch program because of declin- 
ing student participation, donated two 
large tables, 12 chairs, a record player 
and assorted records, a bookcase, and a 
variety of toys, games, puzzles and 
books to the Center. 

Came at 'good lime' 
"Since we had just enrolled an ad- 
ditional class of 16, the donation came 
at a particularly good time. The gift 
meant that we did not have to purchase 



equipment for the newest classroom and 
saved us several hundred dollars. 
Everything is being used by the children 
and the Center is very appreciative of 
the College's donation." 

She added, "I find it interesting 
also that more Williamsport Area Com- 
munity College students than ever are 
using our Center this year. 

"About 15 of the College's 
students have children enrolled here so 
they are actually benefitting from the 
equipment which would have been used 
in the College's Tot Watch program had 
it not been discontinued." 

Helps them develop 

The Center, which is government 
subsidized, is open from 6:30 a.m. to 
5:30 p.m. during the week. The three to 



six-year-olds who are enrolled there 
follow a pre-school curriculum as well 
as a developmental learning activities 
program which is geared to different 
ages. As a child learns, grows, and 
discovers, the Center helps him/her 
develop social and emotional abilities 
also, the director said. 

Donald S. Shade, director of finan- 
cial aid at the College, said that the 
materials, originally purchased through 
student activities funds, had minimal 
resale value although they are perfectly 
usable and College officials felt it would 
be appropriate to donate the materials 
to a child care facility. The Lycoming 
Child Day Care Center was chosen as 
the recipient, he said, because it serves 
so many of the county's residents. 



6DSPOTUGBTDMoidi;, Ocl. I, 1M4 

Manufacturers' group meets on campus; advanced technologies areas visited 



Courtesy College Ii\formotion Office 
"A real eye-opener on what's 
available" is how one member of the 
West Branch Manufacturers' Associa- 
tion (WBMA) described a tour of the 
advanced technologies areas the College 
last Wednesday. 

The meeting between College ad- 
ministrators and more than 20 members 
of the WBMA was an outgrowth of a 
long range planning meeting last March. 
At that time, several WBMA members 
had indicated a desire to take a closer 
look at what the Community College 
has to offer. 

Programs spotlighted 
WBMA members were welcomed 
to the College by Dr. Robert L. 
Breuder, College president, and Robert 
S. Pursell, manager of the West Branch 
Manufacturers' Association. 

Following brief remarks, the 
visitors were divided into two groups 
and taken on tours of targeted areas 
which focused on advanced technology 
programs. 

Tours included the Microcomputer 
Lab and Computer Aided Design and 
Drafting (CADD) Lab in the new 
Lifelong Education Center. 

The CADD system represents the 
latest technologies in computer-aided 
design and drafting and will be available 
for the public to view at an open house 
at the College this Friday between 2 and 
6 p.m. 

Highly sophisticaled 
In the Technical Trades Center, 
visitors saw the updated, state-of-the-art 
labs for Alternating/Direct Current 
(AC/DC), Programmable Logic Motor 
Control, Metrology, Numerical Control 
(NC) and Computer Numerical Control 
(CNC), and Computer Aided Machin- 
ing (CAM) instruction. The Cam lab 
will eventually be hooked to the CADD 
system for a highly sophisticated train- 
ing network. The modern welding shop 
in the Metal Trades Center was also 
visited. 

Reaction, commenls given 
Following the tours. Dr. Breuder 
met with the group for reactions and 
comments. He noted that of all the 



equipment the WBMA members had 
just seen - $750,000 worth of instruc- 
tional equipment in the CADD and 
Microcomputer Labs alone - not a 
single local dollar was spent in acquiring 
any of that equipment. The CADD 
system, new off the assembly lime for 
IBM, and the 45 microcomputers in 
that lab, were all purchased through 
grants and state monies. 

The College president said that he 
feels it is important for business and in- 



dustry to work closely with the College 
and indicated a willingness to accept in- 
put from both. 

He noted that "as the 
marketplace shifts, students need to be 
prepared to shift in the marketplace and 
that's one way the Community College 
can serve business and industry." 
Others give presentations 

Grant Martin, coordinator of 
Specialized Technical Education Pro- 
grams at the College, told the WBMA 




AS LATE SUMMER seemed to be turning to Autumn last week, routine spruc- 
ing up was continued on the grounds of the Main Campus. Cooling Fall 
temperatures reminded some Ibal the mid-semester point is just a few weeks 

away. ISPOTLIGHT pholo by LeRoy S. W/iilmire Jr.J 



Part-Time job Openings Listed 

Infomalion about part-time jobs is provided by Lawrence W. Emery, director of 
Counseling, Career Development, and Placement. Additional iitformation is available 
from persons in that office which is in the Learning Resources Center 
Horticulture or Floriculture Students 
Attention horticulture or floriculture students: Start immediately, weekends 
now and from Thanksgiving to Christmas, according to Schedule, making wreaths 
and garlands and clerking in gift shop. Snyder's Nursery Outlet, RD 2, Route 45, 
Lewisburg. Call Mrs. Snyder or Mr. Tenorovich at 523-3052. 
Service Station Person 
Slonaker's Service Center needs part-time person to pump gas, change tires, 
bells, and hoses and to deliver customers. 20 to 35 hours a week. Hours flexible but 
must be before 6 p.m. Call Mrs. Slonaker at 326-9097 if interested. 



briefly how his office can provide in- 
dividualized Job training/retraining for 
their employees. 

The College's dean of develop- 
ment, Dr. Grant Berry Jr., made a brief 
presentation on the types of government 
funds available for companies to 
train/retrain workers. The Development 
Office can help companies secure the 
funding and ttie Specialized Technical 
Education Office can provide the train- 
ing mechanism, it was explained. 

Pursell noted that many businesses 
and industries are already finding that if 
they are going to have new technologies 
in their plants, they also need a 
mechanism with which to train their 
workers. "Let your ideas and needs 
flow back to the College," he urged the 
group. 

Represented at the meeting/tour 
were GTE Products Corporation, Mon- 
toursville; George E. Logue Manufac- 
turing Division Inc., Montoursville; 
Rhecm Manufacturing Company, 
Williamsport; Bethlehem Steel Corpora- 
iion, Williamsport; Pullman Powec 
Products, Williamsport; Phillips ECG, 
Inc., Williamsport; Pennsylvania Power 
& Light Company, Montoursville; Con- 
fair Bottling Company, Williamsport; 
Wright Sign Company, Montoursville; 
Grumman Allied Industries, Mon- 
tgomery RD 1; Paulsen Wire Rope 
Company, Sunbury; Brodart Inc., 
Williamsport; Emery Industries, 
Lewisburg, and the WBMA. 



BENSON 



€Mtn mini, ^ 
/9MWM market 



Corner of 3rcl and Mcynard Sts. 



Always Open 
Ail Night 
Sundays 
and Holidays 




Jean Edouard Vuillard was born in 
1868 and died in 1940. 



WWAS... 

Everything You 
Always Wanted in a 
Radio Station... and 
Less. 

* 8 a.m. to 10 a.m. * Classical 

* 10 a.m. to 12 p.m. * Jazz 

* 12 p.m. lo 6 p.m. * Top 40 
*6 p.m. to 12 a.m. ♦ Rock i Roll 



ANNUAL BOOK SALE 
Oct. 8-18 
30% -50% Off 

All hardbacks throughout our store ^ 
(general stock-many categories) 

THE LAST HURRAH BOOKSHOP 

937 Memorial Ave., 327-9338 

Sale hours: Mon., Wed., Fri., Sat., (9:30-6:30 p.m) 
Tues., Thurs. 2-7 p.m. 

BOOKS START AT 75« 




SPOTLIGHTDMonlijr, Ocl. I, IfMD? 




THIS doesn't exaclly look like a Theisminii to Brown connection, but it may do 
the job for what the stakes are worth... as the flag football tournameni winds 
down to the championship round. Photo depicts action in an early came 

fSPOTLIGHT photo by Gisela D. Grassleyj 

Cross country team suffers defeat 

The men's and women's cross country teams lost their first meet of the season, 
last Tuesday by a one-point margin for the men's team and a three-point margin 
for the women's team. 

Although the two teams lost, each took first and second place at the finish line. 

Wayne M. Parfitt, an auto body student from Pottsville, won the men's divi- 
sion with the time of 27:03 and teammate Bradley I. Alden, an aviation technology 
student from Tunkhanock, crossed about a minute and a half later with a 28:45 
timing. Other finishes for the College team were: Warren P. Renninger, a nursery 
management student from Williamsport, fourth place and a time of 30:08; Gregory 
S. Lange, an accounting student from Lock Haven, 14th place, a time of 34:06; 
James D. Cramer, an automotive student from Cleona, 15th place, 34:33, and 
William J. Dewald, a carpentry and building construction student from 
Williamsport, 17th place, 35:28. 

The women's team fared well for the first meet of the season with Jennifer 0. 
Kuyper, a retail management student from Troy, taking the first place honors with 
a time of 20:56 and teammate Sandra L. Langis, a dietetic technician student from 
Elysburg, just 21 seconds behind, for second place. Daria J. Beahm, an accounting 
student from Mill Hall, finished seventh with a time of 24:51; Stephanie M. 
McPeak, a general studies student from Centralia, was ninth with a clocking of 
27:55 and Kori M. Jones, a dietetic technician student from Pine Grove, finished 
10th with a timing of 27:58, 

Intramural league rosters avaUable 



Rosters are available in Room 137, 
Lifelong Education Center (LEC), for 
basketball and volleyball league com- 
petition, according to Mrs. JoAnn R. 
Fremiotti, coordinator of intramural 
athlefics and College activities. 

Anyone interested in the competi- 
tion should complete a roster and turn it 



into the Recreation Center Office by 
Wednesday, Oct. 10, said Mrs. 
Fremiotti. 

Mrs. Fremiotti added there still has 
not been enough interested response to 
form a soccer league. If anyone is in- 
terested in forming a league, contact the 
Recreafion Center Office, or Ext. 412. 




The Sidelines 



Sports Commentary 

By Rodney D. Hill 

SPOTLIGHT Sports Editor 



lul'^/^tihitujMHi/mnmiui/tt 



liMMIIUMilMlMVsMI 




The highlight of lhi.s professional 
football season will probably be the fact 
that the current rushing record, which is 
held by Jim Brown, should be reset. The 
closest person to him is Walter Payton 
of the Chicago Bears, who is less than 
100 yards away at the time of this 
wrifing. 

Franco Harris of the Seattle 
Seahawks and former star of the Pitt- 
sburgh Steelers was the threat to Brown 
at the start of the season, but he has not 
had the season that Payton has had thus 
far. 

Both backs are exceptional runners 
and class athletes, their uniforms should 
go to Canton, Ohio, because of their ac- 
complishments. But the name Jim 
Brown is also at the Hall of Fame, and 
in many people's minds he is regarded 
as the greatest running back ever, and 
some think he will never be matched by 
another back. 

It took Jim Brown nine years to 
establish the present record. If Walter 
Payton breaks the record it would have 
taken him 10 years, and if Franco Har- 
ris passes the mark set by Brown it will 
mark 13 years for his effort. 

Brown played about half of his 
career under a scheduled season of 12 
games, where Harris and Payton are 
playing with a 16 game schedule for 
about half of their career so far. So ob- 
viously Brown's averages gives him a 



more productive appearance than most 
running backs. 

Jim Brown was fortunate with the 
team he played with because he was 
normally the "work horse" of the team, 
and he usually got the call when the yar- 
dage was needed. Brown also played 
behind some fairly decent Hnes in his 
time while he was with the Cleveland 
Browns, and not to mention some of 
quarterbacks who mixed the game plan 
for the Browns. 

When talking about running backs 
such as Jim Brown in comparison to 
backs of today like the ones mentioned 
earlier, I really don't think they can be 
compared because of the new training 
aids and formations that are used in to- 
day's style of football. 

Personally speaking, if 1 were a 
coach, I'd be thrilled to have any one of 
those backs while they were in their 
prime. 

The evolution of running backs 
have proven over the years that records 
are to be long-lived but not impossible 
to break. The first player to establish 
the record was Cliff Battles back in 
1938, with 3,542 yards and since then it 
has been broken four different times. 
When the record was last broken by Jim 
Brown, he did it by annihilating Joe 
Perry's record of 8,378 yards. 

Brown too in his time may have 
been known as a new breed of runner. 



Basketball tryouts 
to be tomorrow 

Anyone interested in trying out for 
the College's intercollegiate basketball 
team, can do so at 4 p.m. tomorrow, 
according to Harry C. Specht, assistant 
professor of physical education. 

A meeting will be held in Room 
102, Bardo Gym. Those interested but 
unable to attend should contact Specht 
in Room 106, Bardo Gym, he said. 



We Three still steppin' in lead of bowling league- 



We Three remained in first place 
with five wins and one loss last week in 
the bowling league at ABC Lanes, ac- 
cording to information supplied by the 
lanes' management. 

Team standings 

Team Wins Losses 

1. We Three 5 1 

2. W.A.C.C. Five-0 4 2 

3. Scratch 4 2 

4. Dew Crew 3 3 

5. Pin Busters 3 3 

6 #5 3 3 

7 The Outlaws 2 4 

8 #8 6 



Top "5" Averages 

Mark E. Reamsnyder, 211. 
Myles S. Murray, 184. 
Rudy E. Long, 177. 
Barry A. Honey, 164. 
Shawn D. Burkhart, 157. 
Men's High Series 
Mark E. Reamsnyder, 584. 
Christopher L. Patrick, 561. 
Barry A. Boney, 507. 

Men's High Series 

Mark E. Reamsnyder, 584. 
Christopher L Patrick, 561 
Barry A Boney, 507 



Women's High Series 

Denise M. McNeil, 416. 
Team High Series 
W.A.C.C. Five-O, 1867. 
Scratch, 1777. 
Pin Busters, 1702. 

Team High Single 
W.A.C.C. Five-O, 643. 
Scratch, 615. 
#5, 615. 

Women's High Single 
Denise M. McNeil, 145. 
Men's High Single 
Mark E Reamsnyder, 207 
Barry A Boney, 202 
Christopher L Patrick, 194 



^ Sports A 
Schedule ^ 

Intramural Sports 
Flag FootbaU 

Monday: Scumbuzzards vs. Mean 
Moms (winners bracket final game), 5 
p.m. 

Tuesday: Home growns vs. Old 
Mill Oosers bracket), 5 p.m. 

Wednesday: Headbangers vs. 
Bums (losers bracket), 5 p.m. 

Intercollegiate Sports 

Men's and Women's Cross 
Country 

Saturday: Bucks County Com- 
munity College (CC) and Montgomery 
County CC at Montgomery County, 
noon. 

Golf 

Tuesday: Northamption County 
CC and Bucks County CC, home, 2 
p.m. 

Wednesday: EPCC tournament, 
home, 11 a.m. 

Sunday: PSCCJCAC tournament, 
away. 

All home golf and cross country 
events will be held at the White Deer 
Golf Course, eight miles south of 
Williamsport on Route 15. 



SaSPOTUGHTDMondij, Ocl. 8, IM4 

RIT representatives 
on campus today 

Represenlalives from the Rochester 
Institute of Technology will be here to- 
day in the Career Center, Room 157 of 
the Academic Center. 

Dr. John Stralton and Louis Gen- 
nero will be here to talk to students 
enrolled in electrical technology, 
engineermg technology, industrial draf- 
ting, civil engineering technology and 
tool design technology curriculums, ac- 
cording to Thomas C. Shoff, counselor 
and instructor for the center. 



Cillo's 

College Corner 

We'll prepare your 
favorite Subs and Burgers 
the way you like themi 



^ Play LUCKY NUMBERS 

and 

win a half sub 

plus medium drink 

I Four Winners 

Every Week 

Cillos lolltut fornn 
1100 W. Third SI., Wllliamiporl 
(Netl to Acidemic Cenlcr) 
Phcint Ahead: mini 
Huun: 7:30 B.m. lo 6:00 p.m. 
Monday Ihrvugh Friday 



BULLETIN BOARD 

For week of Monday, Ocl. 8 through Friday, Oct. 12 
SPORTS 
Golf... against Northampton County Community College, home, 2 p.m., 
tomorrow, Tuesday, Oct. 9. ^ . -^ , o 

Golf. EPCC Tournament, home, II a.m., tomorrow, Tuesday, Oct. 9. 

MEETINGS 
Women's Week planning... from noon lo 1 p.m., Wednesday, Oct. 10., in 
Room B107, Lifelong Education Center. „ „ „ „„ 

Phi Beta Lambda... 3:15 p.m., tomorrow, Tuesday, Oct. 9, Room 329, 
Academic Center. „ . „ n 

Alpha Omega Fellowship... 7 to 10 p.m., tomorrow, Tuesday, Ocl. 9, Room 
227, Academic Center. 

SALE 
Hot dog sale... 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., today, Monday, Oct. 8, Academic Center 
lobby, sponsored by Delta Phi Omega. 

SPECIAL ACTIVITIES 
Rollerskttling... 8 p.m. to midnight, this Thursday, Oct. 11, at Skating Plus. 
$2 admission or free to faculty, staff, and students with validated College identifica- 
tion Skate ren'als, 75 cents. Sponsored by the Student Government Association. 
SPECIAL EVENTS 
Frisbee... Good times Professional Disc Show featuring Ken Weslerfield and 
Brian McElwain, Canadian frisbee champions, 7 to 9 p.m., tomorrow, Tuesday, 
Oct. 9, in the Bardo Gymnasium. Admission free. Sponsored by the Student 
Government Association. 

Bloodmobile... from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., this Thursday, Ocl. 11, Room 138, 
Natural Resources Management Center. Sponsored by the American Red Cross and 
the Student Government Association. 

11 Students assist in local book sale 



Eleven College students, mainly 
from the broadcasting curriculum, par- 
ticipated in the annual book sale by the 
James V. Brown Library on Saturday, 
Sept. 29. 

The broadcasting students were 
Mark D. Flynn, of South Williamsport;. 
Frank J. Nierie, Cynthia E. Hartranft, 
and Stephen A. Mendez, all of 
Williamsport; James G. Heck, of Kane; 
Daria M. Diehl, of Milton, and Jeffrey 
S. Rachau, of Walsontown. 

Other students participating were 
Patti M. Harer, business administration 
student from Montoursville; Lene M. 



FREE! 

I Buy any Size Original Round Pizza at 
regular price and get the identical pizza 
free with this coupon! 
Take Out Only / Order Usually Ready in 10 Minutes 



WACC sludenls addlllonal 10% savings 

with ID on all regular menu prices 

With This Ad Only! 



LITTLE CAESARS 
GIANT PLAZA, GOLDEN STRIP 

327-8600 

MUST PRESENT COUPON 

WITH PURCHASE 

Offer valid thru Nov. 5 
..Not valid with anv other coupon 

To-- 




Zarzyczny, a general studies student 
from Williamsport; Cheryl D. Horn, an 
unclassified student from Linden, and 
Janice A. Lowry, a word processing stu- 
dent from Williamsport. 

According to Mrs. Linda J. 
Winiarczyk, instructor of broadcasting, 
the sale raised a total of $2,200. 

Student-run 

■■■ Continued from Page I 

The program provides a one-year 
certificate. 

Students prepare menus and learn 
to order supplies. In the practicum, 
students also prepare the meals, in- 
cluding a main entree with a choice of 
vegetable and drink. There is also an 
ala carte menu from which one may 
choose various luncheon selections. 

La Jeune Chef hours listed 
The student restaurant is open for lunch 
between 1 1 a.m. and 1 p.m. with daily 
specials served. "We are learning to 
prepare all kinds of foods, so we will 
not have any repeats as our specials." 
said Mrs. Patschke. 

In another response about the new 
restaurant, Beverly A. Harman, a stu- 
dent with the career exploration for 
adults program, of South Williamsport, 
stated, "It was a dining experience I'd 
recommend. It is a restaurant that will 
show our community what the College 
students are really learning." 



Women's Week 

■■■ Continued from Page I 

posals of an emergency loan service and 

a scholarshop project. 

North Campus involvement 
In another extension area, the forum 
has invited Dr. Kathryn L. Addy, direc- 
tor of the North Campus, to the 
Wednesday planning session. Miss Fer- 
rence noted that the forum wants to 
work with the North Campus' Women's 
Resource Network and plan projects 
that could be held at both campuses. 
Student input needed 

Another area that was examined at 
the last forum meeting was the need for 
an increase in student membership. 

Miss Ferrence noted that the group 
needs to elect student officers, and is 
desiring "student input" for ideas on 
programs, seminars, planning, and 
"whatever students feel is needed." 

For those who are interested in 
joining the forum, or becoming involved 
with planning for the "Women's 
Week" activities, may contact Miss Fer- 
rence at Ext, 398 or in the counseling 
oflice, next to the Library in the Learn- 
ing Resources Center. 

Town Doings 

DANCES 

Square dance. ..Swingin' Bees & 
Honeys with caller Russ Tingue at the 
Beehive, Yale Avenue, Williamsport, 8 
to 10:30 p.m., tomorrow. 
EXHIBITS 

Little League Baseball Interna- 
tional Museum... on Route 15 South, 
open daily from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. and 
Sundays from 1 to 5 p.m. 

Political art. ..ten years of graphic 
commentary, Lycoming College Art 
Gallery, first floor, Lycoming College 
Library, today through Thursday dur- 
ing library hours. 

Watercolors...by Karen Nicolls, all 
this month at the James V. Brown 
Library Community Room, 
Williamsport, during library hours. 
MUSIC 

Williamsport Symphony Or- 
chestra... Rolf Smedvig, conductor, 8 
p.m. tomorrow, Scottish Rite 
Auditorium. Featured will be the worid 
premier of "Fanfare for Williamsport" 
written by Smedvig. 

THEATRE 

Political satire. ..by Mark Russell, 
this Thursday at 8 p.m., Laraade Gym- 
nasium, Lycoming College. 

MISCELLANEOUS 
Paperback book swap. ..this Wednesday 
through Saturday at the Lycoming 
Mall, Muncy. Bring books to mall 
Wednesday through Friday, and swapp- 
ing will take place on Saturday. 



C 19a3 Little Caesar Entoprises, Inc 

valuable coupon H|| ^H I 



BECOME A BLOOD DONOR 

THURSDAY OCT. 11 

10 A.M. to 2 P.M. 

NATURAL RESOURCES CENTER 

ROOM 138 

We'll help. Will you? 



Forums on sponsorship issue to be held 
tomorrow and Wednesday: open to all 

Sponsorship question remains with county commissioners 



Two community forums will be held this week on the Community Col- 
lege sponsorship issue. One will be tomorrow evening and the other will be 
Wednesday evening. Both will begin at 7 p.m. and both will be in the 
Academic Center Auditorium. 

The forums are open to all including, of course, students of the Col- 
lege. 

Late last week and over the weekend, there were local media reports 
which: 

- said that two out of the three Lycoming County commissioners ap- 
pear not in favor of a referendum on the question of whether Lycoming 
County should sponsor the College on an interim basis, 

~ and that a comment by Lt. Gov. William W. Scranton 3rd about 
the state helping the College on the sponsorship problem did not imply 
that there was a special state plan waiting to be piit into effect. 

While the majority of the county commissioners appeared not to be in 
favor of a referendum, the commissioners, according to one report, said 
that did not mean they had negatively decided on the sponsorship pro- 
posal. So, the question of county sponsorship remains with the commis- 
sioners. 



Faced with a pull-out of the 20 school districts which have been part 
of a College sponsorship agreement. College officials went to the Lycoming 
County commissioners seeking interim sponsorship. 

During the past week, the Greater Williamsport Jaycees joined with 
other community groups in endorsing the county sponsorship proposal. 

Among the questions to be covered in the Tuesday and Wednesday 
forums, according to a College announcement, are: What happens if 
Lycoming County does not sponsor the College? What happens if it does? 
What will county sponsorship cost taxpayers? What do senior citizens 
stand to lose - or gain - from county sponsorship? Why turn to Lycoming 
County for sponsorship instead of going back to the districts or to the 
state? Why did the 20 school districts choose not to continue sponsorship 
of The Williamsport Area Community College after their sponsorship 
agreement expires on June 30, 1985? 

Additional information about the forums may be obtained from Dr. 
Miles Williams, dean of employee and community relations, at College 
Ext. 298. 



Spotlight 



V.4- 



. Monday. October 15, 1984 • Vol. 20, No. 8 • 8 Pages . 
Williamsporl Area Community CoUege • WUIiamsporl, Pa. 17701 



•J* 



iWeatherization 
program reviewed 
by Dr. Berry 

Dr. GranjLM. Berry Jr., dean of 
developmeifC has announced the im- 
plementation' of a weatherization pro- 
gram to be conducted at the College. 

The program is designed to bring in 
a total of about 400 people on subsidiz- 
ed employment from throughout the 
Commonwealth, with 20 people being 
» involved each week. 

AprU 1985 slaled 
«!■ The program is to start in April 
1985, and is being paid for by a branch 
of the Pennsylvania Department of 
Commerce in the amount of $69,629. 
There is the chance that the College 
could receive a multi-year award for the 
program. Dr. Berry said. 

■■■ Please Turn to Page 8 




Vine Avenue fire keeps city flremeD bus) last Wednesday afternoon. 
Firemen were at the scene for about 90 minutes. The occupants of the Vine 
Avenue building were listed as the Jesse Hoffman Jr. family on the 1052 side and 
the Stanlee Morrison family on the 1054 side. According to fire officials, (he fire 
was confined to both attics of Ibe wood frame structure, bat water damage was 
reported on the second and first floors. 



College Night to be held tonight; 
more than 80 colleges to be represented 

College Night is being held tonight from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. in the gymnasium. The program is being sponsored by the 
Lycoming County School Counselors Association. 

According to Michael Thompson, president of the association and a guidance counselor at Hughesville High School, 
more than 80 colleges and universities are participating in the program. Representatives from the institutions will answer 
questions about housing, campus visitation, financial aid and costs, programs of study, admissions standards and place- 
ment services. 

The program is free of charge and all persons interested in pursuing a postsecondary education are encouraged to at- 
tend. 

D D D 

The following colleges will be represented tonight: Albright College: Alliance College; Alvernia College; 

Art/Fashion Institute of Pittsburgh; Beaver College; Bloomsburg University of Pennsylvania; Bucknell University; 

. . _4 _. ■■« Please turn to Paze 8 



Transfer Day' 
this afternoon 

The College's annual Transfer Day 
will be held today from 1:30 to 3:30 
p.m. in the gym, according to Thomas 
C. Shoff, instructor-counselor. 

Twenty-six colleges will be 
represented. Included are B|oonisburg_ 
University, Clarion Oniversity, , 
Delaware Valley College, Edinboro 
University of Pennsylvania. 

And, Elizabethtown College, 
Gwynedd-Mercy College, Indiana 
University of Pennsylvania, King's Col- 
lege, Lo±.HaveD University, Lycpjning 
College, Mansfield University. 

Also,"'Mittersville University, Penn 
State University, Robert Packer 
Hospital School of Nursing, Rochester 
I nstitut e of Jechnology. ShippejrsbuTg 
University, Slipperj^ Rock University, 
Spring GardfrrTbllege, Susquehanna 
University. 

Teniple University, University of Scran- 
ton, Unversity of Pittsburgh at Brad- 
ford, West Chester University, Wilkes 
College, Williamsport Hospital School 
of Nursing, and York College. 

Representatives of these colleges 
will be available todiscuss credit 
transferring and other related informa- 
tion. 



250 attend frisbee show 



The Good Times Professional 
Disc Show, sponsored by the Stu- 
dent Government Association 
(SGA), was "well attended", said 
Steven D. Metzker, SGA president 
and business management student 
from Williamsport. 

The event, held last Tuesday 
evening in the Bardo Gym, drew a 
turnout of 250 and featured Ken 
Westerfield, the winner of the 
1982-83 Canadian frisbee title. 



^ 



^■' 



2DSPOTLIGHTDMond«y, Oclober IS. 1984 



Coach makes points 
in regard to sports 
cut issue at College 



Letter to the Editor 




Dear Editor, 

Several points should be made 
In regard to the recent recommen- 
dation by the College's administra- 
tion to discontinue Intercollegiate 
athletics. 

(1) A well conceived and ade- 
quately funded intercollegiate sports 
program provides opportunities for 
the students to: (a) participate in 
sports that are not normally part of 
an Intramural program such as 
cross-country running, and (b) com- 
pete at a skill level above a normal 
intramural program. 

(2) An Intercollegiate sports 
program could be an excellent 
marketing tool for attracting 
students who are interested in both 
the educational opportunities of the 
College and have athletic skills and 
interest at an intercollegiate level. 

(3) Lack of participation Is not 
supportable as evidenced by cross- 
country and basketball turnouts 
over the past several years. In tact, 
this year the College has fielded a 
women's cross-country team for the 
first time in its history. 

(4) Lack of spectators Is a 
"smokescreen." Participation is 



what is important, I'd much rather 
have 50 runners on the cross- 
country teams instead of 5 runners 
and 45 spectators. We are NOT 
Penn State or Williamsport Area 
High School. 

(5) Since the intercollegiate 
sports program is funded by student 
activity fees, it is improper to 
dissolve this program without stu- 
dent input. 

A possible solution so all sides 
of the question could be adequately 
addressed would be to establish a 
committee consisting of students, 
faculty and administrators. 

After working with the 
College's men's and women's 
cross-country teams over the last 
three years, it is my feeling that a 
well-run. adequately-funded, and 
administratively-supported Inter- 
collegiate sports program would be 
a very valuable asset to the school 
community. 

Sincerely, 

Phillip D. Landers 

Associate professor of business 

Cross-country coach 



SPOTLIGHT 
Monday. October 15. I9B4 - Vol. 20. No. 8 

The SPOTLIGHT Is published each Monday morning of the academic year, except lor College 
yacalions, t>y lournalism and other interested sludenls ol The Williamsport Area Community College 
,■,.? i'i? "°'"" '• Academic Center, 1005 W Third SI,, Williamsporl. Pa. 17701 Teleohone- 
(717) 326-3761. Extension 221 



Opinions expressed are those ol the student newspaper or of those whose names accompany 
Hems. Opinions do not roriect ottlcial opinion ol the Institution. 

The SPOTLIGHT is a member ol me Columbia Scholaslic Press /Issocialion 

THE STAFF 
Donna M. Barnell. Managing EO,(or,Karen M. Melarko, Edilonal Page f o.lor Gisela Grasslev 
,T!',"S':' tT-''r.'A ^'='"="'^^' A,m,n,sl,auve Allwrs M,rorJames K iSomSey.Sem 

.Affairs fd«Of,KathrynM Gilbert, /tdreflfsmglWanager Rodney D - '■ - .'■-"""'" 

Jr. Senior Slall Writer 



s Ediloi. Richard E Kopp 



REPORTERSISTAFF ASSOCIATES 

H.J^T1L w°m';' "^^'f '^ S^ Callahan, Kathleen L, Elswert. Roxanne A. Goodier. George I 
STn^h ? I ^ o T'-, *""^ ^ "°'^"""' °°'^"' E """"ford. Sandra L, Musgraye, Judith L 
Swinehart, Sandra R Taylor, James E Treese. Jenniler S. While, LeRoy S. Whilmire Jr.. Canda M 

Faculty adviser Anthony N. Cillo. 



Donna M. Bametl, productio 
Gilbert, copy editor. Wanna F Br 
Jr., production assistants 



Production Staff This Is8u« 
I supervisor, Richard E Kopp Jr , videocomposition: Kathryn M 
3wn, Kathleen L Etsw^erl, Donald E. Mumlord, LeRoy S Whitmire 



State Teachers Strike 
hurts everyone involved 

SPOTLIGHT commentary on school strike effects 



W/ork strikes involving public 
school teachers have become an in- 
creasingly distressful problem. En- 
tire communities are adversely af- 
fected when teachers take to the 
picket line. At present, over 28.000 
students in Pennsylvania are taking 
unscheduled "vacations'. 

Hindering students plans 
Consider the plight of the 
would-be high school senior, fylany 
of these students have planned the 
summer to come. If they have to at- 
tend school then because of a 
lengthy strike, it may affect plans to 
attend summer college courses or 



to enlist in the military service. 

I^any striking districts preclude 
any athletic events. This may 
seriously hinder an athlete from ob- 
taining a much-needed scholarship 
in order to afford attending college. 
Alternatives unproductive 
It has been proven that the 
longer a strike continues, the more 
detrimental it is to the community in- 
volved. Days made up on Saturdays 
and beyond the scheduled end of 
the school year are unproductive or 
even counter-productive to educa- 
tional goals. 



Bestseller well-done 

SPOTLIGHT book review 
by Sandra L. Musgrave 



When in the mood to curl up for 
awhile and relax with a good book, be 
sure to make the book choice of "The 
Auberbach Will" by Stephen Burm- 
ingham. 

The book was on the New York 
Times Bestseller list for five months 
and it certainly lives up to its populari- 
ty. 

It Is a moving story about the very 
rich - their successes, theii^ failures, 
and their loves. The book is very well- 
written and holds interest from beginn- 
ing to end. 

Mystery show reaches 
peak of professionalism 

SPOTLIGHT review by Diane J. Hassinger 

Since life adds a dash of mystery for each of us. the 
new television program, "Ivlurder, She Wrote", is an 
enlightening new approach to television viewing which can 
be enjoyed by all ages. 

Based on a novel by the famous mystery writer 
Agatha Christie. "l\/lurder. She Wrote" promises to be 
an exciting hour of suspense. If it continues with Ivls. 
Christie's excellent flair for creating an intricate web of 
intrigue and suspense, the show promises to give an 
original twist to the usual mystery theme. 

Atypical main character praised 

One of the most striking aspects about "Ivlurder, She Wrote" Is that the main 
character is a delightful older woman, and it is refreshing to see an elderly 
character play such a vital and appealing role. Angela Lansberry is a terrific ac- 
tress who depicts an excellent portrayal In the starring role. 

Unlike the usual series with the beautiful young actress and/or the handsohne 
young actor. Jessica - the main character - is an attractive mature woman and 
an established mystery writer from (vlaine. 

In the first two-hour special, she finds herself helping the police solve a real 
murder during her visit with her nephew in New York City. In the second episode, 
she becomes involved in helping a bridegroom in San Francisco clear himself of 
a murder charge. 

Viewers will become Christie fans 

Agatha Christie fans should find "Ivlurder, She Wrote" to be a worthy addi- 
tion to their mystery collection. And those who never have read Ivls. Christie's 
novels should find themselves quickly becoming Christie fans after watching the 
show. 




NOTICE: 



We have received a letter to ttie editor concerning a police raid for 
underage drinking that Involved College students. The editor would 
appreciate the writer coming to or phoning the SPOTLIGHT office in 
order to verify the signature to publish the letter. 



SPOTLIGHTOMonday, Oclobtr IS. I9841j3 



•How much do you 
know about blood? i 



1. A typical adult has approximately 10-12 pints of blood in the body: Inie or 
false. 

2. Blood supplies oxygen, water, and nutrients to all the cells of the body: true or 
false. 

i. It is estimated that blood can make one complete cycle through the circulatory 
stystem in approximately one day: true or false. 

4. Blood is composed of four parts-red cells, white cells, platelets and plasma: 
True or False 

5. If a person is ill and need a transfusion, he or she must be given all four parts of 
the blood: true or false. 

6. The most common blood disorder is leukemia: (rue or false. 

7. The main function of red cells is to transport oxygen from the lungs to the 
tissues and to transport carbon dioxide from the tissues to the lungs: true or false. 

8. The main function of platelets is to control bleeding: true or false. 

9. The main function of while cells is to fight infection and help develop immunity: 
true or false. 

10. You can give blood every eight weeks: true or false. 

11. Since scientists still have not discovered a method to make artificial blood, it is 
very neccessary to continue to donate blood: true or false. 

12. When a person donates a unit of blood, the body reproduces the fluid loss in 
five days; true or false. 

•sso| pmy »B|d3j oj sjnoq f-£ sb «aj st S35|B) )i :3S|b/ 71 'anji 
'U '"U) '01 '9IU) ■(! '3nj| -g 'anjj -^ ejaMUB s; jspjosip poo|q Domuio} isooi 3qi 
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^nnsnbsj] pas |np)$«H si u iasp} s '»iui -f Xpoq aqi {o \ya31a a|a|dnio9 « »^<tm 
0| spno33s PI ^piBUiixoJddB poo|q S9)|8| I! ;as|Bj f 'anji 7 'aoi) i :$)OmSNV 



BLOODMOBILE 
WHERE 

The Bardo Gym 



WHEN 

Oct. 30, 31-9:45 a.m. to 3:45 p.m. 

WHY 

To save lives 



Keep Red Cross ready. 



+ 



College raises 
over $4,000 so far 
for United Way 

After one full week of campaign- 
ing, the College has raised $4,839.91 for 
the United Way, according to William 
C. Bradshaw, the College's Lycoming 
United Way Fund Drive coordinator. 

According to Bradshaw, the total 
raised has been greatly affected by "the 
generous giving of staff such as Diana 
L. Kuhns, coordinator of the Tutoring 
Center, Russell E. Spring, carpenter, 
and James A. Garland, aviation instruc- 
tor... and others." He noted that these 
and others have given one or more 
hours of salary per month for one year. 
[Giving of "an hour's salary" accounts 
for the so-called "odd number" in the 
total donation figure.] 

Bradshaw said, "LUW maintains 
that giving is a personal thing. Certainly 
not everyone could or should be a 
generous giver... But everyone can and 
should give something. 

"After all, there are few - if any ~ 
of us who honestly can say we have not 
at sometime in our lives been helped by 
one or more of the 32 LUW agencies. 
You cant get much more personal than 
that." 



Job opportunity for students llllllllllllllllll 



Trading Spaces operates a nation- 
wide accommodations exchange net- 
work which provides free accommoda- 
tions and meals, in college-family 
homes, to student members. They are 
seeking campus travel representatives 
(0 link over 500 college to the reserva- 
tions system via the representative's 
personal computer. For the job 
description, see Mrs. Matilda S. Elmer 
in the Counseling, Career Development 
and Placement Office in the Learning 
Resources Center. 

Artists Unlimited 
plans field trip 

Artists Unlimited is sponsoring a 
field trip to The MetropoUtan Museum 
of Art in New York City this Wednes- 
day, according to Patrick D. Murphy, 
assistant professor of advertising art and 
club adviser. 

The bus will leave at 6 a.m. from in 
front of the Building Trades Center. It 
will depart from St. Patrick's Cathedral 
in New York City at 8 p.m. Estimated 
time of arrival back at the College 
is around midnight 

Accompanying advertising art 
students on the trip will be students in 
classes taught by Dr. Daniel J. Doyle, 
professor of government and history. 




$1 (with ID) Tonight 7:30 p.m. 

$2 (without ID) I ACC Auditorium 

iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii^^ 



4DSPOTLICHTDMoiid«y, October 15, 1984 



SERVICE AND OPERATION OF 
HEAVY CONSTRUCTION EQUIPMENT 
STUDENTS WORKING AT INDIAN 



PARK IN MONTOURSVILLE 



The Indian Park Project 
was started around May 11, 
19B4 and is expected to take 
two years to compiete. 

This project wiii benefit 
over 100 students of the Coi- 
iege. The students will be us- 
ing 26 pieces of construction 
equipment to develop and 
grade the playground area, 
create parking areas, build In- 
ternal roads and enlarge the 
existing pond to three times 
Its size. The pond will then be 
used for fishing and 
sailboating. 



In a comment given for a 
College news release Mayor 
John Dorin, Montoursvile, said 
the Borough estimates It will 
save approximately $200,000 
by having the College 
students do the earth work. 

He said the Borough feels 
that it would not have been 
able to undertake this project 
without such external support 
as the College Is providing. 
"We would not have been able 
to generate the necessary 
funds for a project of this size. 
We looked at the Community 
College to do the work 
because we have high respect 
for what the College has to of- 
fer and felt that the project 
would benefit both parties. . 
.the Borough and the 
College." 

The Borough will attempt 
to raise $75,000 with a fund- 
raising drive. They will ask 
area businesses to donate 
funds for the project. 



Among the equipment the 
students will be using to 
renovate the 22 acre park 
are: Bulldozers, scrapers, 
motorgrader, rollers and dump 
trucks. 

Approximately 100,000 
yards of material will be 
removed from the pond and 
redistributed over the site. 



The park, when It is complete, 
will contain picnic pavlllions, 
nature and fitness trails, boat 
docks, benches, play area and 
an outdoor amplltheater. 




Edward J. Stellar, of Kulpmont excavating the land on a John 
Deere truck loader 



Dan H. Painter, of Glen- 
moore is working on the gradall, 
he is taking earth out of the bot- 
tom of where the pond is to be. 





Checking the grade is John 
A. Kozorosky, of Johnstown. 



HauUng the earth out of the pond bed and over to other 
parts of the park that need fdled in. 





spots. 



Dumping the dirt so it can later be used to fill in the low 



This tall "whatchamacallit" 
is used to dig out the bottom of 
the pond. 



SPOTLIGHTDMondiy, October 15, 1984n5 




Brian T. Shippling, of St. Marys is grading tlie fill on tlie cat 
dozer. 




Edward W. Masser, of Allenwood is worldng on the catwhee! 
loader. It is his job to load the dump trucks 




SPOTLIGHT Photos by 

Richard E. Kopp Jr 

of the SPOTLIGHT Staff 






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6oSPOTLICHTDMoaday, Odobrr IS. 1984 



ACROSS 



1 The urial 

4 Wise persons 

9 Crafty 

12 Lamprey 

13 Worship 

14 Cravat 

15 Come into 
view 

17 Traps 
19 Harvests 

21 Beverage 

22 Deposits 
24 Flap 
26 Pierce 
29 Nuisances 
31 Hit lightly 

33 Honest — 

34 Negative 
prefix 

35 Soak up 
37 Cut of meal 

39 Note of scale 32 Cushion 

40 Pinch 36 Stroke 



guard 

4 Epic sea tale 

5 Skilled 

6 Proceed 

7 Bitter vetch 

8 Dispatched 

9 Layers 

10 Falsehood 

1 1 Affirmative 
16 Remains at 

ease 
18 Roman 

bronze 
20 Posed for 

portrait 

22 Twirls 

23 Uncanny 



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humbugl" 

27 More 
competent 

28 Animal 
30 Cry 



42 Prohibit 
44 Cupolas 
46 Trade for 

money 
48 Bushy clump 

50 Fruit cake 

51 Organ of 
hearing 

S3 Carried 
55 Tinted 
58 Public official 

61 Help 

62 Railroad 
station 

64 flan's 
nickname 

65 Footlike part 

66 Scorches 

67 Consume 

DOWN 

1 Bishopric 

2 Dress border 

3 Puts on I 



38 Choral 
composition 



1 Begs 
3 Negative 
5 Title of 

respect 
^ Young boy 
) Giver of gift 
? Cincinnati 

ballplayers 
I Small 



children 

55 Weaken 

56 Hasten 

57 River in 
Scotland 

59 Brown kiwi 

60 Still 
63 Parent: 

colloq. 





Spangler to speak 
with the students 
of broadcasting 

Robert Spangler of Susquehanna 
Sounds, Mulli Recording School will 
speak lo broadcasting students regar- 
ding multi-media recording during 
classes on Oct. 17, according to IVlrs. 
Linda J. Winiarczyk, instructor of 
broadcasting. 

Spangler has had many years of ex- 
perience in the recording field including 
ten years in the operation of his own 
studio. He also has a background in 
technical engineering. He has been in- 
volved in design and engineering con- 
cepts that have been adopted by 
manufacturers of audio console and 
tape recording in production of their 
current models in their state-of-the-art 
professional recording products. 

■ /^.:>. Rini nwa 0199 n I 



■W) Buy One PIZZA 



Get One FREE! 



®jm^@mMJs^_ j 



College nurse provides list 
of local support groups 

A list of local support organiza- 
tions in the Williamsport area have been 
provided by Mrs. Janet R. Querimit, 
R.N., College nurse. 

Among the local support groups 
available at the Williamsport Hospital 
are the Epilepsy Support Group, which 
meets the third Tuesday of each month 
from 7 to 9 p.m.; Sexually Transmitted 
Disease Clinic (V.D.) is available 24 
hours per day. Persons desiring this 
treatment must ask for the state clinic 
and the treatment is free; The Family 
Planning Clinic is available from 8 a.m. 
to 4 p.m. daily. Appointments are 
necessary. 

The Lycoming Valley Association 
for the Deaf meets Saturday at 7 p.m. at 
115 W. Third Street, Williamsport. 

The Diabetes Support Group meets 
four times a year for general meetings at 
Divine Providence Hospital, 
Williamsport, at 7 p.m. 

The M.S. Self Help Group meets 
the fourth Thursday of the month at the 
St. John's Methodist church in 
Newberry at 7 p.m. 

Alcoholics Anonymous and Nar- 
cotics Anonymous groups meet almost 
daily and Lycoming County Health Im- 
provement Services can provide a 
schedule. They can be reached at 
Academy Street in Williamsport or by 
calling 322-7605. 



Clemente R. Medo, left, electrical technology sludenl from Monloursvllle, and 
Dr. Edward N. Moser, will lake part in the 1984 CROP Walk for Hunger this 
Sunday. Dr. Robert L. Breuder, College president, middle, and Dr. Moser have 
sponsored Medo. (SPOTLIGHT Pholo by Richard E. Kopp Jr.) 

CROP Walk this Sunday 
fights world hunger problem 

James K. Morrissey 
Sludenl Affairs Editor 

Williamsport area churches, students, 
schools, citizens, and College students 
will participate in the 1984 CROP Walk 
for Hunger this Sunday. 

The Walk, sponsored by the 
United Churches of Lycoming County, 
"will raise funds to aid those people 
throughout the world who live each day 
in poverty without enough to eat," said 
JoAnn R. Fremiotti, coordinator of in- 
tramural athletics and College activities 
and a contact recruiter for the event. 

The Walk will begin at 2 p.m. at 
Brandon Park. Registration for par- 
ticipants will be at 12:30 p.m. at the 
same location. 

Mrs. Fremiotti added that anyone 
who wishes to take part in the Walk 
may contact her in Room 108, Bardo 
Gym, all this week. 

"Anyone who wants to take part 
may choose to walk either three, six, or 
10 miles on Sunday. To help raise funds 
for the world's hungry, they can pick up 
a sponsor sheet from me in Room 108 
of the Bardo Gym and get people to 
sign those sheets who will agree to pay 
that walker a certain amount of money 
per mile after the event." * 

CROP is the name given to local » 
community hunger education and fund 
raising events sponsored by the Church 
World Service, an international relief, 
development, and refugee resettlement 
agency, according to Church World Ser- 
vice literature. 20 percent of the money 
collected will come back to the local 
community for hunger projects, and 80 
percent is given to the Church World 
Service for overseas hunger and self- 
development projects like well drilling in 
Pakistan and fish farming in Indonesia. 

"It does not matter what religious 
denomination you belong to, anyone is 
welcome to walk three, six, or 10 miles 
to help defeat world hunger. This in- . 
eludes college faculty, staff and Sfa« 



Mrs. Fremiotti said. 
"If someone is unable to participate this 
Sunday, they can at least sponsor a per- 
son that will." 

"World hunger is something you 
only hear about. Events like the CROP 
Walk help the locally needy and make 
us confront the problem at our 
doorsteps," she concluded. 



Voters drive nets 
206 this month 

The League of Women Voters on- 
campus voter registration drive earlier 
this month signed up 206 eligible voters 
for the November election, according to 
JoAnn R. Fremiotti, coordinator of in- 
tramural athletics and College activities. 




88.1 FM 

Everything You 

Always Wanted in a 

Radio Station... and 

Less. 



12p.n 



* Classical 
: Rocl< S Roll 



Commercial Free 



Can you imagine playing your 
favorite sport for a million dollars per 
year? I like playing my favorite sports 
because of the competition. 

Some people gel so upset with the 
fact that that "jocks" are worth more 
than they are. If an owner of a profes- 
sional sports team has the money to 
give, and the team is not hampered by 
it, then why not? The players who are 
worthy of the million dollar seasons 
probably bring that much more to the 
gates. 

Although some franchises pay big 
money to exceptional athletes, there has 
been a good number of "flops" after 
the contract was signed. 
••• 

One case of a flop was with the 
Cleveland Indians where they paid 
$120,(XX) when they signed a promising 
young pitcher out of high school, who 




The Sidelines 



Sports Commentary 

By Rodney D. Hill 

SPOTLIGHT Sports Editor 



AitWmw^ii n« I MM «a,iMNM«l»kl«4iN<M«ni 




averaged almost 18 strikeouts per game. 
The players name was Billy Joe David- 
son. He never made it to the major 
leagues; he only made to class B ball 
where he posted a record of one win and 
five losses. 

There has also been some trades in 
the world of sports that have seemed un- 
fair, or even amazing to know that one 
individual is so talented that he is equal 
to four or five players from another 
team. 



In the early days of sports, some 
trades have taken place that seemed 
more humiliating than unfair. 

The immortal Babe Ruth was a 
known trade when he was traded from 
the Boston Red Sox to the New York 
Yankees for a mortgage on Fenway 
Park. Back around the turn of the cen- 
tury when Canton, Ohio had a baseball 
team, they traded the player who was 
later regarded as one of the finest pit- 
chers ever, and one of the most 



SPOTlICHTaMonday, October 15, 19840 ( 

distinguished pitchers award was named 
after him. Yes, Cy Young was traded 
from Canton to Cleveland for a suit of 
clothes. Another great player traded 
was Lefty Grove; he was traded from a 
Martinsburg, West Virginia team to 
Baltimore for a center field fence. 

I have two trades in mind that 
would have to rank as a tie for the most 
humiliating or perhaps the most 
humorous. 

A first baseman named Jack Fen- 
ton went from a San Francisco team to 
a Memphis team for a box of prunes. 
How about this one? How could a 
former baseball player ever tell his 
grandchildren that he once played for a 
team until he was traded to another 
team for a Thanksgiving turkey? Well, 
Johnny Jones probably had to do just 
that when he was traded from Chat- 
tanooga to Charlotte, North Carolina. 



Three teams share first place Cross country team wins triangular 



In recent weeks. We Three were 
alone at the top of the team standings 
but W.A.C.C. Five-0 and Scratch have 
moved to the top for a share of first 
place. Teams #Jand US are surely living 
up to their names as they are in those 
spots in the standings, according to 
ABC Lanes management. 
Team standings 



Team 


Wins Losses 


1. We Three 


7 2 


2. W.A.C.C. Five-0 


7 2 


3. Scratch 


7 2 


4. Pin Busters 


5 4 


5. No. 5 


4 5 


6. Dew Crew 


3 6 


7. The Outlaws 


3 6 


8. No.8 


9 



Anyone interested in 
bowling in competition should 
come to the ABC Lanes 1245 
Park Avenue, Williamsport on 
Tuesday at 4 p.m. 

Intramural sports 
forms available i 

Forms are available in Room 137, i 
Lifelong Education Center (LEC), for | 
intramural basketball, indoor soccer t> 
and wrestling, according to Mrs. JoAnn ? 
R. Fremiotti, coordinator of intramural 
athletics and College activities. | 

The indoor soccer and basketball J 
intramurals will start at the end of Oc- 
tober or early November. Intramural 
wrestling will not start until next 
semester, said Mrs. Fremiotti. 

Anyone who is interested should 
stop by the Recreation Center Office or 
call Ext. 412. 

B-ball practice 
tomorrow 

There will be varsity basketball 
practice at 4 p.m., tomorrow, Oct. 16 in 
the Bardo Gym, according to Harry C. 
Specht, professor of education. 

Anyone not able to attend but 
wants more information should contact 
Specht in Room 106, Bardo Gym, or 
Ext. 417. 



High Team Series 

Scratch, 1917. 
Pin Busters, 1894. 
No. 5, 1818 

High Team Single 
Scratch, 713. 
No. 5, 653. 
Pin Busters, 635. 

Men's High Series 
Barry A. Boney, 592. 
Joseph D. DeCarli, 537. 
Rudy E. Long, 530. 

Men's High Single 
Barry A. Boney, 223. 
Joseph D. DeCarli, 198. 
Myles S. Murray, 191. 

Top 5 Averages 
Mark E. Reamsnyder, 205. 
Myles S. Murray, 172. 
Rudy E. Long, 172. 
Christopher L. Patrick, 166. 
Barry A. Boney, 166. 

On June 6, 1882, in India, a 
cyclone and tidal wave killed 100,000 in 
Bombay. 



The men's cross country team won its third and fourth meets of the season last 
Saturday with a forfeit win against the Delaware County Community College and a 
24 to 31 decision over the Luzenie County Community College. 

The women's team was less fortunate with its meet as they could not fill a full 
team for competition. They lost one on the day, because of a no contest against 
Delaware County Community College for the same reason. 

Wayne M. Parfitt, an auto body student from Pottsvilie, continued his winn- 
ing ways as he placed first in as many meets that he had run, which was four. 

Jennifer 0. Kuyper, a reuil management student from Troy, has also won all 
of her races without finishing less than the top runner in the women's competition 

In men's results, Parfitt finished first with a time of 26:32; Bradley I. Alden 
an aviation technology student from Tunkhannock, was third with a 28:14 timing- 
Warren P. Renninger, a nursery management student from Williamsport, finished 
fourth with a time of 29:26; Gregory S. Lange, an accounting studem from Lock 
Haven, eighth and a time of 32:25; James D. Cramer, an automotive student from 
Cleons, llth place, 33:30, and William J, Dewald, a carpentry and building con- 
stniction student from Williamsport, finished 13th with a 33:52 timing. 

In women's competition, with a time of 21:07, Miss Kuyper broke the ribbon 
by more than three minutes ahead of the second place finisher. Teammate Daria J 
Beahm, an accounting student from Mill Hall, finished fifth with a time of 25:09 
and Donna L. Erlston, a general studies student from Danville, finished ninth with 
a time of 27:24. 

The wins for the men's team increases its overall record to 4-1 and 20 in con- 
ference meets. 

The women's team dropped to 0-2 overall and 0-1 in conference meets in its 
first season ever at the College. 



'■ We ask, you answer 
Only one time in major league 
baseball did a team go into a game 
with the same batting averages and at 
the end of the game they still had the 
same averages. Now how did this 
happen? 

Name the only National league 
football player who experinced the 
best and the worst for an entire 



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Lisa R. Wiltiams, a secretarial science student, of Williamsporl, shows a Utile of 
herfrisbee throwing background. (SPOTLIGHT Photo by Gisela D. Grassley) 



Intramural Sports 

Flag Football 

Monday: Young Invaders vs. 
Bums, 5 p.m. 

Tuesday: Homegrowns vs. 
LaBusch Boys, 5 p.m. 

Wednesday: Mean Moms vs. win- 
ner of Homegrowns and LaBusch Boys, 
5 p.m. 

Thursday: Winners of Monday's 
and Wednesday's games, 5 p.m. 

Note: The rainouts in intramural 
flag football will be made up in the 
following ways: Monday's rainouts will 
be made up on the following Wednes- 
day. Wednesday rainouts will be made 
up on the following Monday. Tuesday 
rainouts will be made up on the follow- 
ing Thursday. Thursday rainouts will be 
made up on the following Tuesday. 

TYPING FOR STUDENTS 
Will type reports, term papers, etc. 
60 cents per page-double spaced 
90 cents per page-single spaced 
Call: 323-8488 



8aSPOTLIGHTDMond«.v. Ocrober 15, 1984 

College Night to be held tonight 

■■■ Conlinued/rom Page I _. 

Cabrini College. , „ , • „ • r l i 

California University of Pennsylvania; Carlow College; Cedar Crest College; Central Pennsylvania Business School; 
Chatham College; Chestnut Hill College; Clarion University of Pennsylvania; College Misercordia. 

Delaware Valley College; Dickinson College; East Stroudsburg University of Pennsylvania; Edinboro University of 
Pennsylvania; Elizabethtown College; Gannon University. 

Geisinger School of Nursing; Geneva College; Gettysburg College; Grove City College; Gwynedd-Mercy College; 
Harcum Junior College; Immaculata College; Indiana University of Pennsylvania; Ithaca College. 

Also, Johnson and Wales College; Juniata College; Keystone Junior College; King's College; Kutztown University of 
Pennsylvania; I^Roche College. 

LaSalle University; Lafayette College; Lebanon Valley College; Lock Haven University of Pennsylvania; Lycoming 
College; Manor Junior College; Mansfield University of Pennsylvania. 

Marywood College; Messiah College; Millersville University of Pennsylvania; Moravian College; Mount Aloysius 
Junior College; Muhlenburg College; Pennsylvania Stale University, Philadelphia College of Performing Arts. 

Philadelphia College of Pharmacy and Science; Point Park College; Pratt Institute; Robert Morris College; Robert 
Packer Hospital School of Nursing; Rochester Institute of Technology. 

□ D D 

Saint Francis College; Saint Vincent College; Seton Hill College; Shippensburg University of Pennsylvania; Slippery 
Rock University of Pennsylvania; Spring Garden College; SUNY-Cobleskill Agricultural and Technical College. 

Susquehanna University; Temple University; Thomas Jefferson University; University of Pittsburgh at Bradford; 
University of Scranlon; Valley Forge Junior College; Villa Maria College. 

Waynesburg College; Wellesley College; West Chester University of Pennsylvania; Westminister College; Wilkes 
College; Williamsport Hospital School of Nursing; Williamsport School of Commerce; Wilson College; Williamsport 
Area Community College; and York College. 

Dr. Berry 

Cominued from Page /■■■ 

Dr. Berry added that there are two 
distinct advantages to be garnered from 
the program. 

Advantages cited 

--By being held at the College, it 
will be a showcase for the programs 
taught here, thus it will be a natural 
recruiting device. 

-With 400 people coming to the 
College, the community will benefit in 
the form of money to be spent on room, 
board, and entertainment. Dr. Berry 
said that a conservative estimate would 
be from $120,000 to $160,000 for the 
first year. 

The program was designed by two 
staff members of the College, Dr. Ralph 
A. Home, director of construction 
technology, and Dr. William J. Martin, 
director of secondary vocational pro- 
gram. 



BULLETIN 
BOARD 

For Ihe week of Monday, Oct. 15 
through Friday, Oct. 19 
MOVIE 
'•Never Cry Wol/"...l:iO p.m., 
tonight, Academic Center Auditorium. 
Admission $1 with College ID, $2 all 
others. 

MEETINGS 
Biology C/b*... organizational meeting, 
tomorrow, 3:30 p.m. Room 142A, 
Lifelong Education Center. 
Alpha Omega Fellowship...! to 10 
p.m., tomorrow, Room 227, Academic 
Center. 

Sigma Pi Omega. ..4 to 5 p.m., this 
Wednesday, Oct. 17, Room 107B, 
Lifelong Education Center. 
Student Government Association 
(SGA)...6 p.m., tomorrow. Room 
205A, Learning Resources Center. 



Forum to hold evening meet; 
membership efforts increased 



In an effort lo increase membership 
by providing more convenient hours to 
meet, the Women's Forum has planned 
an evening coffee for Monday, Nov. 5, 
from 6:30 to 9 p.m. in the new student 
restaurant in the Lifelone Education 
Center, according to Ms. Kathryn A. 
Ferrence, career development specialist 
and co-adviser of the organization. 

The idea was conceived during a 
planning session last Wednesday for the 
annually-held Women's Week. 

So far, Ihe planning session and the 
regular meetings with the forum have 
been held during the day at noon and 
have received low attendance. 
However, Ms. Ferrence noted that peo- 



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win a hall sub 
plus medium drink 

r Winners 
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pie have approached her concerning 
their interest in joining the group, but 
due to schedules, could not attend the 
formerly-held meetings. 

Other subjects discussed during last 
week's "brainstorming session" includ- 
ed ideas for the Women's Week 
events.which will be held in March or 
April of next year. 

The women discussed holding an 
art exhibit, a program on ethnic art, 
quillers from Sullivan County, and 
coordinating an art program with a 
Lycoming College professor. 

The tentative theme for the 
Women's Week events is "Women in 
the Arts". 

Ms. Ferrence also noted that she 
and Mrs. Veronica M. Muzic, acting 
division director of integrated studies, 
English professor and co-adviser of the 
forum, will be "talking with people" 
who attend various college events, and 
will be distributing forum information 
to generate interest in the organization. 

For those interested in more infor- 
mation about the group, Ms. Ferrence 
may be contacted at the Career 
Counseling Office in the Learning 
Resources Center, Ext. 398. 

PART-TIME REPORTER ANCHOR 
WLYC-WILQ 

353 Pint Street 

Applications can be picked up from 9-5 

Qualifications: Musi have a good 

speaking voice and command of Ihe 

English language. 




Ken Weslerfield, winner of the 
1982-83 Canadian Frlsbee title, 
demonstrates bis frlsbee skill last Tues- 
day in front of (he Academic Center. 

SPOTLIGHT Photo by Gisela D. 
Grassley. 



BLOODMOBILE 
COMING SOON 



WILL YOU LEND... 
AN ARM? 



LEARN WHILE YOU EARN 


Teach Skin Care and Color Analysis 


Pari-iimc »r lull-iimc 


As m.iin or as feu hrairs as vim si.sh 


Call 326-O.W2 Alio 5 p.m. 



BENSON 



€MMn mini, ^ 
§9Mn market 



Corner of Srd and Mayncrd sts. 



Always Open: 
All Night 
Sundays 
and Holidays 




A/ier ^itidiing hard /or 
a lesi, why not stop b\ 
and pick up a snack? 



llllllllllUlllltllllllllllllllliilllllHllllll I 



* SPECIAL EDITION * 

^Spdiught 



Toesdiy, October 16, 1984 ' 
WilHamsport Am Commality College 



Special Edition 
' Williimsport, Pi. 17701 



Both 

the College 

and 

its students 

need quick 

answer 

We urge 
commissioners 
to approve 
sponsorship 

SPOTLIGHT commentary 



"Dire straits" could be a fair term to currently 
describe the Williamsport Area Community College, 
which now is embroiled in the center of a sponsorship 
controversy which must be solved as soon, and as 
equitably, as possible. 

Almost 20 years ago, 20 school districts from 1 
counties in the state put their approval onto a document 
entitled the Articles of Agreement. In that, each district 
agreed to sponsor the postsecondary students from 
their area to attend the College, pitching in a third of the 
total cost for each student. Attendence In the public 
schools had been going strong. Funding for public 
education was not a crisis. And the agreement, running 
for 20 years, gave a lengthy amount of time to think 
about what to do when it ran out. 

Boards now problem-ridden 

But now, the unanimous, rallying cry from the spon- 
soring school districts boards is to terminate the spon- 
sorship agreement. 

Faced with rising operating and instructing costs, 
declining enrollment, and teachers unions demanding 
higher pay with every new contract, the district leaders 
state that they have enough problems In their own 
backyard, without mulling over approving and ap- 
propriating money for the College's budget. They con- 
tend their first responsibility is to educate those in 
grades kindergarten through 1 2. 

Commissioners now face decision 
^ Now the sponsorship ball is in the Lycoming Coun- 
ty Commissioners' hands -and no one is signing any 
contract. Several weeks have passed since the College 
president initially made his plea lor College sponsorship 
to the commissioners. 

The College, its students, and its supporters, can- 
not wait until July 1 , 1 985, the start of a new fiscal year. 



when the money runs out and the sponsorship agree- 
ment terminates, for a decision about their future to be 
made. They, too - like the government - plan ahead. 

The commissioners also plan ahead, for they now 
are reviewing different departments and their budgets in 
order to bring together a feasable county budget for 
1 985-86. 

We urge the commissioners to quickly take a sup- 
portive stand on the College's proposal, and not to wait 
until the last minute. (Consider when the last vote need- 
ed from the districts for approval of the College's revis- 
ed budget for this year was given: three days prior to the 
new fiscal year. This stressful situation left many 
students, staff, and others in "dire straits" as to planning 
their lives around the College.) 

Support county sponsorship 

We do not believe that it is right for this institution - 
which provides many services to the area, such as jobs, 
job training, continuing education programs for in- 
dividuals and industries, and a noteworthy impetus for 
the local economy - to be halted from providing low- 
cost education while it is forced to stand back and wait 
for someone to pick up sponsorship. The College is a 
professional institution; changes at the College affect 
thousands of people. 

Therefore, the commissioners should remember 
that their decision will not be a "vacuum" one that only 
affects the administration of the College, but that it will 
be a general decision which will cause changes for 
county residents, industries, projects, and taxes 

We urge the county commissioners to become in- 
terim sponsors of the College for the next three to five 
years. 

We also urge students to express their views on 
this issue, which directly affects their future - to write or 
phone the commissioners and state their opinion. 



SPOTLIGHT commentary 

Two community forums on the sponsorship issue are to be held 
tonight and tomorrow night at 7 p.m. in the Academic Center 
Auditorium. 

Dr. Robert L. Breuder, College president, will make opening 
remarks. Then he will take questions from the floor. 

These forums are open to anyone - residents, students, or news 
people - who wish to learn more about the sponsorship issue. 

It is important for the students of the College to understand the 
issues that face our College. 

Students are urged not only to attend the forums, but also to give 
productive input and ask questions relevant to the Issue. 



Sponsorship is topic 
of community forums 
tonigfit and tomorrow 



Take a serious look at the facts 
and help preserve one of Lycoming 
County's most important resources 
-the College. 

29 percent of all College 
graduates seeking employment obtain 
their first job in Lycoming County and 
contribute $1 6.2 million annually to the 
local economy. 

Only 8.5 cents of every College 
dollar comes from Lycoming County 
taxpayers. 

3900 percent is the annual return 
on taxpayer investment in the College. 



County sponsorship: a better alternative 



95 percent of the College's 
graduates who entered the job market 
since 1971 have found employment. 

20,000 students attend the Col- 
lege annually. 

$6,000,000 in financial aid is 
awarded to College students. 

$52,000,000 is the annual 
economic impact of the College on 
Lycoming County, according to projec- 
tions from a study conducted by the 
Pennsylvania Economy League. 

Only 1 .4 percent of the $22.6 
million in College construction and 



renovation completed since 1977 was 
paid by county taxpayers. 

31.5 percent of the College's 
students come from households with 
annual incomes under $15,000. 

63 Lycoming County community 
service projects (e.g., Hiawatha, Indian 
Park) have been successfully under- 
taken by College students since 1982. 

1606 employees from 11 area 
businesses and industries participated 
in specialized training programs of- 
fered at the College since 1983. 

Only 2.3 percent of the 



$5,000,000 expended for instructional 
equipment in the past three years at 
the College has come from county tax- 
payers. 

$4.50 per student is paid by the 
Commonwealth to state-owned univer- 
sities for each $1 received by the Col- 
lege. 

Only 16.45 percent of the 
College's total operating budget 
presently comes from the 20 sponsor- 
ing school districts. 

61 percent of all sponsored 
students come from Lycoming County 



ZdSPOTUGHTDTqmiUt, Oclobtr 16. 19S4 

Sponsorship Issue Updated 



.County, state or school districts:, 
'who will take over sponsorship? 



On July 1 1965, articles of agreement were signed, binding this College with 
19 area school districts (the 20th was added in 1977). Being a 20-year agreement, it 
comes to a close on the first of July 1985. 

Now that the agreement has nearly expired, the school distncts involved have 
decided it is in their best interests to remove themselves from any further respon- 
sibility 



The districU cite a primary responsibility to grades K-12, and look at this Col- 
lege as grades 13 and 14. . u «-• i 

With this in mind, the College created an Agreement to Terminate the Articles 
of Agreement of Sponsorship. 

The termination agreement made several points. Among them are: 

- The school districts' sponsorship obligation ceases as of July 1, 1985. 

- There is a reaffirmed commitment to secondary vocational opportunities for 
any school willing to pay for the service. 

- Former sponsoring districts with residents from outside Lycoming County 
shall continue to pay the sponsor's share of costs for the 1985-86 fiscal year on 
behalf of students enrolled but not graduated in 1984-85. 

Conditions mnsl be met 
Two conditions must be met or the agreement would not be valid. The first is 
that a sponsor other than the school districts involved be obtained as a College 
sponsor. The second is the Pennsylvania Stale Board of Education must approve 
the termination of sponsorship of the College by the school districts. 

Lycoming County was asked to pick up sponsorship of the College when the 
20-year agreement ends. The proposal was released Sept. 4 during a press con- 
ference for media representatives. 

It was pointed out that the long-term goal of the College is state sponsorship, 
with Lycoming County being an interim sponsor. 

No referemdum for voters 
The county commissioners, after much input from the public, have decided not 
to place this issue before the voters in the form of a referendum (a legislative 
measure referred to voters for approval or rejection). 

Lt. Gov. William W. Scranton 3rd, who was at the College last week, was 
reported to have said that the slate might help, but later local press reports noted 
thai the state has no secret bailout plan for the College if the county does not pick 
up the sponsorship, contrary to what some readers inferred from the local news 
stories iaH week. No bailout plan 

Within the past weekend, the lieutenant governor's press secretary, John Baer, 
was quoted in the Sunday GRIT, "...as to a specific plan to bail out 
W.A.C.C....that does not exist. Whether there will by any immediate changes in 
the funding arrangement, there won't be." 

Baer also noted that the legislature is aware of the problems the College is hav- 
ing, and is interested in pursuing proposals that could lead to the establishment of a 
different funding arrangement. 

However, the same newspaper reported that Williamsport Area School Board 
President Richard F. Eberhart was told by Alvin C. Bush, whose candidacy for the 
General Assembly Scranton recently plugged, noted that it could take up to five 
years for the state to resolve the problems of community college funding. 

David A. Atkinson, executive assistant to Senate majority leader Robert C. 
Jubelirer was quoted in the local press: "no special aid is forthcoming in monetary 
terms". Atkinson also noted that if a funding crisis developed, the state would have 
to resort to its persuasive powers in an attempt to resolve the situation. 
Financial arrangemenls studied 
Also in weekend reports, Tim W. Potts, deputy press secretary for the state 
Department of Education noted that the Governor's Commission of Higher Educa- 
tion is studying the financial arrangemenls of the state's 14 community colleges and 
will issue a report and recommendations in November. It is unlikely that apy 
changes in the system will be made this year. 

Dr. Elwood A. Shoemaker, executive director of the state Commission on 
Community Colleges, is reported to have sent a letter 1 1 days ago to the county 
commissioners, expressing his support for county sponsorship of the College, in 
view of lack of state funding. He stated in his letter, according to published reports, 
thai even if the state approved new funding, state law would still require a local 
sponsor. 

Law must be changed 
Therefore, the overall issue cannot be completely resolved by state funding 
alone, unless the law itself is changed. 

According to Dr. Robert Kirkwood, executive director of Middle States 
Association of Colleges and Schools, all of Pennsylvania's 14 community colleges 
are in some kind of difficult financial situation. Among the top of the list are The 
Williamsport Area Community College and the Beaver County Community Col- 
lege. 

The importance of the Middle States Association is that it accredits pubUc 
school, four-year universities and community colleges. Failure to meet the associa- 
tion's standards will result in a loss of accreditation and an immediate cutoff of all 



federal assistance to an institution. It jeopardizes the acceptability of transfer 
credits from that institution and lowers an institution's prestige. 
AssocialioD warm College 

The College has been warned by the Middle States Association to provide a 
long-range funding plan by April 1. 1986. 

Kirkwood is quoted as saying, "Williamsport and Beaver are in very serious 
circumstances, but all community colleges will have problems within five years. 
They have never received the support they were intended to have. 

The Middle States Association recently deferred accreditation of Beaver Coun- 
ty Community College because of underfunding. 

Currently, 20 school districts sponsor the College, with each paying one-third 
the cost of the students from their districts. 

The students themselves also pay one-third and the state pays one-third. 
Enrollees from non-sponsor districts pay two-thirds and the slate one-third. Out-of- 
state students pay the entire cost. 

Education expensive 

Overall, the College and other Pennsylvania community colleges pay more for 
their education than community colleges in every other state except Vermont. Penn- 
sylvania now ranks fifth from the bottom in total outlays pledged to community 
coUcscs . 

Before the process of cutting ftinding from school districts can be completed, 
the College must find a new sponsor. The College proposes that the county take 
over sponsorship next July 1, using taxpayer dollars now going to the distncts, as 
well as new dollars from two current non-sponsoring districts in Lycommg County 
- Loyalsock Township and Muncy. 

The impact of the new arrangement would vary from district to distnct. 

The College maintains that the countywide impact would be minimal. 

According to most recent press reports, the majority of the Lycoming County 
commissioners maintain that school district sponsorship is the most advantageous 
solution. Commissioner Lora P. Morningstar noted: the school district 
superintendents have the educational background necessary to act immediately on 
College issues; the commissioners don't. 

Three commissioners to deal with 

Commissioner Gene E. Smith has been quoted as saying that Dr. Robert L. 
Breuder, College president, supports county sponsorship because he would only 
have to deal with three commissioners instead of the 20 superintendents from the 
school districts. 

However, Smith also noted that Dr. Breuder would come across the same 
obstacles with county sponsorship since any proposals would have to face review by 
15 county-appointed College trustees in addition to the commissioners. 

Commissioner Dolly Will has been quoted as saying that the public should 
realize that county sponsorship is not the only alternative faced by the College. 

With Morningstar and Wilt against Smith's idea for a May referendum on the 
issue, the commissioners have indicated that a vote will probably come within the 
next few weeks. 

SGA information session will focus on sports cut 



Rodney G. Huriey, dean of educa- 
tional research, planning, and evalua- 
tion, and Harry C. Specht, assistant 
professor, physical education, will be in 
attendance at 1he Student Government 
Association (SGA) meeting this evening 
for an information session regarding in- 
tercollegiate sports and the College ac- 
tivities budget. 

The meeting, set for 6 p.m., in 
Room 205A of the Learning Resources 



Center, will be for SGA members and 
any other interested students wishing to 
attend, said Mrs. JoAnn R. Fremiotti, 
coordinator of intramural athletics and 
College activities. 

Dean Hurley and Specht will be 
available to share information, answer 
questions, and participate in the discus- 
sion to be held about the CoUege's pro- 
posal to terminate funding for the inter- 
collegiate athletics program. 



SPOTLIGHT 
Tuesday, Oct. 16. 1984 ■ Vol. 20, No. 9 

The SPOTLIGHT is published each Monday morning of the academic year, ex- 
cept for College vacations, by journalism and other interested students of The 
Williamsport Area Community College 

Office; Room 7, Academic Center, 1006 W. Third St., Williamsport, Pa. 
17701 Telephone; (717) 326-3761, Extension 221. 



THE STAFF 
Donna M. Barnett, Managing Editor; Karen M. fuletarko. Editorial Page Editor; 
Gisela D. Grassley, Photography Editor; Mark S. Schwanke, Administrative Affairs 
Editor; James K. Morrissey, Student Affairs Editor; Kathryn M. Gilbert, Advertising 
Manager: Rodney D. Hill, Sporfs £t*(or, Richard E Kopp Jr., Senior Staff Writer. 

BEPORTERS/STAFF ASSOCIATES 

Wanna F. Brown, Ivlelanie S Callahan, Kathleen L. Eisert, George I. Hawk, 
Robert W fvlinier, Anne T N/loratelli, Donald E. f^umlord, Sandra L. Musgrave, 
Judith L Swinehart, Sandra R Taylor, James E. Treese, Jennifer S. White, LeRoy 
S. Whitmire Jr , Canda IVI Zinck 

Faculty adviser; Anthony N Cillo. 



ProducUon Staff This Issue 

Karen M. Metarko, Donna M Barnett, Rodney D. Hill, Gisela D Grassley, 
Richard E Kopp Jr , Ivlark S. Schwanke 



S potlight 

Mondi;, Ocl. 22, 1984 • Vol. 20, No. JT^ I Pipi 
Williimiiwrt Arei CommoBll; CoUcft • Wimnniport, Pi. 17711 




LARGE CROWD gathered in the Bardo Gym last Monday night for Col- 
lege Night. Over 80 colleges and universities had representatives available 
to talk to high school and College students about entering and transferr- 
ing to their institutions. [SPOTLIGHT photo by Richard E. Kopp Jr.] 

College donations near goal, 
may *go over the top' 

With less than one week to go, the 
College's 1984-1985 Lycoming United 
Way campaign as of last week was 
$1,382 short of going 'over the top', 
according to William C. Bradshaw, 
director of experiential learning and 
College coordinator for the United 
Way campaign. 



As of last Wednesday, 191 facul- 
ty and staff had contributed a total of 
$7,114. That meant, he said, that 44 
percent of the persons working at the 
College have met 84 percent of the 
$8,500 goal. 

Bradshaw cited the 39 General 



Services staff members for their con- 
tributions and also noted that seven 
faculty in the Transportation 
Technology Division have contributed 
an average of over $111 each. 

Lacking just one person to have 
100 percent unit contributions are the 
Counseling, Career Development, and 
Placement Office, the Bookstore, the 
Media Center, the Library, and the 
Developmental Studies and Library 
group, he said. 

"With a few days left in the cam- 
paign, I'm sure many of those 245 
employees who have not contributed 
will come through," Bradshaw 
commented. 



Two Warrior Run graduates 
first to receive scholarships 



{Courtesy College Information Office] 
Two Warrior Run High School 
graduates have been chosen as the 
first recipients of the Ralph L. Smith 
Memorial Scholarship. 

Renee Blakeney, of Turbotville 
RD 1, an engineering drafting 
technology student, and Shelley 
Schwenk, of Muncy RD 3, a secretarial 
science student, have each been 
credited $450 toward their Spring 
1985 tuition account at the College. 
In 1983, Mrs. Josephine Smith, of 
28 Main St., Watsontown, donated 
$10,000 to the College to establish a 
scholarship account in the memory of 
her late husband, Ralph L. Smith. The 
monies have been invested by the 



Williamsport Area Community Col- 
lege Foundation Inc. and interest in- 
come is being used to make the annual 
awards. A total of $900 will be given 
each year. 

According to Mrs. Smith's wishes, 
students receiving the scholarship 
monies are first-year Williamsport 
Area Community College students 
from the Warrior Run School District. 

Selection was made by the War- 
rior Run High School on the basis of 
scholastic achievement, dedication, 
leadership, financial need, and other 

similar qualities. 



Commissioners say no 
to sponsorship; Trustees 
detail actions to be taken 



Late report 

The Lycoming County Commis- 
sioners have voted against county 
sponsorship of the College by a 3 to 
decision. The decision came last Thurs- 
day with the commissioners Con- 
cluding that they lack the expertise to 
deal with the College's problems. 

On Friday, at a press conference. 
Dr. Robert L. Breuder, College presi- 
dent, stated that he was caught by sur- 
prise by the commissioners' timing and 
that he and the College Board of 
Trustees were disappointed vrith the 
decision. 

The trustees met in an executive 
session last Thursday evening and 
took action on the following points, the 
press was told during the conference: 

- Dr. Breuder is to make a report 
to the State secretary of education 
concerning the College dilemma. 

~ Dr. Breuder is to meet with the 
20 school district superintendents in- 
volved with sponsorship to conduct a 
re-examination of the respective 
school boards' positions. 

- The College Board of Trustees 
desires a renegotiation of the sponsor- 
ship agreement. To have the oppor- 
tunity for renegotiation, the College 
needs a two thirds vote, or 14 of the 
20 districts involved. 

- The president is also to estabUsh 
a fact-finding commission, comprised 
of area business and community 
leaders, for the purpose of examining 
the College's state of affairs and to 
recommend their findings to the 
trustees. 

Dr. Breuder also noted that the 
trustees relayed that they will do all 
they can within their legal authority to 
ensure that the College will remain 
open and operating beyond July 30, 
1985 (the expiration date of the ar- 
ticles of agreement with the 20 spon- 
soring school districts). 

Following the president's informa- 
tion about the decisions from Thursday 
night's executive meeting of the 
trustees, he added that he will be 
periodically be meeting with the 
trustees in order to update the Col- 
lege's sponsorship matter. 

In a question and answer session 



Daylight Saving Time Ends Sunday: 
...Spring ahead... Fall back 



following Dr. Breuder's remarks, he 
commented that he did not believe that 
there are a majority numlfer of spon- 
soring districts willing to 
renegotiate the present agreement. 
He added that there is evidence that 
only one board has expressed interest 
in reconsidering. 

Dr. Breuder stated that the 
trustees want to begin renegotiation 
as soon as after Jan. 1, assuming that 
interest is indicated by a majority of 
the school districts. 

The trustees noted that the Col- 
lege administration is to continue with 
the preparations of the College's 
1985-1986 budget and deliver the 
document to the sponsoring school 
districts. 

Dr. Breuder noted that he felt that 
the commissioners were "still cloudy" 
on several of the issues and did not 
have a clear understanding of the pro- 
posed partnership. 

He said he felt that if the commis- 
sioners would have delayed their deci- 
sion to the week of Oct. 22, the spon- 
sorship proposal might have had a 
chance. 

Dr. Breuder expljiined that he had 
requested a meeting for that week 
with the commissioners to clarify some 
issues and to discuss the draft docu- 
ment which included two major points: 

"That the commissioners would 
not be saddled with any amount of 
long-term indebtedness to the College, 
and 

-That the total amount of ex- 
penses for the county would not ex- 
ceed a 1.5 mill real estate tax increase 
for the county. 

Asked what was going to happen 
to the College in the long term, Dr. 
Breuder replied, "There's no clear 
definition of what's going to happen. 
The situation is filled v/ith 'ifs' because 
we [the College] are in unchartered 
waters. This situation has never hap- 
pened before in the state. 

Dr. Breuder went on to say that 
the state never completely defined the 
limits of a local sponsor. It was not 
made clear if the College can be spon- 
sored by just one county, or other 
counties, or a small number of school 
districts. 

With no evidence of the school 
districts considering a re-position and 
with the county's opposition vote on 
spsonsorship. the president's comment 
to media representatives on the future 
of the College was: "We'll have to wait 
and see". 



ZaSPOrUGHTDMoBday, Oclobtr 22, 1984 



Voters disregard 'guesswork' 



The very idea that the media in- 
fluences the final outcome of elections 
by predicting winners, thus "brain- 
washing" people to vote a certain way 
or not at all. is an insult to the in- 
telligence of Ihe American voter. 



Letters to readers 



SPOTLIGHT off-campus com- 
mentary on media; and ques- 



Anyone over f8 years of age has tion of their Influence on 
learned - or is learning - not to believe yoters In national elections 

everything they see, read, or hear. This 
iricludes predictions of election win- 
ners by the media prior to or during the 
vote-counting process. No matter what 
you call it, a projection or prediction is 
merely a GUESS. 

Current opinion polls indicate President Ronald Reagan leading Walter F. 
Mondale by a substantial margin. Does this mean there should be no election on 
November 6 because everyone knows who the winner is now? Of course not. 
Once a person is inside a voting booth, the decision who to vole for is up to him 
and nobody else. Blaming Ihe media for the outcome of elections underestimates 
the ability of people to choose for themselves. 



Family movie lias a message 



By Wanna F. Brown 
01 the SPOTLIGHT staff 

"The Prodigal" Is a movie that has 
a message for all ages. The movie is a 
dramatic, true-to-lite story, telling of a 
family's hardships, trials and victories, 
and depicts how the family had closed 
the doors on each other, and thrown 
away the key. 

The film Is well worth the money 
to see, and is a refreshing movie that is 
unlike the stream of typical teen idol 
movies that Hollywood has been 
streaming out. 

The stars, John Hammond, Hope 



Lange and John Cullum, played their 
roles with great believabllity, aided by 
a special appearance by Billy Graham 
as well as a well-written script by 
James F. Collier, 

Editorial Notice 

The SPOTLIGHT editorial page 
editor encourages readers, Including 
College students, faculty, and staff, to 
submit their poems, political carloons, 
and other artwork to the SPOTLIGHT 
office. 

Deadline for the materials to be 
submitted is by noon, the Tuesday 
before the next date of publication. 



President urges 
donations to ease 
local blood shortage 

The Williamsport Area Communi- 
ty College is hosting a College-wide 
blood drive sponsored by the Student 
Government Association and Lycom- 
ing County Chapter of the American 
Red Cross. 

We had a successful blood drive at 
the Natural Resources Management 
Center on Oct. 11 and hope for the 
same success at the drive to be held 
Oct. 30 and 31 at the Main Campus. 
You are probably aware of the 
local blood shortage. There is a specific 
need for all negative blood types ~ 
especially A and B negative. 

Blood cannot be stored for long 
periods of time; thus, the need is con- 
stant. The elderly, cancer victims, 
open heart surgery patients, and acci- 
dent victims are the four areas which 
require the greatest amount of blood. 
I urge each member of the College 
community to donate one hour (or less) 
of your time and a pint of blood to help 
solve the local shortage. 

This is the opportunity for us to 
give of ourselves to the benefit of 
others. Your blood may save the life 
of someone you love! 

Dr. Robert L. Breuder 
College president 



Don't cut sports 

If the athletic program at the Col- 
lege is dropped, everyone will suffer. 
The College administration will be 
held responsible in the eyes of the 
athletes. So to speak, they will be the 
people who pull the switch on the 
"electric chair", killing the College's 
intercollegiate sports program. 

Every school must represent itself 
athletically. Athletes instill a sense of 
pride in the student body. They also 
give everyone a chance to excel in 
their sport. 

The College has offered its 
students a chance to continue athletics 
after high school. I believe that it is 
essential to offer physical competition 
in order for a person to reach his 
highest potential. 

I do not beheve that sports in a col- 
lege should be considered a privilege; 
instead, it is the students' right to 
compete. 

Instead of being a pessimist and 
saying, "Our sports program is down, 
let's drop it all together, and no one 
will notice," the administration should 
be saying, "Okay, sports are lacking 
enthusiasm here. Let's promote our 
programs and get the students ex- 
cited." 

And for heaven's sake, get the 
wrestling back on the sports schedule. 
Harry C. Specht, coordinator of inter- 
collegiate athletics, stated that par- 
ticipation in that program was 
excellent. 

Well, isn't that what you want? 

Lear Engel 

general studies student 

from Williamsport RD 3 



Whaddya' say... ? 



Do you feel that inter- 
collegiate sports should be re- 
tained at the College? Why or 
why not? 

Photos by Rodney D. Hill 

Text by Jennifer S. White 

Both of the SPOTLIGHT staff 






.^^mU^ 1 


.-1 '" 


^ 


1 



"Yes. You need something besides 
studies." - Luke C. Hittner, machinist 
general student from Palmertown. 



"Yes. I was going to wrestle, but "Yes. It's good for competition 

the sport was dropped." - Darrin J. ^^'^ improvement of the individuals." 
Gennocro, electronic technology stu- " J^*" ^- Lantz, carpentry and 
dent from Cameron County. building construction student from 

Ulster. 






"Yes. It's a good activity. Some ,.„ i, ^,. u , , „ 

people like the sports and are in- ,,., Yes^I rn on the basketball team, 

terested." - Ricky J. Ardell, elec- ' '^ff'^- Without them, there's not 

tronics technology student from '""''' f '*"■, T i^^^ ^- ^alasco, 

Williamsport carpenty and building construction 

,....................,..'... ... ... student from Altoona. 

The SPOTUGHT Is published each Monday 
momino of the academic year, excepl lor Coi 
lege yacations, by loumailsm and oilier In- 

» '°?,^°i'll"'^"" °' '"" Wlliamsport Af ea Com- 
munity Colleoe 



V\«^ 



"Yes. Competitive sports are good 
for the students. It gives them "Yes. It's good to have competi- 

something to work for." - Tami L. '-'°" ^"d it's a chance to meet other 

Beminger, general studies student people." - Stacy D. PoweD, accounting 

from Williamsport. student from Jersey Shore. 



w °T^?t ^°°" '■ *=a'l«"ilc Center, 1005 
W- Third SI. Wllilamsport, Pa 17701 
Telephone: (717| 328-3761, Extension 221 



Opinions expressed are those of the student 
newspaper or ol those whose names accorti- 
pany Items. Opinions do not rellect official opi- 
nion of the institution. 



n , ^1^ SPOTLIGHT Is „ .tracer 
Columbia Scholastic Press Association, 



memtier of ttie 



Film available 
to instructors 



A Red Cross film is available to 
any instructor who would be in- 
terested in showing the film to his or 
her class for promotional purposes, ac- 
cording to Mrs. Janet R. Querimit, 
R.N., College nurse. 

The film is about a boy who is 
stricken with leukemia, but because of 
the Red Cross Bloodmobile donations, 
he is able to do things such as play 
soccer. 

The film is approximately 15 
minutes long. It may be checked out 
by instructors by calling Ext. 224, said 
Mrs. Querimit. 



Catering class 
winery tour 
tomorrow 



SPOTLIGBTDMonda;. October 22, 1984d3 



In order to learn to recognize 
wines and how they are made, the 
catering and beverage management 
class will be taking a trip to Wagner 
Wineries in Lodi, N.Y.. tomorrow, ac- 
cording to Mrs. Ann R. Miglio, assis- 
tant professor of food and hospitality. 

From there, the students will 
travel to Pierce's Winery, Elmira, 
N.Y., to tour the wine cellers and eat 
dinner in the adjoining restaurant. 

"The students are really looking 
forward to the trip," commented Mrs. 
Miglio. 

. Restaurant well received, 

Catering class reservations now needed 

Due to the fact that Monday night 
dinners in the student-operated 
restaurant have been well received, 
reservations now are definitely re- 
quired, according to Mrs. Ann R. 
Miglio, assistant professor of food and 
hospitality. 

"We can only cook for so many... 
plus, there is a limited seating capaci- 
ty," Mrs. Miglio said. She added that 
when a reservation is made, a table is 
assured. 

Reservations may be made by 
telephoning Ext. 369 or 244. 

Currently, plans are in effect for 
Monday, Wednesday, and Thursday 
evening meals to be served next 
semester. Under the direction of Mrs. 
Miglio and Howard Mihan, foods in- 
structor, the quantity production class 
will be serving the meals. 

"We really appreciate the 
patronage from the students, faculty, 
and staff," commented Mrs. Miglio. 



is successful 
says professor 

With a consistent schedule, the 
catering class is busy completing 
varied events, according to Mrs. Ann 
R. Miglio, assistant professor of food 
and hospitality. 

To date, she said, the caterers 
have worked on a retirement dinner 
for a College faculty member and on 
an "after-theater" reception. 

In addition, Mrs. Miglio noted that 
the catering class has completed "off 
premises" events such as a wedding, 
a christening, and a variety of 
receptions. 

"We try to get involved in those 
events which the students would be 
likely to do on their own," she 
commented. 

Mrs. Miglio explained that the 
caterers offer a sit-down dinner, buf- 
fet, or whatever is desired. Various 
menues are offered and the clients 
select from them, she said. 

"We are booked with catering 
events up to the Spring Semester," 
she said, adding, "We are already look- 
ing toward next year." _ 

TYPING FOR STUDENTS 
Will type reports, term papers, etc. 
60 cents per page-double spaced 
90 cents per page-single spaced 
Call: 323-8488 

mmKmmiiiimmmmmmmmmmw 



ACROSS 


city 




3 One who 


1 Algonqulan 


shows 


4 Head of 


pronoise 


monastery 


4 Refrain (from) 


9 Slender 


5 Exist 


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12 Bother 


amount 


13 Light brown 


7 Monster 


14 Deface 


8 Rips 


15 Lanterns 


9 Large bird 


17 Vilify 


10 Moccasin 


19 Consumes 


11 Anger 


21 Transgress 


16 Actor's goal 


22 Tell 


18 Attract 



25 More secure 20 Sttarpen 

29 One of the 22 Brazilian port 
Smiths 23 By oneself 

30 Radials 24 Weird 

32 Existed 26 Tip of yore 

33 Busily clump 27 Mistake 




35 Bridge 
position 

37 Before 

38 Dye plant 
40 Devout 

42 Gl green 

43 Lawful 
45 Makes 

beloved 
47 Golf mound 

49 Colorful 
cheese 

50 Callings 
54 Andean 

animal 

57 Time gone by 

58 Wash lightly 

60 Electrified 
particle 

61 Morning 
moisture 

62 Junctures 

63 Negative 

DOWN 

1 Maglie of 
baseball 

2 Oklahoma 



28 Musical 

instruments 
31 Rock 
34 Excavate 
36 Football 

groupings 



39 Tardy manly one 

41 Arctic 51 Mature 

swimmer 52 Quarrel 

44 Condescend- 53 Nahoor 

ing looks sheep 

46 With force 55 Farmyard cry 
48 Pennsylvania 56 Social Insect 

port 59 Samarium 

50 Ungentle- symbol 



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Computer demonstration set for Thursday jsjew non-credit 

A computer demonstration will be ing, and about UNIX. 

"This demonstration is open to all 
staff, faculty, and students," said Carl 
L. Christiansen, director of computer 
services. He said visitors may "come 
in at their own convenience". 



given from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. this 
Thursday in Room 210, Lifelong 
Education Center. 

The presentation will be given by 
Paul Sturm and Chuck Featerstone, of 
AT&T, and will include the PC6300 
and 3B2 computers. Sturm will be 
available to demonstrate those com- 
puters as well as to answer questions 
about the equipment, about network- 



BENSON 



OfH minL ^ 
fBntJnarket 



Corner of 3rd and Mcynard Sts. 



courses to begin 
at end of this month 

Brochures have been mailed from 
the Center for Lifelong Education to 
■ announce new courses in the campus- 

Alan W. Buck among new based and community-based pro- 
Staff at College this year grams, according to Mrs. Carol Kaufj 

Alan W. Buck has joined the staff — '— - - 

in the College Library, according to 
Mrs. Kate D. Hickey, librarian. 

Buck has worked in libraries 
previously. 

He was awarded a master's 
degree in education from Mansfield 
University. 

Mrs. Hickey said Buck will be the 
reference assistant and will be able to 
help students during weekends and in 
evenings. 



Always Open: 
All Night 
Sundays 
and Holidays 




After slutiyitig hard /or 
a test. H*r nol slop b\ 
an(t pick up a snack? 



coordinator of campus-based 
programs. 

Classes will begin Oct. 29 and run 
until Dec. 20. 

There are 49 courses offered in the 
campus-based program. New courses 
include Effective Communication, Silk 
and Dried Holiday Decorations, How 
to Cross-Stitch for Christmas, 
Astronomy, History of French 
Civilization, and Conversational 
French for Children. 

Popular courses with the students 
in the past, she said, include Changing 
Careers, Computer Literacy, Com 
The City of Williamsport has jj^^j^ q,^^_ Stained Glass I, Mix- 
posted Susquehanna Street from ^i^gy Pattern Fitting, and Hatha 



Watch where you park! 



Yoga. 



Third Street south to the railroad 

tracks on both sides, according to q^ campus, brochures are 

Lawrence P. Smeak, supervisor of available to be picked up at the 

security. Academic Center offices of the Center 

In all probability, the ^^^ Lifelong Education. 

Williamsport city police will issue ^^__^__^^___^^-=^^=^ 

tickets for vehicles parked in this $7,200,000 is spent annually in 

area, Smeak said. Lycoming County by students from 

>QQOOQBOoe outside the county. 



4aSPOTLIGHTDMoiid<y. Ocl. 22, 1984 




The Sidelines 



Sports Cammenlary 

By Rodney D. HUl 

SPOTLIGHT Sports Editor 



IM«../4«AMn/MM«lt/rM I UU*lti*»AIIUh.\IUf<'Nt.li. 




W.A.C.C. Five-0 takes top 
position in bowling competition 



Ideas of a complete college would 
have to include an intercollegiate 
sports program even if the college is 
a community college. 

Granted, the primary and most im- 
portant purpose of a college is for 
education and to, hopefully, pursue 
some sort ot career. 

Our own college appears to be 
ready to eliminate intercollegiate 
sports for 1985 in favor of providing 
more College activities and intramural 
events for a greater amount of 
students. 

Intercollegiate sports. College ac- 
tivities, and intramural sports are 
funded with that $1.25 per semester 
credit hour that we pay in addition to 
our tuition. 

Some of the plans are to build 
more outdoor facilities for intramural 
events and to sponsor additional Col- 
lege activities such as ballet, opera, 
and rock concerts. 

Now, when you talk about events 
benefitting just a small amount of the 
school population, try to hold ballet 
and opera at a predominantly-technical 
college... and look at the numbers. It 
will probably cost a fair amount of 



of all, an athlete is not restricted to 
winning over the .same people time 
after time. The level of competition 
changes from one contest to the next 
and it increases the skill that nears 
perfection each time of the scheduled 
contests. 

If our College had team sports, we 
would probably get more participants 
and spectators. One of our sports is 
basketball which draws about 80 to 
100 people - and that is about par for 
an institution such as the College. 

It is very unlikely that those who 
made this decision for us were denied 
the opportunity to compete on the in- 
tercollegiate level of sports because 
the program was not available. 

Generally speaking, most of the 
students who attend community col- 
leges do not have the high financial 
background that students of four-year 
schools have. Community college 
students with less funds for education, 
or those students who wish to pursue 
an education in the technical fields, are 
still people who have the desire and 
ability to compete on the inter- 
collegiate level. 

A decision has been made to delete 



W.A.C.C. Five-0 has taken over 
sole position of first place after We 
Three, which has been leading in bowl- 
ing team standings went to second, ac- 
cording to ABC Lanes reports. 

Team standings 

The team standings, with the first 
number after the team name represen- 




Men's high single 
1. Mark E. Reamsnyder, 237; 
ting wins and the second number 2. Rudy E. Long, 223; 3. Christopher 
representing losses, are: " ~ 

1. W.A.C.C. Five-0, 9, 3 

2. We Three, 8, 4. 

3. Pin Busters, 8, 4. 

4. Scratch, 7, 5. 

5. The Outlaws, 6, 6. 

6. No. 5, 5, 7. 

7. Dew Crew, 5^7. 

8. No. 8, 0, 12. 

High team series 
1. W.A.C.C. Five-0, 



2. Outlaws, 1869; 3. Pin Busters and 
Scratch, 1751. 

High team single 

1. W.A.C.C. Five-O, 701 
2. Outlaws, 647; 3. No. 5, 611. 
Men's high series 
1. Mark E. Reamsnyder, 617; 



Patrick, 216. 

Women's high series 

1. Denise M. McNeil, 408. 
Women's high single 

1. Denise M. McNeil, 144. 

Top 5 averages 

1. Mark E. Reamsnyder, 197; 

2. [tie] Rudy E. Long and Barry A. 

Boney, 173; 4. Myles S. Murray, 171; 

5. Christopher L. Patrick and Joseph 

1894; D. DeCarii, 161. 



Anyone interested In 
bowling in competition should 
come to the ABC Lanes 1245 
Park Avenue, Williamsport on 



2. Rudy E. Long, 599; 3. Christopher Tuesday at 4 p.m. 

L. Patrick, 537. 

Parfitt sets course record 

Wayne M. Parfitt, an auto body for more than two minutes as the 
student from Pottsville, set a new second-place finisher crossed 

money for an event such as these and the intercollegiate sports program; the Wdaf in^trifn^Ir ^"""'^ 'f' .J" .""'"''/o? o,'\^^'T*" ^'"'''^'"^ 
... ,, , ,, , n 1 1- J t r fi, J • ''aturaay m a triangular cross country with a time of 24:27- Brad ev I Aider 

the outcome would probably be athletic department must have a deci- mppt with Mnnt„„„o.„ p 1„ p„ J „„ „.^„.;„. ...L.V._. . L . ,'"™' 

"predictable". 

Intercollegiate sports are so much 
different than the intramural level for 
a number of reasons. There is unifor- 
mity which motivates participants for 
competition. There is certainly more 
discipline and organization. And, most 



sionbythL'firs;o;N:;:.ZrX:;t z'::'^iTzi^':x:z ^^!«!i^^^!s^-.^'" 



whether or not the program is going 
to be reinstated in order to schedule 
with other teams. 

The only possible way that inter- 
collegiate sports can remain is for a 
large turnout of student input. 



Sports , 
Schedule 



Intramural Sports 

Flag Football 

Monday: Scumbuzzards vs. winner 
"of Mean Moms and Young Invaders, 
5 p.m. 

Tuesday: Game two of Scumbuz- 
zards and the winner in the game bet- 
ween Mean Moms and Young Invaders 
if needed. 

Men's basketball 

Monday; G'town vs. The Freeze, 
7 p.m.; Bums vs. Yuk-a-Roidz, 8 p.m. 

Tuesday: Knights vs. Warriors, 7 
p.m. 

Wednesday: Knights vs. The 
G'town, Warriors vs. The Freeze, 7 
p.m.; Bums vs. Corrosion, Yuk-a-Roidz 
vs. Payton Gang, 8 p.m. 

Thursday: Knights vs. The Freeze, 
Warriors vs. G'town, both games at 7 
p.m.; Bums vs. Payton Gang, Yuk-a- 
Roidz vs. Corrosion, 8 p.m. 



Hulksters vs. X-T, 7 p.m 

Tuesday: Net Busters vs. 
Hulksters, 98-50's vs. X-T, 7 p.m. 

Wednesday: Net Busters vs. X-T; 
98-50's vs. Hulksters, 7 p.m. 

Thursday: Net Busters vs. 98-50's; 
Hulksters vs. X-T, 7 p.m. 

Men's Volleyball 

Monday: Wammers vs. Warriors, 
The Angle Men vs. Purple Rehab, 8 
p.m.; Straub Greenies vs. Red Raiders, 
Hummida Hummidas vs. Scumbuz- 
zards, 8:45 p.m. 

Tuesday, Bums vs. Knights, 
Stringers vs. Snorters, 8 p.m.; Cur- 
ran's Crew vs. Last Minute Pick-Ups 
8:45 p.m. 

Wednesday and Thursday games 
will be the elimination games. 

Intercollegiate 
Sports 

Cross Country 

Saturday: Eastern Pennsylvania 
Collegiate Conference Tournament at 
White Deer Golf Course, 11 a.m 



munity College and Bucks County Tunkhannock, finished fifth with 

Community College. time of 25:51; Warren P. Renninger, 

Although Parfitt did break the a nursery management student from 

course record, the Wildcat runners in Williamsport, crossed in sixth place, 

both men's and women's competition timed at 27:18; Gregory S. Lange, an 

split their team results. accounting student from Lock Haven, 

In men's competition, it was the finished 10th with a 30:12 timing and 

Williamsport Area Community Col- James D. Cramer, an automotive stu- 

lege over Montgomery CCC, 19 to 36, dent from Cleons was 12th, with a 

and Bucks CCC over Williamsport, 25 time of 34:00. 
'° ^2; '" women's competition. Miss 

The women's win came over Kuyper finished the run with a time of 

accounting 



Coed Volleyball 

Monday: Net Busters vs. 98-50's; ^ucks CCC, 15 to 21, and they lost to 24:42; Daria J. Beahm, 



Montgomery CCC, 16 to 20. student from Mill Hall, placed fifth 

Jennifer 0. Kuyper, a retail with a 28:32 timing; Kori M. Jones, a 

management student from Troy, has dietetic technician student from Piiie 

been establishing a name of her own Grove, crossed at 33:06 of the meet in 

in the first women's season. ninth place and Stephanie M. McPeak 

Miss Kuyperfor the third straight a general studies student from Cen- 

meet has finisM first at the end of the tralia, finished 10th with a time of 

run. This meet was no exception - 34:08. 

when she was resting at the finish line 




§ STUDENTS of a morning physical fitness class leam the basic skills of soc- 
cer which seems to be becoming a very popular sport. [SPOTLIGHT photo] 





-. r 



James A. Boyce, civil technology 
student: "1 think if the school goes 
under I'll just transfer out. I came here 
because it's cheaper. You can come 
here and get your main credits and 
you're able to continue. I'll just take 
an early out." 




Clarice L. Fluty: "I don't think it's 
fair for three people to decide the fate 
of the entire College for all of Lycom- 
ing County. I think it should have been 
put on a referendum." 



Reaction to county's 
decision on sponsorship 

On Thursday, shortly 
after the decision by the 
Lycoming County Commis- 
sioners not to sponsor the Col- 
lege became known on cam- 
pus, various persons were ask- 
ed for reactions. 

Photos by Gisela D. Grassley and text by Sandra R. Taylor 



SPOTLICHTDMoDil.,, Ocl. 22, 1984d5 



Jody K. Horn, general studies stu- 
dent: "I think the school districts will 
be forced to sponsor the school 
because of the state's involvement." 





Cynthia M. Perry, broadcasting 
student: "For the past few years, area 
residents have faced declining employ- 
ment. These unemployed persons have 
turned to the College for support. The 
College teaches the unemployed 
necessary skills required to obtain new 
employment. T^an Lycoming County 
afford to lose another $52 million an- 
nually? This is what will happen if the 
county commissioners fail to support 
(the College's] sponsorship for the next 
three to five years." 




Gregory J kother "They should 
support it; the College has saved me. 
It is an asset to the community. I don't 
think the commissioners are 
knowledgeable about the College. 
They just want to wash their hands of 
it." 



Bonnie L. Bower, general studies 
student: "They were worried about 
popular opinion. Since no one showed 
up at the forum to express popular opi- 
nion, it showed the commissioners that 
the city and average person doesn't 
care..." 




Dave E. Davenport Jr., business 
management student: "I don't think 
it's fair... because they're afraid of it 
- and that's a terrible reason. 1 think 
they can find a way if they really try. 
The College has proven that they are 
willing to work along with them. If 
they don't help us out, the commis- 
sioners will be responsible if the Col- 
lege goes down the tubes. They will 
partially be responsible for a lot of kids 
that aren't going to get the education 
that they need. They are going to have 
to make up for it... paying out in 
assistance." 




Robin L. Yeager, LPN and stu- 
dent nurse: "How do the commis- 
sioners expect to get any new business 
in [the county] if they can't educate the 
students? The commissioners are not 
looking out for the younger people in 
their county." 




David W. Bassett, electronics 
technology student: "I don't think the 
commissioners know how tough it is to 
get through college. If you don't have 
a whole lot of money, you're just not 
going to make it." 




Judy L. Brokaw, computer science 
student: "I don't think the commis- 
sioners really took their time and 
thought about it. I think they should 
have talked to Dr. Breuder more. In- 
stead, they were worried more about 
the pressure than [about] sitting down 
and figuring out what's going to be 
done... and what the effects on the sur- 
rounding community would be." 



6DSP0TUCHTDM0Dd«j, Ocl. 11, 1984 



New magazines available 
at College Bookstore 

A stock of new magazines has 
been delivered to the College 
Bookstore, according to Mrs. Eleonore 
R. Holcomb, Bookstore supervisor. 

Between 30 and 35 publications 
arrived last week, she said. 

A variety of magazines include 
Glamour, Vogue, 4-Wheel and Off 
Road, Popular Science, and 
Computers. 

The magazines arrive monthly and 
weekly; they are displayed at the 
Bookstore. 



Le Juene Chef 
menues posted; 
hours listed 

Le Juene Chef, the student- 

^^^m '^^B ^BF -^Hi -' r x^^^^ lit k. n' operated restaurant, is open for lunch 

^K ^^M ^LjtL^BlW^^'^Br :4'^l9Bn^ < ' '^^! ^ from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. every Tuesday, 

^H ^B ■"•■'•-^i <*t.T7l(. » "^^^^ff. f Jn Thursday, and Friday, with the meals 

^H w ^^^^^^^^^^^^ being prepared by students in the 

^t I ^^^^^^^^^^^H ^VMHH P'^^'-secondary and secondary chefs' 

^m ^^BHi^H^^^r ^^^^^1 course. 

^■- ' ^S^^B^^w ^^^^H Featured in the menues are soup, 

special of the day, dessert, and an a la 
carte menu, according to Sue C. Ben- 
net, a food and hospitality student 
from Duboistown and coordinator. 

The restaurant is also open from 

11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. Mondays and 

, . ^. „,.„. _. J » 1 T D 1 1 J- Wednesdays vidth a choice of two en- 

!"tt7ll''"L^r,!^'"^Tr„?.'^«rnTr;r^^T""L^r:r^'''"''"^ trees and with beverage included. 




GLANCING through the new magazines are Elizabeth A. Capkovic, general 



student who also is from Williamsport. [SPOTLIGHT photo] 



College providing nurses' aide training 



Reservations are not required. 
The menu for this week is: 



Courtesy College Information Office 

Ten persons housed at the Muncy 
Stat* Correctional Institution, at Mun- 
cy, are enrolled in a Nurse's Aide 
Training Program developed for the 
institution by the College. 

The Specialized Technical Educa- 

Book sale over 

The Phi Beta Lambda book sale 
is over. Students may pick up the 
books or money if the books have 
been sold, according to Jonathan F. 
Miller, Phi Beta Lambda president. 



tion Office of the community college 
designed the training program for the 
prison and the Development Office 
helped secure the funding. 

Funding is being totally provided 
through the Job Training Partnership 
Act (JTPA), a federally-funded jobs 
training program. 

According to Gra nt Ma rtin, coor- 
dinator of specialized technical educa- 
tion programs at the College, those 
who complete the nurse's aid training 
program will be prepared for an entry- 
level job in a hospital or medical in- 



I^ the perfect relationsh^ 

between (Mie man 
and half the human race. 




$1 (with ID) tonight 7:30 p.m. 
$2 (without ID) ACC Auditorium 



Tuesday, Oct. 23 

stitution as a nurse's aide. The train- Pork chops dijonaise, baked 

ing will be useful to them as they potato, asparagus-herb butter or red 

return to their home areas upon cabbage allemand, dessert, 

parole, he said. Thursday, Oct. 25 

Martin said the Muncy Prison in- Swiss steak with tomatoes, Chan- 
mates enrolled in the course will be in tilly potatoes, buttered carrots or 
the classroom from 12:30 p.m. to 4 French peas, blueberry corn muffins, 
p.m., Monday through l-Yiday until soup-Creole, dessert. 
Dec. 10. In addition to the classroom Friday, Oct. 26 
learning, the students will gain prac- Chicken tetrazzini, Plymouth suc- 
tical experience in practice situations cotash or raised celery hearts, bran 
in a simulated hospital lab. he said, muffins, beef vegetable soup, dessert. 

New Multi-Cultural Society 
has dual purpose: coordinator 



The Multi-Cultural Society was 
declared an official student club at 
the College on Sept. 27 of this year. 

The club's intent or purpose, ac- 
cording to Mrs. JoAnn R. Fremiot- 
ti, coordinator of intramural 
athletics and College activities, is to 
provide practical, social and educa- 
tional opportunities related to the 
concerns and needs of the non- 
traditional College student. 

A non-traditional student is 
defined as one who is handicapped 
in a physical, educational or 
economic sense and/or enrolled less 



than full time. 

Anyone wishing to join the club 
may contact Mrs. Maryann R. Lamp- 
man, instructor of reading, in Room 
159, Learning Resources Center, or 
Miss Linda E. Whaley, secretary to 
the dean of administration, in Room 
203, Lifelong Education Center, or 
telephone College Ext. 307. 

The club also plans to spread an 
awareness of other cultures 
throughout the College with special 
activities and guest speakers, accor- 
ding to Mrs. Fremiotti. 



Board of Trustees holds monthly meeting 

The monthly meeting of the Board of Trustees of the College was held at 8 
p.m., Thursday, Oct. 4, in the Lifelong Education Center. 

The Board took action on several items. They approved a resolution re- 
questing reimbursement of costs related to tne Stage I Building program from the 
State Public School Building Authority amounting to $2,367.25. 

The Board also approved thei984-85 college capital rebudget with few changes 
in revenues and no changes in expenditures. 

The Board made blanket approval of policies concerning the faculty and staff, 
including items concerning health insurance, sick days, emergency days, leave with 
pay when there is a death in the immediate family, and the personal use of College 
property and its facihties by the staff. 

The board took action on many personnel items, approving the resignations, 
transfers, and hirings involving 35 people. 

A report and slide show was presented by Dr. Ralph A. Home, director of 
construction technology, concerning the development of the Professional Develop- 
ment Center, a project utilizing student employment from the initial architecture to 
the labor involved in construction. 

A report also was given by Dr. Grant M. Berry Jr., dean of development, con- 
cerning a weatherization program to be implemented at the College. 



Program in entrepreneurship 
planned for Spring semester 



SPOTLIGHTDMooday. Ocl. 22, 19840? 



Courtesj- College Information Office 

The College has been awarded a 
grant to implement a "Competency- 
Based Program in Entrepreneurship", 
beginning with the Spring 1985 
semester. 

According to Dr. Donald 
Bergerstock, director of the Business 
and Computer Technologies Division 
and project director, the Pennsylvania 
Department of Education has granted 
$6,000 to the College for the program 
which will include the establishment of 
an Entrepreneurship Center as well as 
several modules of credit instruction. 

Dr. Bergerstock said the program 
is designed as a basic introduction to 



solving the problems of ownmg and 
operating one's own business. 

The program, which begins Jan. 8 
at the College, is designed to help 
small business owners or prospective 
small business owners. 

Mrs. Donna G. Pfeufer, instructor 
of business administration, will be 
coordinator of the Entrepreneurship 
Center. 

Persons interested in enrolling in 
any of the small business modules may 
do so at any time, the director said. 

Those who wish additional infor- 
mation may contact a Business and 
Computer Technologies Division 
representative by telephoning College 
Ext. 225. 

Counselor has transfer info 

Any student interested in the next several weeks, 
transferring credits to other colleges, Shoff reported that students now 

but who did not "take advantage of applying to other colleges who need 

Transfer Day", may contact Thomas assistance may confer with him per- 

C. Shoff, instructor-counselor at Col- sonally or refer to the transfer 

lege Ext. 339 or in Room 157 of the bulletins near Room 157, Learning 

Learning Resources Center, within Resources Center. 




^REAKIN'Jn front of the Academic Center on a balmy Fall day: Chad 
Yaw, 13, of WiUiamsport. (SPOTLIGHT photo] 

Seminar on eating disorders to be held; 
next Monday is deadline for sign-up 



A seminar on eating disorders 
--titled "Bulimarexia... Theory, 
Research, and Treatment" ~ will be 
held on Friday, Nov. 2, in the 
Academic Center Auditorium, accor- 
ding to Lawrence W. Emery Jr., direc- 
tor of Counseling, Career Development, 
and Placement. 



Intercollegiate sports topic 
at Student Government meeting 



The subject of intercollegiate 
sports was at the top of the Student 
Government Association's list last 
Tuesday evening when both Harry 
Specht. coordinator of intercollegiate 
athletics, and Rodney G. Hurley, in- 
terim dean of student services, 
debated both sides of the issue at an 
SGA meeting. 

Dean Hurley stressed that the 
issue is not the proposed sports cut; it 
has already been cut from next year's 
budget. The issue is, he noted: Do the 
students want the sports program 
back? 

According to Dean Hurley, ad- 
ministration made the decision to cut 
the intercollegiate sports program 
because it isn't a broad range activity 
that a large number of people benefit 
from. 

"Insufficient participation is not 
the primary concern," Dean Hurley 
said about the sports cut. 

Dean Hurley also showed SGA 
members a two-page article in the 
Chronicle of Higher Education, a 
leading newspaper for College ad- 
ministrators and other personnel, 
which featured intramural sports. 

"There is a new demand for in- 
dividual sports," Dean Hurley said. 
"The issue is that the administration 
has made a decision that the inter- 
collegiate program is one that does not 
provide the broad range of oppor- 
tunities to the student that.. .say, an 
expanded intramural or expanded 



special events program where we may 
bring in a performing group... Some of 
you may be interested in ballet, opera 
- something like that. Somebody may 
be interested in a hard rock band - 
something like that." 

Specht noted that he was not 
against the intramural athletic pro- 
gram, but said he feels it has adequate 
funding. "I think intramurals do have 
adequate funding. I agree that nobody 
has enough money. We could all use 
more," Specht said. 

Specht also pointed out that a 
women's cross coimtry team has been 
fielded for the first time in the Col- 
lege's history. "We had no money 
budgeted for it [women's cross coun- 
try] and we're stretching the men's 
cross country money to cover the 
females also," Specht said. 

Wayne M. parfitt, an auto body 
student from PottsviUe and cross coun- 
try runner, showed SGA a petition in 
favor of the intercollegiate sports pro- 
gram. The petition had 253 signatures 
on it, he said. "I've found that 98 per- 
cent of the people I ask are more than 
willing to sign my petition," Parfitt 
said. 

S"pecht and Parfitt jointly noted 
thau iieiLiier 01 tnem nad heard a 
negative reaction concerning retaining 
of the sports program. 

Dean Hurley also noted the future 
construction of tennis and basketball 
courts and the termination of plans for 
a student retreat center. 



"Four years ago, money was [set 
aside] and taken out of the student ac- 
tivities money and put toward 
something called the student retreat 
center. The place was going to be built 
so you could have your meetings 
there... but that's not realistic because 
students don't have that great of a 
need - and you weren't too happy with 
that, anyway. You thought it would be 
used more by the administration... 
That money has now been taken away 
from the student retreat center and 
has become part of the institution's 
match to get 50 percent more money 
from the state to match that [needed] 
to develop tennis courts, basketball 
courts, and playing fields," Dean 
Hurley said. 

"If you came forward with a good j 
rationale from a representative body i 
and really substantiated why you want i 
intercollegiate athletics, that would ;: 
get a lot more attention [from ad- i 
ministration]," Dean Hurley said. 

Dean Hurley noted that an "over- i 
whelming amount of [student] concern j: 
was not being voiced to S 
administration". :|: 

"If you [SGA] come to the ad- % 
ministration vrith a proposal that is i; 
well-reasoned and responsible and you ;: 
show that you have your act together, :;: 
then the administration would be tickl- i 
ed pink," Dean Hurley said. 

Specht noted that commitments S 
for the Eastern Collegiate Conference S 
have to be made by Nov. 1. 



Sign-up to take part in the seminar 
is required, he said, adding, "This is 
not a 'drop in between classes' pro- 
gram." 

The seminar is jointly sponsored by 
the Counseling, Career Development, 
and Placement Office, by the Penn- 
sylvania College Personnel Association, 
and the College's Center for Lifelong 
Education. 

Dr. Marlene Boskind-White, 
nationally-known authority, will present 
the topics of Bulimia (food bingeing) 
anorexia-nervosa (self-starvation). 

Faculty and staff may register with 
the CLE Office in the Academic Center 
at no charge with a tuition waiver for 
non-credit courses. 

Students, Emery said, who wish to 
participate must ~ and he emphasized 
"must" ~ sign up in the Counseling, 
Career Development, and Placement 
office by Monday, Oct. 29 - next 
Monday. 

"Students mustattend either the 
entire morning and/or afternoon ses- 
sion," he added. 

The CCDP Office is in Room 157, 
Learning Resources Center. 

The highest steady pressure ever 
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SaSPOTUGHTDMoaday. Oct. 22, 1914 

NYC bus trips 
scheduled 
for December 

The Intramural Athletics and Col- 
lege Activities Office has scheduled 
two bus trips to New York City for 
Saturday, Dec. 1, and Saturday, Dec. 
8. 

According to Mrs. JoAnn R. 
Fremiotti, coordinator of intramural 
athletics and College activities, the 
two excursions are open to any College 
students, faculty, staff, or alumni. 

"The fee is $18 for those with a 
College ID card and $20 for all 
others," she .said. "Anyone who wants 
to go along must make reservations - 
which will be taken on a first-come, 
first-serve basis." 

On both dates, the bus will leave 
for New York City at 6 a.m. from the 
Learning Resources Center bus loop. 
The arrival and departure point in 
New York City will be on the Fifth 
Avenue side of St. Patrick's Cathedral. 
The bus will leave New York at 9 p.m. 
both times. 

"There will be no breakfast or din- 
ner stops along the way," Mrs. 
Fremiotti said. "There is also no 
planned itinerary for either trip. This 
means that people can choose whether 
they want to shop, go sightseeing, or 
attend a play, movie, or other cultural 
event." 

There will be various cultural 
events happening in New York City on 
the trip dates, Mrs. Fremiotti added. 
She noted that "the New York Times 
Sunday section has information 
relating to cultural activities" and add- 
ed, "The College Library subscribes to 
that newspaper... for anyone who is in- 
terested." 

Anyone wishing to make a reser- 
vation or who wants additional infor- 
mation may contact Mrs. Fremiotti at 
College Ext. 269. 



BULLETIN BOARD 

For the week of Monday, Oct. 22 through Friday, Oct. 26 
MOVIE 
"The Man Who Loved Women"... 7:30 this evening. Academic Center 
Auditorium. $1 admission with validated student ID. $2 admission for all others. 
MEETINGS 
Alpha Omega Fellowship... 7 to 10 p.m., tomorrow, Tuesday, Oct. 23, 
Room 227, Academic Center. 

Phi Beta Lambda... 3:15 p.m., tomorrow, Tuesday, Oct. 23, Room 329, 
Academic Center. 

Student Govemment Association... 6 p.m., tomorrow, Tuesday, Oct. 23, 
Room 20.5 A, Learning Resources Center. 

SPECIAL ACTIVITIES 
Rollerskating... 8 p.m. to midnight, this Thursday, Oct. 25, at Skating 
Plus. $2 admission or free to faculty, staff, and students with validated Col- 
lege ID; skate rentals 75 cents. Sponsored by the Student Govemment 
Association. 

Computer demonstration... 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., Room 210, Lifelong Educa- 
tion Center. Open to all staff, faculty, and students on a "drop-in" basis. 



Job Opportunities 
for December Graduates 

[Information is provided by the Office of Counseling, Career Development, and 
Placement. Inquiries should be directed to that office which is in the Learning 
Resources Center.] 

The following are opportunities for permanent employment for 
December graduates: 

COMPUTER SCIENCE GRADUATES - The Pennsylvania Higher Educa- 
tion Agency, Harrisburg, Pa., will be hiring programmers in the near future. 
The Placement Office (in the Counseling, Career Development, and Placement 
Center in the LRC) will collect resumes from December 1984 graduates for 
these positions until Nov. 8, 1984. 

BUSINESS MANAGEMENT AND RETAIL MANAGEMENT - [1] Com- 
pumart, 485 E. Third St., would like resumes from December graduates for 
retail and catalog sales. Must have knowledge of computer. 

[2] Handy Markets, P.O. Box 292, Camp HUl, Pa., 17011, would like resumes 
from December graduates for manager trainees. They have a number of stores 
in Central Pennsylvania and will be interviewing in this area. 

MACHINE TOOL TECHNOLOGY AND MACHINIST GENERAL - 
GEECO, Inc., P.O. Box 341, Cockeysville, Md. 21030, (30 to 45 miles south 
of York) would like resumes from December 1984 and May 1985 graduates. 
Send them to the attention of Mark Shea at the previously listed address. 



Statement reviews 
sexual harassment 
definitions 

A statement reviewing the defini- 
tions of sexual harassment was releas- 
ed last week by Lawrence W. Emery 
Jr., director of Counseling, Career 
Development, and Placement. 

The statement noted that any 
violations of the College policy about 
sexual harassment should be reported 
to Emery in Room 157, Learning 
Resources Center. 

The complete text of the state- 
ment, as received by The 
SPOTLIGHT, is: 

Sexual harassmen is defined as: 

1. unwanted sexual advances. 

2. requests for sexual favors, and/or 

3. other verbal or physical conduct 
or written communication of an in- 
timidating, hostile, or offensive sexual 
nature. 

Where... 

a. submission to such conduct is 
made either explicitly or implicitly a 
term or condition of a student's status 
in a course, program, or activity. 

b. submission to or rejection of 
such conduct by a student is used as a 
basis for academic or other decisions af- 
fecting such student, or 

c. such conduct has the purpose or 
effect of substantially interfering with a 
student's educational experience or 
creating an intimidating, hostile, or of- 
fensive academic environment. 

Sexual harassment includes such 
things as offensive sexual remarks, cat- 
calls, whistles, etc., which are offensive 
in nature. 

The Board of Trustees has a policy 
which states that this behavior will not 
be tolerated and any violations should 
be reported to Lawrence W. Emery Jr., 
director of Counseling, Career 
Develeopment, and Placement, [in) 
Room 157, LRC. 



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Damon Thompson 
named to '85-'86 
'Who's Who' edition 

Damon Thompson, professor of 
English who last month had a poem, 
"On Returning", published in a West 
Coast anthology, has been named to 
the 1985-1986 edition of Who's Who 
in the East. 

This becomes the third con- 
secutive edition to which he has been 
named; he had previously been 
selected for the 1981-1982 and the 
198i -1984 editions. 

"On Returning" was published in 
an anthology titled 

"Our.. .Best. ..Poems". 

Thompson also was named during 
the past summer to the "Biographical 
Roll of Honor (Vol. I)", "The Directory 
of Distinguished Americans (2nd edi- 
tion)", and to "The International 
Who's Who of Contemporary Achieve- 
ment" which is published in England. 

Since 1981, Thompson has been 
named to approximately 18 
biographical reference encyclopedias 
published in this country and in the 
United Kingdom. 



Spotlight 




Monday, Oct. 29, 1984 Vol. 20, No. 11 12 Pages 
Williamsport Area Community College Williamsport, Pa. 17701 





Halloween 
Issue 



SPOTLIGHT Monday, Oct. 29, 1984 



Van purchased for student use 



SPOTLIGHT commentary 



SPOTLIGHT commentary 



Students uniting Alternatives to treats 
only proposal 
to help sports 



The SPOTLIGHT staff is very con- 
cerned about the College's Inter- 
collegiate sports program being 
dropped. 

None of the students on the staff 
compete on the intercollegiate level, but 
w/e do agree that the opportunity should 
exist for any other student who desires 
to do so. 

Student Interest is being express- 
ed at the present by the use of cir- 
culating petitions and voicing concerns 
At a recent Student Government 
Association (SGAI meeting, Rodney G. 
Hurley, interim dean of student ac- 
tivities, said that an "overwhelming 
amount of student concern was not be- 
ing voiced to the administration". 

The only means that the student 
body can be represented to the ad- 
ministration seems to be by petition and 
Dean Hurley rejected that proposal 

The fact is that the decision was 
made to discontinue intercollegiate 
sports after the 1 984- 1 985 school year 
without the opinions of Ihe students At 
this point, there has been very little 
negative response to retaining the pro- 
gram and the students, when approach- 
ed, seem to be interested in keeping 
competitive sports 

The success the College has had 
in the past does reflect some reason to 
be concerned over the decision to 
delete intercollegiate sports. 

The administrators have made the 
decision to eliminate intercollegiate 
sports from the upcoming budget and 
unless the student body can come up 
with a well-rounded reason why we 
wish to keep intercollegiate sports, they 
will not be kept. 

The students have to come 
together in a large number and direct 
their reasons and opinions to support 
the issue. 



The loss ol a child's lite because of 
tampered-with Halloween candy could 
turn the Halloween season into a tragic 
experience for parents. 

Although the tnajority of people 
who give halloween treats would not 
think about harming anyone, there is 
always -- as the saying goes - the "two 
percent". 

This is not to say the Halloween 
season should be forgotten There are 
ways to make Halloween safe such as 
visiting only people you know, holding 
a Halloween party rather than letting 
your children go trick -or-treating, giving 
gift certificates, accompanying your 
children where ever they go, and giv- 
ing non-edible treats. 

Although these suggestions may 
not seem "traditional", following them 
could very well save the lives qf your 
children or children close to you : 

TV review 



Miami cop series 
an eye-catcher 

By Anne T. fVloratelli 

"Miami Vice" is not your typical 
"cops and robbers" television crime 
drama The plots are intriguing and 
leave viewers anticipating the next 
scene. 

The series involves a rugged Miami 
cop portrayed by Don Johnson who is 
teamed up with a slick New York City 
cop, played by Philip Michael Thomas. 
Together, they drive fast, expen- 
sive cars, visit various locations and 
become involved in plenty of adventure. 
The star (Don Johnson) resides on 
a houseboat with the writer of the show \ 
incorporating an interesting twist by ad- ; 
ding a pet alligator, Elvis, to the format, i 

Also, in this series is a background ; 
music track that not only adds excite- \ 
ment, but also adds a new kind of flair, l 

It's a good show and something ; 
that should not be missedl 



;:;■; A van has been purchased for club 

:::: and College activity use, according to 
:|:| Mrs. JoAnn R. Fremiotti, coordinator 
rg of intramural athletics and College 
IS activities. 

51: The van - termed the "student 
:•:• van" - was purchased from Wolf- 
Hi ington Body Company Inc., of New 
I Buffalo, for the sum of $19,610, It was 
Jj: purchased with money from the stu- 
■:•: dent activities budget, said Mrs. 
S Fremiotti, 

S; In previous years, the College 

|:| rented a van from Van Campen 
S Dodge-Chrysler-Plymouth, of 

|: Williamsport. Last year, $7,890 was 
:| budgeted for the rented van. "We had 
il to pay (aside from the rental fee) for 
ji general maintenance, tires, and 
li everything. We also had to pay a cer- 
;•:■ tain amount if we went over a certain 
■ii mileage. It cost us more to rent than 
I to buy," Mrs. Fremiotti said. 

Requests to Mrs. Fremiotti 
jll All requests to use the van must 
i;l go through Mrs. Fremiotti first. 
I "Anything funded by student ac- 
S tivities budget has priority," Mrs. 
S Fremiotti said. "Curricular activities, 
i etc., have second choice," 
'i By curricular activities, Mrs. 



Fremiotti was referring to the cur- 
riculums [programs) at the College. 
"Say that broadcasting [the cur- 
riculum] requested the van for Dec. 8 
and the SPOTLIGHT [College activity] 
also requested the van for Dec. 8... 
Because the SPOTLIGHT is an activi- 
ty and broadcasting is a curriculum. 
SPOTLIGHT would have priority for 
use of the van in this situation," Mrs. 
Fremiotti explained. 

Cost listed 
Clubs and College activities will 
not be charged for the use of the van 
because the cost to use the van has 
already been allotted in the student ac- 
tivities budget. 

The only exception to this would 
be if constant use of the van causes the 
budget to completely "run out of 
money", according to Mrs. Fremiotti. 
"Curriculiuns, offices, etc. will pay 
mileage," Mrs. Fremiotti said. The 
cost to these groups will be 35 cents 
per mile. 

The person who drives the van for 
any of the groups need only be a Col- 
lege employee and to have a current 
driver's license, according to Mrs. 
Fremiotti. 



SGA senators for 1984-85 named 



No man can reveal but that which already lies half asleep in the dawning 
of another man's knowledge. 

ftSiȴA:;S::S::W:S:i?SSSSiSi5SSS^^ 

SPOTUGHT 
Monday, Ocl. 29, 1984 Vol. 20, I«o. II 

The SPOTLIGHT is published each Monday morning ol the academic year, except lor Col- ■ 
lege vacalions. by lournalism and olhei inleresled students ol The Williamsport Area Community : 
College Ollice Room 7. Academic Cenler. 1005 W Third St., WilliamspoM. Pa 17701 Telephone: • 
1/171 326-3761 ' 



Opin 



s expressed are those of the student newspaper oi ol those whost 
Opinions do not reflect official opinion ol the Institution, 



The SPOTLIGHT i 



nber of the Columbia Scholastic Press Association 



STAFF 

Donna M BarneM, managing editor; Karen M li/lelarko, editorial page editor; Gisela D Grassley 
photography ediloi, Mark S Schwanke, adminislralive altai-s editor, James K Morrissey stij^ 
dent allairs editor; Kalhryn M Gilberl, advertising manager, Rodney D Hill. sports editor Richard 
t Kopp Jr . senior stall writer 

BEPORTERS / STAFF ASSOCIATES 

Wanna F Brown. Melanie S Callahan. Kathleen L Eiswerl. George I Hawk Robert Vl/ MInier 
Anne T.Moialelli. Donald E Mumlord, Sandra L Musgrave, Judith L Swineharl, Sandra R Taylor' 
James E Treese, Jennifer S While, LeRoy S Whitmire Jr Canda M Zinck 

Faculty adviser Anthony N Cilio 

Production Staff Thia laane 
I, 'f"""' ^v M^""""' '"°'"'""'" supervisor; Gisela D Grassley, copy editor, Richard E. Kopp 
Jr . James K Moirissey. Mark S Schwanke, and Jennifer S, White, production assistants. 



'■:■ According to Steven D. Metzker, 
■; Student Government Association 
i (SGA) president and business manage- 
ij ment student from Williamsport, SGA 
?: senators for the 1984-1985 academic 
i year are: 

Bradley D. Steele, construction 
: carpentry student from St. Marys; 
i Gladys E. Hunsinger, electrical oc- 
i cupations, of Austin; Willard J. Ramph 
: Jr., industrial drafting, Williamsport; 
; Frank A. Lesher, tool design 
; technology, Hummelstown; Edward 
: C. Keyworth 3rd, retail management, 
Orwigsburg. 

Steven D. Metzker; Dennis Watts, 
aviation maintenance technician, Mid- 
dletown; Samuel A. Mundis, diesel 
mechanics, York; Jody K. Horn, 
general studies, Montoursville; 
Michael S. Ellis, general studies, 
Montoursville. 

Joseph J. Cammissa, graphic arts, 
Hazleton; James C. Benson, diesel 
mechanics. South Williamsport; 
Patricia A. Zaccaria, dietetic techni- 
cian, Williamsport; Stephen D. Welch, 
automotive mechanics, Danville; 
Harry A. Jones, nursery management, 
Girard, and Robert G. Davenport, ser- 
vice and operation of heavy construc- 
tion equipment, Berwick. 

The SGA Executive Committee 
chairpersons for the 1984-1985 
academic year are: President, Steven 
D. Metzker; vice president, Samuel A. 
Mundis: secretary. Donna M. Bamett. 



S:'*¥S:::SWS*¥SSSSSW.-¥ 



ft^■S¥^■SS¥SSS¥S!isasisWSii^KS® 



About the cover 




The artwork on the 


cover 


was done by Michael K. 


Reib- 


some, an advertising art student | 


from Bloomsburg. develop 


ng an 


Idea by Donna M. Ba 


rnett. 


managing editor of 


the 


SPOTLIGHT 





journalism student from Mifflintown 
treasurer, Edward C. Keyworth 3rd 
program development/evaluation of 
ficer, Frank A. Lesher; parliamen 
tarian/student action officer, James C 
Benson, and student awareness/com 
munications officer, Harry A. Jones 
[The SGA secretary is always the 
managing editor of the SPOTLIGHT 
and serves in an ex officio capacity.] 

Eating disorders 
seminar Friday 

A Bulimarexia Seminar will be 
presented by Dr. Mariene Boskind- 
White this Friday at the College. 

The seminar overview includes: 
Session I, Historical & Sociocultural 
Perspectives and Family Dynamics; 
Session II, What is Bulimarexia? Prog- 
nostic Considerations, Common 
Evasive Maneuvers, Strengths and 
Weaknesses of Short Term Group 
Psychotherapy. 

Dr. Mariene Boskind-White is a 
practicing psychotherapist specializing 
in the treatment of eating disorders. 

Additional information about the 
seminar is available from Miss Sandra 
L. Rosenberger, coordinator of 
community-based programs in the 
Center for Lifelong Education in the 
Academic Center, or by telephoning 
. College Ext. 378. 

Correcting the record 

In last week's edition of the 
SPOTLIGHT, a photograph was incor- 
rectly identified in the student opinion 
survey concerning the Lycoming Coun- 
ty Commissioners negative vote for 
sponsorship of the College. 

The SPOTLIGHT regrets the error 
and any embarassment it may have 
c,aM?ei;i,thp.perjSons involved. .. ._.. 



Women's Week 
planning session 
to be Wednesday 

Planning for the annual Women's 
Week at the College continues with a 
meeting set for noon this Wednesday 
in Room B107 of the Lifelong Educa- 
tion Center, according to Ms. Kathrjm 
A. Ferrence, career development 
specialist and co-adviser of the 
Women's Forum, which sponsors 
Women's Week. 

Ms. Ferrence noted that Dr. 
Cathryn L. Addy, director of North 
Campus in Wellsboro, will also be at- 
tending the meeting. 

Discussion will include comment 
on whether to hold one major women's 
event at the Main Campus or to have 
two events - one at the Main Campus 
and another at the North Campus. 

The co-adviser said the Women's 
Forum is still seeking members and 
she encouraged women to attend 
Wednesday's session. 

She also noted the evening coffee 
which the Women's Forum is sponsor- 
ing. That is set for next Monday, Nov. 
5,' from 6:30 to 9 p.m. in Le Juene 
Chef, the student-operated restaurant 
in the Lifelong Education Center. 

Additional information about the 
Women's Forum or Women's Week is 
available from Ms. Ferrence at College 
Ext. 398. 



College faculty 
needed to teach 
Elderhostel courses 

Three College faculty are needed 
to teach three courses offered in the 
Elderhostel program, according to 
Miss Sandra L. Rosenberger, coor- 
dinator of community-based programs. 

Miss Rosenberger said she will be 
sending memos to all faculty and that 
faculty will be paid for instructing the 
courses. Proposals must be submitted 
by the faculty by this Wednesday. 
For senior citizens 

Elderhostel is a program for 
senior citizens which is coordinated by 
Miss Rosenberger and given by the 
College in cooperation with Lycoming 
College. Lycoming provides the dorms 
and dining hall for those taking part. 

Elderhostel, the coordinator said, 
combines "the best traditions of educa- 
tion and hosteling. 

Cost is low 

It is a network of colleges, univer- 
sities, independent schools, folk 
schools, and other education institu- 
tions which offer special low-cost, 
short-term residential academic pro- 
grams for people over 60 or to those 
whose participating spouse or compa- 
nion qualifies. 

Additional information is available 
from Miss Rosenberger at College 
Ext. 378. 



Monday, Oct. 29, 1984 SPOTLIGHT 



Superintendents meet 
with College leaders 
to discuss sponsorship 



SGA Halloween video 
concert this Wednesday 

A Student Government Association (SGA) video concert will be held 
this Wednesday from 7:30 to 10 p.m. in the Gymnasium. 

Admission is free. 

According to Mrs. JoAnn R. Fremiotti, coordinator of intramural 
athletics and College activities, three videotape recordings are to be 
shown: "Billy Joel - Live from Long Island", "The Kids are All Right 
(a documentary of The Who), and "The Wall", a movie conceived by 
the members of Pink Floyd. 

"Anyone who would like to attend ina costume is welcome to do 
so," Mrs, Fremiotti said. 



School district superintendents 
from 14 of the 20 districts currently 
sponsoring the College attended a 
meeting concerning sponsorship last 
Wednesday at the College. 

According to Dr. Miles Williams, 
dean of employee and community rela- 
tions, the superintendents were asked 
by the College to go back to their 
respective districts and resolve to 
either: 

- make an affirmation of 
withdrawal, or: 

- relate an intent to rescind the 
previous resolution of withdrawal and 
indicate a willingness to renegotiate an 
agreement. 

Hopes to clear uncertainity 

The College made this request in 
the hope of removing the cloud of 
uncertainty that currently surrounds 
the College concemmg sponsorship, 
said Dr. Williams. 

A few of the superintendents said 
the two positions offered by the Col- 
lege were overly restrictive and that 
they would not want either option. 
These few related that they would wait 
and see how negotiations progress and 
then tell the College what they will do. 

Response needed by Dec. 1 

All but one of the superintendents 



at the meeting did say they would res- 
pond to the College proposal by Dec. 
1. But several superintendents insisted 
that it was futile to attempt 
renegotiation. 

Dr. Williams said he felt that since 
just 14 of the 20 districts involved 
were represented at the meeting, that 
was indicative of the problem of a flaw- 
ed sponsorship arrangement. 

With the districts so spread out 
geographically, it is extremely difficult 
to organize a meeting, much less 
resolve complex issues, he said. 
College will stay open 

While it remains to be seen who 
will sponsor the College, Dr. Williams 
said, "We are unequivocally convinc- 
ed the College will be open." 

Dr. Williams late last week made 
two other points. One is that the 
Lycoming County Commissioners 
have indicated a reconsideration of 
sponsorship if the sponsorshin uncer- 
tainty becomes a crisis. The other is 
that the College has received com- 
munications from State Rep. Russel 
Letterman and he is attempting to ral- 
ly the community colleges area of 
legislation around action which would 
assure continued operation of the 
College. . 



United Way drive at College 
surpasses goal again this year 

The College's 1984-1985 Lycom- As of press time late last week, a 
ing United Way Fund Drive topped total of $9,224 had been raised. This 
the $8,500 goal last Wednesday, accor- amount does not include approximate- 
ding to information provided by ly $400 which has been pledged to 
William C. Bradshaw, director of ex- Tioga County United Way Fund 



periential learning and College direc- 
tor of the campaign. 



Doggies hustled, 
artists plan to do 
sale every month 

Artists Unlimited met with 
such success during a hot dog 
sale last Wednesday that the 
plans now are to have one every 
month. 

The "world famous" - accor- 
ding to George E. Boudman Jr., 
club president - hot dogs steam- 
ed in beer and topped with either 
chili or sauerkraut were on sale 
in the Academic Center lobby 
from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. 

Boudman, an advertising art 
student from Millville, said the 
club netted $118.22 for its activi- 
ty fund by selling 200 hot dogs. 

"The sale was a big success 
- so much so that we plan on hav- 
ing one every month," Boudman 
said. 



Bloodmobile here this week; 
volunteers, donors needed 



The Bloodmobile, sponsored by 
the Lycoming County Chapter of the 
American Red Cross, the Health Oc- 
cupations Student Association 
(HOSA), and the Student Government 
Association (SGA), will be at the Col- 
lege tomorrow and Wednesday. 

The Bloodmobile will accept blood 
donors from 9:15 a.m. to 3:45 p.m. on 
both days in the Gymnasium, accor- 
ding to Mrs. JoAnn R. Fremiotti, coor- 
dinator of intramural athletics and Col- 
lege activities. 

To be used locally 

"All the blood collected by the Red 
Cross will be used locally," said Mrs. 
Fremiotti. "We are aiming for a goal 
of 440 pints from the College com- 
munity." 

She also stated that anyone 
wishing further information about 
donatig blood may contact Mrs. Janet 
R. Querimit, R.N., College nurse, in 



Room 104, Gymnasium. 

"Contrary to some rumors, you 
cannot get AIDS from giving blood," 
Mrs. Fremiotti added. 

Refreshments and snacks will be 
available in the Gymnasium for blood 
donors. Those who give blood are ad- 
vised by the coordinator to "eat a good 
meal beforehand". 

May save a life 

"Volunteers are needed to help 
recruit and assist donors and to set up 
and take down the equipment used by 
the Bloodmobile," Mrs. Fremiotti said. 

Anyone wishing to help by 
volunteering their services for the 
Bloodmobile tomorrow and/or 
Wednesday may contact her at College 
Ext. 269, she said. 

"Using a small amountof your 
time to give blood may save a life in 
the future," Mrs. Fremiotti added. 



drives, it was pointed out. 

General services staff noted 

Bradshaw called attention to the 
general services staff: 44 persons con- 
tributed over $1,300. 

According to Bradshaw, the finan- 
cial operations group became the Col- 
lege's third "100 percent team". 

Bradshaw's announcement noted 
that much of the drive's success should 
be credited to Frederick T. Gilmour, 
Donna M. Hensler, Rodney G. Hurley, 
Linda D. Emick, Donald E. Peterson. 
Russell E. Spring, James A. Garland 
Lawrence Stabler, Matilda S. Elmer, 
Lawrence W. Emery Jr., Diana L. 
Kuhns, Larry M. Richardson, Connie 
R. Kelsey, Kathy Dumanis, Linda J. 
Winiarczyk, JoAnn McFadden, Donald 
S. Shade, and Glenn R. Spoerke. 
Others recognized 

"Of course, the generosity of the 
250 other contributing faculty and 
staff can't be overiooked when thanks 
are given," Bradshaw added. 

The $9,224 total represents an in- 
crease of more than $1,000 over the 
amount raised during the 1983-1984 
campaign - which also exceeded its 
goal by about the same amount of 
$1,000. 



4 SPOTLIGHT Monday, Oct. 29. 1984 

Scumbuzzards win flag football title 

The intramural flag football tour- usual team and looking forward to 
nament is over and the Scumbuzzards revenge for what they thought was 
walked off as the proud champions of theirs. The Scumbuzzards. on the 
the two-month long tournament, ac- other hand, did not show up with their 
cording to Glen I. Korobov, College usual full team and were forced to play 
evening activities assistant. with what they had. 

The Scumbuzzards were formed at The first signs of success went to 

the Mean Moms as they scored the in- 
itial touchdown of the game and led, 
six to nothing. 

The Scumbuzzards then pulled 

The tournament champions went together and showed why they were 

gh the entire double elimination undefeated to that point and scored 

three unanswered touchdowns for a 

12-point lead over the runner-up team. 

With less than a half a minute left 

in the game, the score was still in favor 



n 



the start of the tournament as a last 
minute, pick up team - players who 
wanted to play, but were without a 
team. 



thr 

tournament undefeated 

They won the winners' bracket by 
defeating Mean Moms and that sent 
the Mean Moms to the losers' bracket. 

Mean Moms did earn their right of the Scumbuzzards by 12 points. But 

for another shot at the Scumbuzzards with 12 seconds left in the contest, 

when they took top honors in the Mean Moms were still playing the way 

losers' bracket and was the only team they had all through the tournament 

left to possibly spoil the Scumbuzzards and tallied the final touchdown - only 

hopes for the title. to fall short by a touchdown for the 

The two teams met last Monday at final score of 18 to 12, Scumbuzzards. 
5 p.m. in conditions that would leave The Scumbuzzards will be 

the name of the field known as the recognized at 8 p.m. on Thursday, 

"mud bowl" because of the steady day Nov. 1 in the Bardo Gym for their ac- 

of rain that particular day. complishment. Each player will 

Mean Moms showed up with their receive a plaque. 

Two teams share first place 

W.A.C.C. Five-0 remains in first Hin-i, ion.n „«-:« 

. , "*gn team series 

place, but the Pm Busters have pick- j vv A C C Five O 1853- 2 Pin 

ed up ground since the last report on b„^,^^^ ,^^^^; Lucky Stnke's, 17G2. 

bowhng and take a share of the top Hjg^ ^^^^ ^i^g,^ 

W.A.C.C. Five-O, G87; 2. We of Sgt. Slaughter and Lou Albano may 
isters, 612. be reading this - when comparing pro- 

Men's high series 

. lit..-, J XI n -• Rudy E. Long, 579; 2. Scott R 

became Lucky Strikes, and No. 8, t-.i,. --,. , ,-._i, I. _ . 

, . , , „, ri ,, r. » Kehs, 571; 3. Mark E. Reamsnyder, 

which became The Gutter Dusters. ,^p, ^ 

Team standings 




MEMBERS of the College's varsity basketball team prepare for their opener 
on Nov. 19 when they will compete in the Tip-Off Tournament. 
[SPOTLIGHT photo by Gisela D. Grassley] 




The Sidelines 



Sports Commentary 

By Rodney D. Hill 

SPOTLIGHT Sports Editor 



rawv^HAMn/MwAdi M i wM t u^»Mlu^ul^l^l'*^tku 




position 

Since the last report, two teams tu,.„ non. i n „ d . ,.,n 
,,, . ^ . Inrcc, b20;3. Pm Busters, 612, 

have changed their names for reasons 

not given. They are No. .5, which 



One professional sport that is so ed anyone would consider him as hav- 

insulting to the sport itself and to ing the same intelligence as an ox. 

other professional athletes is profes- 1 watched him one Saturday while 

sional wrestling. he was being his usual stupid self - and 

As much as 1 don't want to say it about two weeks later. I watched him 

and especially while some avid fans again on "The Price Is Right" as an 

intelligent human being who had a 

family cheering him on. 

There are also some well known 
amateur wrestlers who did go on to the 



The team standings, with the first 
number after the name represen- 
ting wins and the second number 
representing losses, are: 

1. W.A.C.C. Five-O, 11, 4. 

2. Pin Busters, II, 4. 

3. We Three, 9, 6. 

4. The Outlaws, 9, 6. 

5. Scratch, 7, 8. 

6. Lucky Strikes, 7, 8. 

7. Dew Crew. 6, 9. 

K, Gutter Dusters. (I, 15. 



[.. Sports * 
Schedule 

Intramural Sports 
Men's Basketball 

Monday: Bums vs. Payton Gang, 
7 p.m. 

Thursday: Knights vs. Bums, War- format 
riors vs. Yuk-A-Roidz, 7 p.m.; G'town pjayed 
vs. Corrosion, The Freeze vs. Payton Qn Mondays, Wednesdays, and 



Women's high series 

1. Denise M.McNeil, 357. 

Men's high single 
1. Mark E. Reamsnyder, 226; 
2. Rudy E. Long, 223; 3. Scott R. 
Kehs, 207. 

Women's high single 
1. Denise M. McNeil, 140. 

Top "5" averages 
1. Mark E. Reamsnyder, 199; 
2. Rudy E. Long, 178; 3. Barry A. 
Boney, 168; 4. Myles S. Murray, 1G6; 
5. Christopher L. Patrick, 164. 

Intramural bulletin board 
available in Bardo Gym 

A bulletin board of intramural 
sports is located inside the front en- 
trance of the Bardo Gym, according to 
Glen I. Korobov, College evening ac- 
tivities assistant. 

The bulletin board will include 

schedules, results of events and the 

which the events will be 



fessional wrestling to the smooth and 
methodical style of amateurs in high 

school and college, the professional professional ranks. Bob Backlund 
ranks are no more than bullies. They wrestled at the University of Min- 
don't even act like they are above the nesota and he was a two-time inter- 
level of the amateurs who are perfor- collegiate national wrestling cham- 



ming the "art" 

It's still an act 

1 will agree that professional 
wrestlers do spend a lot of time train- 
ing, but they spend even more time 
rehearsing. Try looking the definition 
up in an encyclopedia sometime; the 
chances are it will be defined as "a 
well-rehearsed act". 



pion. And he^seems to be quite 
successful. 

But when he takes those guys who 
are about twice his size and beats 
them... Then that in itself should cause 
some suspicion of phoniness. 
How about the blood? 
One thing that is typical of most 
devoted wrestling fans while arguing 
The next time you see a profes- the point of professional wrestling be- 
sional wrestling match, keep a close ing phony is: How do they account for 
eye on some of the contact. In a lot of the bleeding when they are -clubbed 
the blows, it may seem as though no over the head with a chair? 
contact was made. Well, first of all, that particular 

How about the wrestler named 



Gang, 8 p. 

Coed volleyball 

Monday: Net Busters vs 
Hulksters, 98-50's vs. X-T, 7 p.m. 

Men's volleyball 

Curran's Crew vs. winners oi 
Bums and Snorters, La Busch vs. win 
ner of Knights and Stringers, 8 p.m. 

Note: No events will 



Fridays, the bulletin board will be up- 
dated by noon. On Tuesdays and 
Thursdays, the board will be updated 
immediately following the events, said 
Korobov. 



George "the Animal" Steele? He acts 
so uncivilized that he actually goes in- 
to the ring and eats the turn buckles 
up. 

But he can be intelligent 

Another wrestler who comes to 

mind is Ox Baker. He wrestles in the 

Florida affiliation. This guy acts so 

stupid and inhuman that I'm surpris- 



stunt is so old they probably have some 
phony way of covering that up. Or 
maybe a good-sized bonus is offered 
for one of those stunts. 

If professional wrestling is so pro- 
fessional, then why can't we ever find 
the results of any given match in the 
newspapers or on the six or 11 o'clock 
news like other professional sports? 



SHOCKING NEWS 

James Donald French, who was 

held on ™"demned to die by electrocution, 

Tuesday ami Wedmsday because of the t"'""ed to a newsman on his way to the 
Bloodmobile activity going m in the '^^^" ""'^ suggested. "I have a terrific 
Gymnasium. headline for you in the morning... 

'French Fries'." 



STUDY OUTDOORS! 

Al The Natural Resource College 
Opertlngs ena Sctiolarships Available 



a Wildlife 

O Environmental Science 

■2 Fisheries & Aquatic Ecology 

□ Conservation Law Enforcement 



□ Natural Resources Administration 
D Outdoor Recreation 

Forestry 



Nln«_ 



D MN '85 D SEPT '85 
UNITY, MAINE 049B8 
(207) 948-3131 



Monday, Oct. 29, 1984 SPOTLIGHT 5 



Staff members attend conference Phi Beta Lambda members attend 
about Act 101 in state capital national leadership conference 



Three staff members from the 
developmental studies section of the 
College attended an Act 101 Institute 
training session in Harrisburg earlier 
this month, according to Dean R. 
Foster, director of developmental 
studies and Act 101 on campus. 

The program included a training 
session conducted by Dr. Milton C. 
Spann Jr. on reality counseling which 
was attended by James A. Bryan, 
counselor, and Weldon Michael, career 
development specialist. 

Breaking down barriers 

This session emphasized the 
counselor-student relationship and 
how barriers confronting the student 
can be alleviated so the student may 
achieve academic goals. 

A learning assistance program 
was presented by Professor Frank 
Christ and attended by Larry M. 

College positions 
still available 

Over eight job positions at the Col- 
lege are still available, according to in- 
formation from the personnel office in 
the Lifelong Education Center. 

All positions are available to per- 
sons already employed at the College 
and to persons not now employed at 
the College. 

Deadline near 

Opportunites in the ad- 
ministrative, professional and 
technical categories include director of ■ 
the physical plant and temporary full- 
time program assistant, Career Op- 
tions for Homemakers Program. 

Also open are the positions of 
coordinator of staff program and 
development, director of the In- 
tegrated Studies Division, and dean of 
student services. 

Extension number given 

In the faculty category, the Col- 
lege is looking for an aviation instruc- 
tor and part-time and substitute in- 
structors in electrical, cai-pentry, and 
plumbing. 

In the service category, there is an 
opening for a third shift custodian. 
There are no openings in the classified 
category. 

Additional information is available 
by telephoning College Ext. 314. 



Take Action 

on 
Your Rights! 

Remember... 

to Vote 
Tuesday, Nov. 6 



Richardson, Act 101 instructional 
specialist. 

This session included procedure, 
aid and development in the growth 
learning assistance support group, the 
evolution of learning assistance 
centers and student learning 
assistance programs. 

Seminar attended 

A seminar on recruiting students 
into technical colleges was attended by 
Foster. This seminar reviewed how in 
some technical colleges, similar to the 
Williamsport Area Community Col- 
lege, the student is the center focus. 
Faculty, noted Foster, get to know the 
student better, resulting in a better 
learning environment. 

The program covered two days 
and was sponsored by the Com- 
monwealth of Pennsylvania Act 101 
Western Region Directors Council. 



Eight members of Phi Beta Lamb- 
da (PBL) were to have attended the 
1984 National Eastern Fall Leader- 
ship Conference in Stamford, Conn., 
this past Friday, Saturday, and 
Sunday. 

Highlights of the conference in- 
cluded workshops on parliamentary 
procedure, interpersonal relations, and 
an overview of national Future 
Business Leaders of America/Phi Beta 
Lambda, according to David E. Daven- 
port Jr., a business management stu- 
dent from South Williamsport. 
Leaders to attend 

Prominent business leaders from 
across the country were featured 
speakers, according to Paul W. 
Goldfeder, PBL adviser. 

Among them were Salem Miller, 
Nebraska Department of Education; 
Dr. Edwin Graham, director of Exter- 
nal Relations Project for the American 
Council of Life Insurance, and Eric 



1- "^ 



Maggie Trafford (center), assistant manager of the Maynard Street Burger 
King, presents checks for $250 each to Regina M. Krumenaker, left) food 
and hospitality student from Williamsport, and to Frances L. McConnell, 
dietetic technician student from Hughesville. The checks represented this 
year's awards from a scholarship fund from Burger King. Mrs. Ann R. 
Miglio, food service and food and hospitality instructor, and Mrs. Vivian 
P. Moon, associate professor of food service and dietetics, select two 
second-year students from the food service curriculums based on academic 
achievement and financial need. The scholarship, in its fifth year, was raised 
from the $175 given last year. [SPOTLIGHT photo] 



North Campus 
celebrates second 
year of operation 



Celebrating the second year of 
= operations at the North Campus of the 
College will be about 150 area business 
and school board members, area coun- 
ty commissioners, and faculty 
members. 

The observance will be at a 5 to 7 
p.m. reception this Wednesday at the 
campus in Wellsboro, according to 
Mrs. Linda D. Cheyney, secretary to 
the director of North Campus. 

Dr. Robert L. Breuder, College 
president, is expected to give a few 
remarks at the reception, the 
secretary added. 

Those in attendance will include 
county commissioners from Tioga, 
. Bradford, and Potter Counties as well 
as school board members from 
Wellsboro, Northern Tioga, and 
Southern Tioga School Districts. 



Hilton, senior vice president of the 
Hilton Hotel Corporation. 

Over 400 students from 75 col- 
leges and universities from 10 states 
in the East were expected to attend, 
Goldfeder said. 

Campus group represented 

Members of the campus PBL 
chapter who were to have attended are 
Jonathan F. Miller, computer science 
student and PBL president; Daven- 
port; Judy L. Brokaw, computer 
science student from Canton; Sheryl 
L. Wilkins, secretarial science student 
from Lawrenceville; Britt 0. Stock, ac- 
counting student from Liberty;. Myra 
K. Sindlinger, business management 
student from Liberty; Russell D. Fry, 
computer science student from 
Williamsport, and Sheridan T. Haines, 
computer science student from Flem- 
ington. Goldfeder also was to have 
attended. 

Workshop well attended 
Dean Hurley reports 

Three representatives of the Col- 
lege recently conducted a two-day 
workshop dealing with the College's 
strategic long range planning during 
a meeting of the Association of Com- 
munity College Trustees (ACCT) in 
San Antonio, Texas. 

Attending were Dr. Robert L. 
Breuder, College president; HoSneyU™ 
Hurley, dean of educational research, 
planning, and evaluation, and Dr. 
Daniel J. Doyle, professor of history, 
government, and sociology. 

Dean Hurley said the workshops 
were very well attended and, for the 
first time, so many applied that some 
had to be turned away. 

The workshop dealt with the Col- 
lege's strategic long range planning 
and was received with "almost rave 
reviews", according to Dean Hurley. 

The assembly was entirely paid for 
by ACCT and it included four other 
workshops: an alumni relations 
academy, an institution related foun- 
dations academy, a legal/employee 
relations academy, and a trustee orien- 
tation and reorientation academy. 



Do yoa know? 

Whit do each of the foDowing 
initials stand for 

1. AW0L2. AT&T3.ABM4. 
CARE 5. VTOL 6. SRO 7. KGB 

Answers 

■i)unN$ »ms 101 Ml 
-|nnnio3 '^ l|ao mooj Snjpntis 
■9 Saipoii JO uo-9i(B| inijiSA 'S 
■sni u)qMija*3 pipH oKHiamv 
joj 9»puadoo3 '^ -Jijisioi 

}ns!n«i-n>>v f "O q<i»^»x 

pnt 9uoqd3|3X nuuimi 7 
aAB3| inoqiiM inssqv °I 



SPOTLIGHT Monday. Oct. 29, 198J 



'It was fun...' 

Phi Beta Lambda members build float 



Photos omd Text 
By Richaid E. Kopp Ji. 
Of The SPOTUGHT Stall 

The theme ol this yeoo-'s biggest 
blockbuster movies 

"Ghostbusters" -- was used lor the 
basis ol Ptii Beta Lambda s Doat 
wtiich was entered in the 39th an- 
nual Mummers' Day parade in 
South Witliamsport lost Saturday. 

About 10 Ptii Beta Lambda 
(PBL) members participated in the 
construction ol ttiis year's float. 
They started plans for the float on 
Saturday, Oct, 13, 

Jonathan F. Miller, a computer 

science student Irom WUUamsport 

and PBL president, originated the 

idea of using the Ghostbusters 

■ Iheme. 

"1 was sorry to see that more 
people were not there to enjoy the 
building of the float," MiUer said. 

The club president brought the 
wagon to the home of David E. 
Davenport Jr. , a business manage- 
ment student Irom South 
WiUiamsport and chairperson of 
the float committee . There, it was 
put together. 

Inloimotion gatheied 

Miller and Davenport designed 
the_ float, 

'Mrs. Phoebe B, Thompson, a 
business management student 
from WUUamsport. called Shim's 
Pontiac-Oldsmobile-Cadillac- 



GMC, to find a truck and a driver 
to puU the float in the parade 
Dave Shim put her in touch with 
Ken Kibbe, a salesman at Shim's, 
who agreed to do the job. 

Davenport called the UA 
Theatres in the Loyal Plaza for in- 
formation on "Ghostbusters ". 
George R, Smith, manager of the 
theaters, invited members of PBL to 
attend the movie for free. 

Tliis was to aUow them to pull 
some ideas out ol the movie and 
use them on the float. Smith also 
gave PBL a poster for the float and 
approximately 500 buy-one-get- 
one-fiee passes to "Ghostbusters " 
- to be passed out during the 
parade. 

Fen fiom complete 
During the week the float was 
constructed, things moved along 
slowly. A power saw burned up 
and the PBL workers were not able 
to get another one that night. On 
the Friday before the parade, it 
rained - so no work could be 
done. 

On the day of the parade, the 
float was far from complete. This 
fact did not hinder the efforts ol the 
six PBL members who were Uiere to 
help. 

A few hours before starting 
time, Mrs. Thompson was frantic - 
running around getting paint and 
suppfies needed (or the Ifnlshing 
touches. 



Tilings looking bettei 

MUler remained calm as he 
busUy sawed, hammered, and 
painted. He knew the float woiUd 
be completed on time for the start 
of the parade. 

When Kibbe arrived, he look- 
ed at the partly -flnished float and 
with skepticism said he would 
return after he had had something 
to eat. 

And when he did retum, things 
were looking better. The trcriler was 
hooked up and taken to its startLng 
place about one hour before the 
scheduled start of the parade. 
It was worth it 

As the starting time neared, 
tilings seemed to fall into place for 
the float crew. The finishing 
touches were applied with ease as 
everyone worked together. 

Mrs. Thompson applied the 
details to the costumes for Miller, 
Davenport, and Timothy P. MUler, 
a computer science student from 
Castanea — who were the 
Ghostbusters. (The Millers are not 
related.) 

Brenda S. Cole, a computer 
science student from WUliamsport 
- who played Uie part ol the villain 
~ checked her make-up. 

Everything was set for the start 
of the parade. 

'^Ime me' the? yelled 

A quick review showed only 
two casualties: A misjudged stroke 



ol a paint brush gave the club 
president's watch a little black 
paint and an untimely lean gave 
Mrs. Thompson's blazer and dress 
white blobs of paint. 

All the efforts of the PBL 
members were weU worth the end 
result ~ as was proved by the 
young parade enthusiasts who 
proudly displayed their 
Ghostbusters shirts and yeUed out 
things such as "Yea. 
GhosflDusters!" and "SUme me!". 
'Really a lot ol fun' 

Ronald J. Wright, a broad- 
casting student from WUliamsport. 
made a production tape of the 
theme song from ' 'Ghosflousters" to 
be played along the parade route. 

Tina E. Poust. an accounting 
student from Hughesville. and 
Jamison D. Stark walked along the 
parade route and gave out the 
free passes. 

The float was the best of the 
three Ghostbusters theme- 
originated floats in the parade, ac- 
cording to MicheUe D. Stover, a 
computer science student from 
South WUliamsport. "The costumes 
ol the guys were good, ' ' she said. 

"I thought the cooperation ol 
the PBL members was good." 
Smith said. 

Mrs. Thompson commented. 
" AU in aU. the buUding ol the float 
was really a lot of fun!" 




mmtsmsm^mam 



Monday, Oct. 29. 1984 SPOTLIGHT 7 




Opposite page fiom left aie: 

Jonathan F. Miller, computer 
science student fiom Williamspoit 
and club president, Timothy P. 
Miller, computer science student 
trom Castanea, David E. Daven- 
port Jr, , business management stu- 
dent of South Williamsport. and 
Brenda S, Cole, computer science 
student ol Williamsport. Lett cor- 
ner: After the power sow ' 'burned 
up ■ ' there wasn 't much that could 
be done until "tomonow" Right 
comer: "Working hard". Middle 
lett: Don't miss any! Tina E. Poust, 
accounting student from South 
Williamsport. Middle: Jonathan 
Miller. William M Johnson, com- 
puter science student from Houtz- 
dale; Davenport; Sheridan T, (Ted) 
Haines, computer science student 
from Hemington, and Britt O. Stock, 
accounting student from Liberty 
Below that: PBL members who 
rode on float took time for picture- 
posing. And below that: Phoebe B. 
Thompson, business management 
student from Williamsport. puts 
finishing touches on float. Right 
middle: A last minute idea tunis 
out to be a pain in the shoulder for 
Davenport Left bottom: Cole 
gives the ghost a face. 



s^mmMMs, 



8 SPOTLIGHT Monday, Oct. 29. 1984 



Would You Save the Life 
of Someone You Love? 

DO IT! 

Give. . . 

Bloodmobile is liere 

Tomorrow 

and 
Wednesday 

Bardo Gym / Starting 9:45 Both Days 





^ ^-x-^S-vv ^^^v■!:5ftS¥SS¥S,^•■^ -f^ ■■ J 




What can 1 




\ do about 


• 


the 




sponsorship 


1 


question? 




Next week... 




Suggestions 




about how 




students 




can learn about 




the 




sponsorship 




issue... 




and 




what the 




individual 




can do about it 



Le Juene Chef Menu 

Le Juene Chef is open for lunch 
from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. every Tuesday, 
Thursday, and Friday, and from 11:30 
a.m. to 1 p.m. on Wednesdays, when 
the menu is selected by the student 
managers. 

The menu for this week includes: 
Tuesday, Oct. 30 

Stuffed Manicotti shells: $2.85 
meal includes entree, baby limas or 
peas country style, Moroccan salad, 
corn meal muffins, and beverage. A la 
carte items are cream of mushroom 
soup at 65 cents a cup or 75 cents a 
bowl, lemon chiffon dessert at 55 
cents, and banana foster dessert at 60 
cents. 

Thursday, Nov. 1 

Fish Creole on Rice: $1 meal in- 
cludes entree, broccoli goldenrod or 
cauliflower, French bread, and 
beverage. A la carte items are egg 
drop soup at 65 cents a cup and 75 
cents a bowl, pineapple dream dessert, 
55 cents, and snowball dessert, 70 
cents. 

Friday, Nov. 2 

Country Style Meatloaf: $2.85 
meal includes entree, honey glazed 
carrots or scalloped corn, and whole 
wheat rolls. A la carte items are cream 
of asparagus scup at 65 cents a cup or 
75 cents a bowl; Montego Bay Mousse, 
75 cents, or frozen yogurt parfit, 65 
cents. 

ITS A LIVING 

Included in a listing of very odd 
jobs is a ball picker - a person who 
picks up unclaimed baseballs, golf 

balls, and the like to keep recreation 
areas clean. 



Monday, Oct. 29, 1984 SPOTLIGHT 9 

Mid-eastern dance classes 
to begin this Wednesday 

Two classes in mid-eastern dance - one for children and one for adults - 
will begin Wednesday in South Williamsport. 

The classes are being offered through the College's Center for Lifelong 
Education. Both classes will meet from Wednesday through Dec. 19 in the Cen- 
tral Elementary School. 

Mid-Eastern Dance for Children is designed for students age 6 through 13 

The class will meet from 6 to 7 p.m..and the fee is $8. 

Mid-Eastern Dance for Adults will meet from 7 to 9 p.m. The fee is $24. 

Students can sign up for these classes on a space available basis at the first 
or second meeting of the class or they can register in advance at the Academic 
Center on Main Campus. 

Additional information is available by visiting or calling the Center for 
Lifelong Education, (717) 326-3761, Ext. 378. 




TREAT - NO TRICKS! 

W.A.C.C. BOOKSTORE 
LRC BUILDING 

20 PERCENT OFF 

ALL MERCHANDISE 

EXCEPT TEXTBOOKS 

Wednesday. Oct. 3t, 1984 

20 Prize Giveaway! 

Clothing, Gifts, Candy, Cards, Boolis, and Computer Accessori<» 




For Spring Semester 



(ENL 251-01) 

Masters of Horror 



An excursion into Ihe literature, film, recordings, and art- 
work of the horror genre, including Frankenstein, Poe, and 
the history of both horror comic and the horror film! 

MWF 11-12 

For further information, contact: 

Dr. Pete Dumanis 

(any iniiniiiiasi 

Room 31 7, Academic Center 
Call Ext. 331 or Ext. 404 

Register Now 

Enter at your own risk!! 



10 SPOTLIGHT Mondaj, Oct. 29, 1984 




LUNCHING in the Le Juene student-operated restaurant recently was the 
Williamsport Rotary Club. According to Dr. Miles Williams, dean of 
employee and community relations, the club heard remarks from Dr. Robert 
L. Breuder. College president. The president also gave the club members 
a tour of the Lifelong Education Center. The dean noted that the club re- 
quested lunch and a tour through the building due to the "positive remarks 
they received" from the community concerning the facility. /SPOTLIGHT 
photo by Gwela D. Grassleyj 

Workshop for displaced homemakers 
set for November at North Campus 



"Putting the Pieces Back 
Together" is the title of a Nov. 12 to 
16 workshop for displaced 
homemakers which will be held at the 
North Campus, according to Mrs. 
Beverly McOill, coordinator of the 
displaced homemakers office at the 
Wellsboro campus. 

The workshop - at no cost to par- 
ticipants and which includes free child 
care and transportation - is being held 
to encourage community awreness in 
relation to the needs of the displaced 
homemaker. 

Definition given 

Mrs. McGill, who became coor- 
dinator when the office was opened in 
early September, defined a displaced 
homemaker: one who through separa- 
tion, divorce, or widowhood has found 
that the source of economic support is 
lost. 

Daily workshop hours will be from 
9:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. 

Topics are: 

- Monday: "Communication and 
Confidence Building", by Ms. Anne 
Cridler, a counselor at the North Cam- 
pus, and "Coping with Grief and 



88.1 FM 

Everything You 

Always Wanted in a 

Radio Station... and 

Less. 



Anger", with Dr. Robert Most, direc- 
tor of the North Penn Mental 
Health/Mental Retardation program in 
Blossburg. 

- Tuesday: "Stress Manage- 
ment", with Jery Jachim, a therapist 
who also is with the North Penn 
program. 

Job outlook is subject 

- Wednesday: "Time and Money 
Management", by Mrs. McGill. 

-Thursday: "How to Find a 
Career", with William Miller and Ms. 
Bonnie Clark, from the Tioga County 
Career Planning and Job Placement 
Office, and "The Job Outlook in Tioga 
County" [where the North Campus is 
located], with Ms. Maria Keck, from 
the county's Job Service office. 

- Friday: A variety of community 
and business leaders will be on hand 
for a look at community resources. 

, Mrs. McGill stated that par- 
ticipants are to bring a bag lunch. 

She added that registration for the 
workshop is requested, but not re- 
quired and noted that there is no 
deadline for registration. 



Hunt Seat Riding class 
to meet Saturday mornings 

A cla.ss in Hunt Seat Riding will he 
offered Nov. 3 through Dec. 1 at the 
Summer Breeze Stables. The class will 
meet on Saturday mornings from 9 to 
11 a.m. 

Offered by the College's Center 
for Lifelong Education, the class will 
be taught by Janice Phillips. The total 
fee is $50. 

Information is available from the 
Center for Lifelong Education in the 
Academic Center or by telephoning 
(717) 326-3761, Ext. 378. 



k Classical 
, Rock t Roll 



Commercial Free 



/ ■•«i- ^SSSSSKftS 



LEARN WHILE YOU EARN 

Teach Skin Care and Color Analysis 

Pan-lime or Full-lime 

As many or as few hours as you wish. 

Call 326-0362 After 5 p.m. 



New non-credit courses start 
this week at Main Campus 



Courtesy Colkge Information Office 

Courses designed to make the 
holidays more fun and less expensive 
are among the nearly 50 courses being 
offered during the Fall 1984 Second 
Session at the College. 

The non-credit courses are made 
available through the College's Center 
for Lifelong Education. Also schedul- 
ed are children's courses and offerings 
in business and professional develop- 
ment, communications and language, 
fine arts and creative design, food and 
drink, sewing and needlecraftrs, shop 
skills, special interests, and sports and 
recreation. 

Some begin this week 

Beginning today are Changing 
Careers, Sanitation and Safety Pro- 
cedures, Conversational French for 
Children, and Personal Financial 
Planning. 

Slated to begin tomorrow are 
Rollerskating Two for Children, 
Frames for Arts and crafts. Effective 
Communication, Old Time Banjo Two, 
Colonial Lampshades, Photo/Por- 
traiture, Silk and Dried Decorations 
Two, Break Baking, Mixology One, 
Counted Cross-Stitch for Christmas, 
Quilts/Sampler, Residential Wiring, 
Judo, and Rollerskating Two for 
Adults. 

Wednesday offerings 

Printed Advertising, Computer 
Literacy, Conversational Polish, Cake 
Decorating Two, Auto Tune-up and 
Maintenance, History of French 
Civilization, Aerobic Exercise, Hatha 
Yoga One and Hatha Yoga Two all 
begin Wednesday. 

Beginning Thursday, Nov. 1, are 
Lampshade Construction, Music 
Theory Two, Landscape and Close-Up 
Photography, Stained Glass, pattern 
Fitting, Decorative Stenciling, 
Astronomy, Aerobic Exercise, and 
Ballroom Dance. 



Printmaking for Children, Roller- 
skating One for Children (two sec- 
tions), all begin on Nov. 3. Corn Husk 
Crafts and Mixology One begin on 
Nov. 5. 

Other classes, starting times 

Other campus-based non-credit 
courses are slated to begin as follows: 
Pattern Fitting, Nov. 11; Silk and 
Dried Holiday Decorations, Nov. 12: 
Upholstering Workshop, Nov. 13; 
Upholstering Workshop, Nov. 14 
Upholstering Workshop, Nov. 19; 
Holiday Workshop (two sections), Dec. 
4, and Holiday Workshop (two more 
sections), Dec. 5. 

Registration can be completed in 
person, through the mail, or until the 
second class meeting on a space- 
available basis. 

After the second class meeting, no 
registrations will be accepted. 

Mail in registrations may be sent 
to The Student Records Office/Non- 
Credit Registration, The Williamsport 
Area Community College, 1005 W. 
Third St., Williamsport, Pa. 17701. 

In-person registration can be com- 
pleted at the Student Records Office, 
Room 108, Academic Center, Monday 
through Friday from 8 a.m. to 4:30 
p.m. or at the Center for Lifelong 
Education, Room 102, Academic 
Center, Monday through Thursday, 
from 4:30 to 10 p.m. 

Senior citizens may enroll in any 
non-credit course on a space-available- 
basis for a tuition cost of $3 per per- 
son. Cost of materials, supplies, books, 
and other expenses is not included in 
the tuition fee. These participants will 
be responsible for paying the lab fees 
or other materials costs. 

Additional information is available 
from the Center for Lifelong Educa- 
tion, (717) 326-3761, Ext. 231. 



ITS 22 YEARS LATER, 

*AND NORMAN BATES 

IS COMING HOME. 




$1 (with ID) 
$2 (without ID) 



Tonight 7:30 p.m 
ACC Auditorium 




SPOTLIGHT Monday, Oct. 29, 1984 11 



SEND IN THE CLOWNS -- Members of the "clowning class" at the Col- 
lege and their instructor livened up the Mummers' parade in South 
Williamsport. Most identities were well concealed by lively make-up, but 
Barbara Marshall, the instructor, was spotted with her clown "MUSIC" 
horn... And, a SPOTLIGHT photographer recognized ~ on the end at left 
— Thomas M. Winder, associate professor of computer science. 
{SPOTLIGHT photo by Richard E. Kopp Jr.] 

Scheduling for Spring semester 
begins Monday; see adviser now 



Scheduling for the Spring 
semester begins on Monday with 
students who have recorded 47 to 53 
credits. 

Students are being advised to see 
advisers now through Friday to com- 
plete the "course request form" in 

Mums on sale 

The Horticulture Club will be sell- 
ing mums from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. 
Wednesday in the Academic Center 
lobby and in the Learning Resources 
Center lobby, according to Harry A. 
Jones, nursery management student 
from Girard and club president. 

Price for the mums will be $2.25 
a bunch, he noted. 



preparation for formal schedulmg next 
week. 

Formal scheduling will be done in 
the lounge area of the Academic 
Center. Students are to report during 
the assigned times, according to the 
number of credits they have ac- 
cumulated so far in their College 
studies. 

A completed course request form 
is necessary to complete scheduling. 

While scheduling is to be com- 
pleted in early November, fees are to 
be paid by Dec. 20. A Records Office 
announcement says the schedule is 
guaranteed until Dec. 20. 

Non-degree students register from 
Nov. 12 until Dec. 20 from 9 a.m. to 
3 p.m., Mondays through Fridays, at 
the Student Records Window in the 
Academic Center. Their fees, too, 
must be paid by Dec. 20. 



SUSQUEHANNA 
SCXJND 

Mulri-rracK P^ecording School 

48 A Street • Northumberland. PA 17857 

YOU WANT A CAREER IN THE RECORD BUSINESS? 
DON'T CALL US. WE'LL CALL YOU 

Without practical experience, this is what you might 
hear. We Can help. We are Susquehanna Sound Multi-track 
Recording School, a 24 track computerized facility which 
offers "hands on" experience with a wide range of state- 
of-the-art equipment. Instruction such as this is essentia 
to anyone who plans to be involved in the music, radio, 
advertisement, or recording industries. Classes are held 
in the evenings. The next session begins on Jan. 7th, 
so give us a call for details and ask about our free 
studio tour. Our number is 473-9733. We can give you 
the sound edge you need, right now. Ask for Scott. 



ACROSS 
1 Metal 
6 Article of 
furniture 

1 1 Indolent 

12 The East 

14 Parent: 
colloq 

15 Broke 
suddenly 

17 About 

18 Beverage 
20 Worms 



DOWN 

1 More trite 

2 Note of scale 

3 Dawn 
goddess 

4 Slave 

5 Rents 

6 Drunkards 

7 War god 

8 Proposition 

9 French article 
10 Sign up 



21 King Arthurs 11 City in 



lance 
22 Flock 

24 Goddess of 
healing 

25 Pinochle 
term 

26 DarK 

28 Periods of 
rest 

30 Wine cup 

31 Silkworm 

32 Dormant 
35 Wisest 

38 Goddess of 
discord 

39 Dress border 

41 Without end 

42 Part of circle 

43 Sufferer from 
Hansen's 
disease 

45 French for 
"summer" 

46 Compass 
point 

47 Figures of 
speech 

49 Symbol for 
tantalum 

50 Sleeping- 
sickness fly 

52 Surgeon's 
Instument 

54 Snares 

55 Freshet 



Nebraska 
13 Cares for 
16 Greek letter 
19 Eccentric 
21 Mitigate 
23 Cupolas 
25 Join 
27 Pale 
29 Edible seed 

32 Smallest 
number 

33 Apprehend 



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34 Subjects of 
discourses 

35 Odors 

36 Sofa 

37 Handle 



44 Harvest 

47 Music: as 
written 

48 Nahoor 
sheep 



40 Slender linial 51 Teutonic 
43 Speech deity 

impediment 53 Cent: abbr. 



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'^ 1983 Unltad Fralure Syndicate, Inc. 



Only 10.48 percent of the About 70 million Americans live 

Colleges total capital budget comes „here there i'i maior or moderate rid of 

from the 20 sponsoring school wnere mere is major or moaeraie nsK 01 

districts. earthquakes. 



-al^ 



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1307Vi Washington Boulevard • Williamsport, Pennsylvania 17701 • 

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KENWOOD 

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Includes Audio Technica AT HE Cartridge 

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12 SPOTLIGHT Monday, Oct. 29, 1984 




I 1 

BULLETIN BOARD 
I I 

COIN' FOR IT - For tfie week of Monday, Oct. 29 through Friday. Not: 2 

William T. Kauf- MOVIE 

man, general "Psycho 11"... 7:30 this evening, Academic Center Auditorium, $1 admis- 

studies student sion with validated College ID, $2 admission for all others. 

from Mahanoy City, MEETINGS 

during varisty Student Government Association... 6 p.m., tomorrow, Tuesday, Oct. 30, Room 

basketball practice. 20.5A, Learning Resources Center. 

Season begins soon. Alpha Omega Fellowship... 7 to 10 p.m., tomorrow, Tuesday, Oct. 30, Room 

ISPOTUGHT photo 227, Academic Center. 

hit Gisela D. Phi Beta Lambda... 3:15 p.m., tomorrow, Tuesday, Oct. 30, Room 329, 

Cmsaleyl Academic Center. 

Rollerskating... 8 p.m. to midnight, this Thursday, Nov. 1, at Sl<ating Plus, 
$2 admission or free to faculty, staff, and students with validated College ID; 
skate rentals, 7.5 cents; sponsored by the Student Government Association. 

SPECIAL EVENTS 
Bloodmobile... 9:45 a.m. to 3:45 p.m., tomorrow, Tuesday, Oct. 30, and 
Wednesday, Oct. 31, Bardo Gym; sponsored by the Lycoming County Chapter 
of the American Red Cross, SGA, and HOSA. 

Video concert... 7:30 to 10 p.m., this Wednesday, Oct. 31, Bardo Gymnasium, 
featuring Billy Joel, The Who, and Pink Floyd; sponsored by the Student 
Government Association; admission free. 



Permanent Employment for Graduating Students t^ooo'c NiP-ht 

[These announcements are provided by the Office of Counseling, Career Developrmnt, and Placement and published by ^-^ \JiJiJ >J O 

the SPOTLIGHT as a campus service. Questions about information here should be directed to the CCDP Office in the J- -^ VkO Vl <3il f\ 
Learning Resources Center.} '^^ UC IICIM. 

next Thursday 



Attention civil engineering technology, architectural technology, and engineering drafting technology students - 
Kurtanich Engineers & Associates, Inc., 6124 East State Street, P.O. Box 1267, Hermitage, Pa, 16148, a small con 
suiting engineering firm, is interested in receiving resumes from graduating students. A brief resume can be seen ir 
the Placement Office, LRC-157. 



Baltimore Life Insurance Co., Four Mile Drive and Northway Road, Williamsport, Pa. 17701, wants to talk with 
students about their aptitude for the company's profile test for careers in insurance. If interested, call Jack Derfler, 
staff manager, at [717] 326-2661. 

S. Grumbacher & Son, P.O. Box 2821, York. Pa. 17405 (parent company of Bon-Ton, Eyerly's, Fowler's, Mailmans, 
Maxwell's) would like resumes from business graduates who are interested in an exciting and challenging career in 
retailing. Executive training programs are scheduled to begin within their company in January 1985 as well as during 
the summer of 1985. Interested students should submit their resume to the attention of Constance C. Lewski or may 
contact her at [717] 757-7660, Ext. 1385 for more information. 

E & A Design Corporation, Engineering and Advertising, 44 Bridge St., Corning, N.Y. 14830 would appreciate 
resu mes of students with all types of technical backgrounds to keep on file for future references. 

IMPOSSIBLE 

Some of the dumbest sayings of the 
English language include it's as cold 
as hell, sleep tight, Tiead over heels in 
love, and paying through the nose. 



* FCillo's 

^ College Corner 



We'll prepare your 
favorite Subs and Burgers 



the way you like them! 



PlayLUCKY NUMBERS 

and 

win a half sub 

plus medium drink 

(■"our Winners 
Every Week 



1100 W. Third SI.. Williamvp.ir 
(Nti< Id Acidemii Center) 



Phone Ahead: J22-I3ZI 



Monday through ^rida) 



Artists Unlimited 
trip 'a success' 

Thirty-eight students went on the 
trip to the Metropolitan Museum of 
Art in New York City, which was 
sponsored by Artists Unlimited on 
Oct. 17. 

The trip was entertaining as well 
as educational, said George E. Boud- 
man, president of the club. 

After the tour of the museum, 
students had time to tour the city. 

mi 

!^^ Buy One PIZZA 

Get One FREE! I 



[_ (^MmB^mmW^^_^ 



The second annual Boss's Night 
and Pace Awards Dinner will be held 
next Thursday, Nov. 8, in the King's 
Inn in South Williamsport. 

The Classified Club each year 
holds a boss's night to which each Col- 
lege classified employee invites his or 
her boss to dinner. The club holds lun- 
cheons every two months. 

To go with Boss's Night, Dr. 
Robert L. Breuder, College president, 
initiated the Performance Award for 
Classified Employees (the PACE 
Award). 

Administrators may nominate a 
classified employee for the award. 

Committee members for this 
year's Boss's Night are Marian 
Blackburn, Margaret Karaffa, Arlende 
Warner, Judy Fink, and Judy Phillips. 




oobAcmSoooooo 



BENSON 



€f fit mini. ^ 
nntjnarket 



Coinei ol 3icl and Maynard Sts 





«SS?SSS:SiSi3S!«:*v 



Special forums for students 

to learn about sponsorship 

set for today, tomorrow 



SWSffl%S«S:Wft¥:WS;W:?x::¥S:*¥!¥ 



wsiw-ssiRwasftwss 



'^ff^^^fTf 



^^ V' 'to IV- 

Spotlight 



Parfitt wins state cross country title 



By Rodney D. Hill 
SPOTLIGHT sports editor 

Wayne M. Parfitt, an auto body 
student from Pottsville. and Jennifer 
0. Kuyper, a retail management stu- 
dent from Troy, were favored to win 
the conference and state cross coun- 
try championships on Saturday, Oct. 
27 - and the final results were close 
to expectations: Parfitt did win top 
honors and Miss Kuyper finished in the 
runner-up spot. 

Parfitt ran his best race of the 
season as he finished 31 seconds ahead 
of the runn.er-ttp,,.4oe Poremb^ of 
Bucks County Community College. 
with a time of 27:03. 

Miss Kuyper was less fortunate as 
she came in 27 seconds behind first- 
place finisher Janice Upchurch, of the 
Philadelphia Community College, tim- 
ed at 20:59 of the race. 

Not 'greatest' conditions 

The conditions were not what 



10 children needed for performance 




Out in front... Wayne Parfitt 



Student forums 
in Auditorium 

Dean says 'College 
will not be closed' 

In another attempt to discuss 
and clarify information regarding 
the College's sponsorship situation, 
two days' worth of student forums 
will be held today and tomorrow in 
the Academic Center Auditorium, 
according to Dr. Miles Williams, 
dean of employee and community 
relations. 

The first forum will begin at 
3:30 p.m. today. Another two are 
scheduled for tomorrow - at 11 a.m. 
and at 6:30 p.m. 

The dean noted that Dr. Robert 
L. Breuder, College president, will 
be conducting the forums and mak- 
ing introductory remarks. 

Dr. Williams emphasized that 
"whatever you've [the students] 
have heard, under no circumstances 
will the College close" and that 
students arc to continue with their 
plans involving the College. 

He stressed that the issue was 
not if the College is going to be spon- 
sored, but by whom. 

The dean noted that the forums 
will last approximately 30 to 60 
minutes. 



Comic opera here Nov. 17; 
tickets at Recreation Center 
free to students before Nov. 10 



Women's Week date set; 
arts programs discussed 



By James K. Morrissey 
Of The SPOTLIGHT Staff 

The College's Special Events 
Commit'^ee will sponsor a performance 
of Gilbert and Sullivan's comic-opera, 
"H.M.S. Pinafore" at 4 p.m., Satur- 
day, Nov. 17, in the Academic Center 
Auditorium. The performance will be 
by the Camerata Opera Theater. 

According to Mrs. JoAnn R. 
Fremiotti, coordinator of intramural 
athletics and College activities, free 



Goal topped at Bloodmohile 

Late Report / See Also, Photo, Page 8 

The Bloodmobile collected 522 pints of blood from donors at its visit 
in the Gymnasium last Tuesday and Thursday. 

"This exceeded our expected total of 440 pints," said Mrs. JoAnn 
R. Fremiotti, coordinator-of intramural activities and College activities. 

"We had 149 first-time donors and 559 volunteers... thanks to 
everyone involved, the Bloodmobile was a big success!" she added. 



tickets are available to students, facul- 
ty, and staff of the College until this 
Saturday, Nov. 10 in the Recreation 
Center, Room A137, Lifelong Educa- 
tion Center. 

Validated ID needed 

Currently validated College ID 
cards must be shown to obtain free 
tickets, said Mrs. Fremiotti. 

Senior citizens and children under 
12 are also eligible for free tickets. 
turn to Page 7 



By Karen M. Metarko 
Of The SPOTLIGHT Staff 

In another Women's Week 
"brainstorming session last Wednes- 
day, members tentatively marked the 
starting date for the annual event as 
Sunday, April 14, according to Ms. 
Kathryn A. Ferrence, career develop- 
ment specialist and co-adviser of the 
Women's Forum, which sponsors 
Women's Week. 

At the hour-long meeting, discus- 
sion centered on making plans for the 
event to include a day-long crafts and 
demonstrations fair in the Susquehan- 
na Room and possibly with stands out- 
side the building if weather permits. 
Other plans include an art show, 
featuring food as an art; a fashion 
show with designs by two 
Williamsport women; a play focusing 
on women and written by a woman, 
and a concert by a women's wind 
ensemble from Harrisburg. 



Also discussed was renting a van 
during Women's Week to transport 
students from the North Campus in 
Wellsboro to the Main Campus to par- 
ticipate in the events and vice versa. 

The theme determined for the 
1985 Women's Week is "Women in 
the Arts". 

The next Women's Forum get- 
Please turn to Page 7 



PBL to hold 
bake sale Tuesday 

Phi Beta Lambda (PBL) 
will sponsor a bake sale tomor- 
row from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. in the 
lobby of the Academic Center, 
according to David E. Daven- 
port Jr., a business manage- 
ment student from South 
Williamsport. 



2 SPOTUGHT Monday, Not. 5, Ii84 



Commentary / Letters / Reviews 



Lots to bear in 

SPOTLIGHT 

commentary 

on improvements 

in handgun regulations 



mind when bearing arms College building 

aims to improve 




SGA speaks out: 
opposes commissioners' 
sponsorship rejection 

/Editor's Note. This teller was sent to 
the Lycoming County Commissioners 
as a representation of the Student 
Government Association senators who 
received opinions from the College 
students and their SGA senators I 



To SPOTLIGHT readers: 

The Student Govetnment Associa- 
tion of the Williamsport Area Communi- 
ty College, in the best intertest of the 
students, feels that the Lycoming Coun- 
ty Commissioners made a serious 
mistake in denying the College sponsor- 
ship proposal. 

The students of the College would 
like to see the commissioners recon- 
sider their decision 

The College offers outstanding 
training in curriculums not given at other 
colleges Many of the specialities offer 
employment in the following areas: 
timbering, service and operation of 
heavy equipment, agribusiness, avia- 
tion, and computer science. 

The education available in these 
curriculums, as in all curriculums at the 
College, is recognized nationwide. We 
students take pride knowing that we are 
participating in such a highly-acclaimed 
college. 

As a result of the commissioners' 
decision, the first-year students now at- 
tending the College have doubts about 
enrolling here lor another year. Also, 
prospective students wanting to attend 
the College may seek other colleges If 
this occurs, the county will lose valuable 
revenues which the students bring to 
the area. 

The students of the College leel 
that the county commissioners decision 
will grievously hinder the College's 
future - which is to educate students 
and Its citizens for a lifetime commit- 
ment to this community, 

Steven D. Metzker, 

president, SGA 

Samuel A. Mundis, 

vice president, SGA 



A handgun is sold in the United States every 1 3 seconds, adding two million 
guns a year to the nation's estimated arsenal of 55 million automatics and 

revolvers, according to a national magazine. People have to judge from their 

Presently, there are approximately 25,000 gun regulations - mostly at the own point of view as to how "lavish- 
slate and local levels However, these are useless. The fact that the use of hand- the new construction of buildings and 
guns IS responsible for half the murders proves this statement ,he new landscaping at the College are. 

Higher quality control considered ^esN construction is being done to im- 

There have been many approaches to gun legislation, but perhaps New York prove the appearance of the campus 
has the most efficient approach In that state, a gun purchaser must pass a and to replace outdated buildings that 
background check (possible criminal records, personal history! and complete a vvere too small to accommodate 
marksmanship course before obtaining a permit to carry a gun students and inappropriate for 

The possibility of administering a psychological test to the purchaser of a classroom use 
gun would also be beneficial Refurbishing old buildings is more 

'^''°'"'''"«"' "°t ^"swer costly than replacing with new ones. 

Many pro-gun control activists push for banning the sale of handguns This This is why the choice is made to start 
scheme will not work if nearby communities do not ban them also. Mark David vvith new construction 
Chapman brought a legally-purchased gun all the way from hawaii to kill Jon Len- state and federal funds are approv- 

non in Manhattan, New York, Besides that, ,t would be years before the black ed for construction of new buildings on 
market availability could be restricted ^^^^^^ „ ,^,^3^ 3^„^^,3 ^J ,„„ 

Markmanship, tougher rules needed lavish, the College would not get the ap- 

r,f J,Ll '^T"^ I ""'"^ °' '^""^ P^°P'^ '^'^° ''^^ ^ 9"" ^= ^ '"^^"^ P^o^al '0 construct these buildings. The 

of self-defense never learn how to use the weapon properly. If the ability to pass College would have to submit another 
a marksmanship course were required to purchase a gun, there would be fewer plan for construction 
accidental murders and injuries. c 1 .u u ■ 

i„ .k„ 11 . ^ c. ..... u „ -, ^i" example, this resubmission 

cJ^, 1 I . f ' '""'V f^'^""^ ^^ """"^^'^ ^°' ^"^'^ '°°'°°° P«°P'« was what happened in the construction 

Countries like Japan, with a 1.6 murder rate, as well as Britain and West Ger- of the Building Trades Center - not 
many, with 1 .3 rates, have tough restrictions. Maybe we should try it. because the plans were too lavish. The 

reason was: The building was going to 
be too basic. Changes were made to 
the building to create a campus-like ap- 
pearance; the same has been done with 
all of the other campus buildings. 

The College is not trying to become 
a university, but wants to attract new 
students and to have a pleasant at- 
, - mosphere for the College students, 

lEditor s Note: From My Desk is a feature intended to permit staff members to employees, and the community 
make individual comment on subjects of particular interest to them Opinion is 

solely that of the writer J JhSPk yOU, Mr. Murphy! 

While readers may not have notic- 
ed, the SPOTLIGHT has had had equip- 
ment problems 

That we were able to continue 
without interruption is due in large part 
to the help of Patrick D Murphy, assis- 



From My Desk... 

Twain's spook story 
carries weight 
in sponsor issue 



you, Mr Murphy! 

SPOTLIGHT 
Monday, Nov. 5, 1984 Vol. 20, No. 12 

The SPOTLIGHT is published each lulonday 
morning of the academic year, except for College 
vacations, by journalism and other interested 
students o( The Williamsport Area Community 
Dffice Room 7, Academic Center 1005 
W Third St. Williamsport, Pa 17701 
Telephone 17171 326-3761 



s expressed a 



By Sandra R. Taylor 
Of The SPOTLIGHT Staff 

Mark Twain came to Williamsport for a lecture visit in 1869. The visit gave 
birth to a dream The dream became a story. Locally, it is known as "What the 
Pine Street Spook told Mark Twain". 

The Williamsport Area Community College is a part of Lycoming County's '^"' P'°fessor of advertising art. 
heritage. In Twain's story, he gave an analogy of the descendants of Williamsport ^^ ^'^ greatly in his debt. Thank 

Skeleton rattles 

Tyvain described a skeleton who came and sat next to him and explained 
the way he felt about the deterioration of Williamsport's heritage 

"I was in a good neighborhood, for all the dead people that lived near me 
belonged to the best families in the city. Our posterity appeared to think the world 
of us They kept our graces in the very best condition, the fences were always 
in faultless repair, headboards were always kept whitewashed and replaced " 

The skeleton added, "but that day is gone by . . our descendants have forgot- 
ten us. My grandson lives in a stately house built with money made by these old 

mvlhrn hT K^'^H ' '""'' '" t™9'^<='^<^ S^^^" ^ith invading vermin that gnaws newspape, or of those whose n 

my shroud to build nests Wlthall" items Opinions do not rellect offic 

He concluded with "While our descendants are living around us in the city "'^ '"stnution. 

we have to fight hard to keep skull and bones together". ' ' 

c;„ ,„„ H .h r ,1 u "^°"*^*' '°° Do""^ 1^ Bar, 

t.0, too, does the College have to fight to keep the school from deteriora- Meiaiko, ednon^. „„ , 

tion. It must fight to keep the doors open It stands the chance of being abandon- p'^°'°9"'p''v editor; lyiark s-Schwanke, ad 
ed by the same people who fought to make it a college. And now, the institu- '""'■""•"- """ ■"■'"• ■™"' " "--""■ 
tion s heritage may be gone forever. 

First the College's sponsoring school districts pulled out and now the county 
commissioners neglect its needs. 

Will Twain's analogy of Williamsport's people show through in the College 
sponsorship issue? Are the commissioners the kind of descendants that Twain 
was inspired to write about? 

Notice: To any art students seeking a medium to publicly display their work 
and begin a portfolio for the future, the editorial page editor is seeking artists for 
work on the editorial page Those interested may contact the editor in the 
SPOTLIGHT office. Room 7, Academic Center. 
::¥:m<SS:AWSSi«*%S¥i«4WffJA¥A::Si:¥SS:.-SW^^^^^ 



; those of the student 
I opinion of 



STAFF 

managing editor, Karen fyl 
page editor. Gisela D Grassley. 



affairs editor, James I 

student affairs editor; Kalhiyn |y1 Gilbert, adyer- 

tising manager. Rodney D Hill, sports editor; 

Richard E Kopp Jr , senior staff writer 

REPORTERS / STAFF ASSOCIATES 

Wanna F Brown, tylelanie S Callahan. 
Kathleen L Eiswert. George I Hawk. Robert W 
fylinier, Anne T Moratelli, Donald E IVIumford. 
Sandra L IVIusgrave, Sandra R Taylor, James E 
Treese, Jennifer S. White, LeRcy S Whitmire Jr , 
Canda fyl Zinck 

Faculty adyiser Anthony N Cillo 
Production Suit This lune 
James K fyloirissey, pioduclion supervisor; 
Kathryn M Gilbert, copy editor. Wanna F Brown, 
Kathleen L Eiswert, Sandra L fylusgrave, and 
Karen M Melarko. production assistants 



Integrated Studies 
director interviews 
to be scheduled 

By Donna M. Barnett 
Of The SPOTLIGHT Staff 

The search for a new director of 
the Integrated Studies Division is 
underway, according to Mrs. Veronica 
M. Muzic, acting director of the In- 
tegrated Studies Division. 

According to Mrs. Muzic, a divi- 
sion director search committee has 
been formed to interview chosen ap- 
pUcants for the job. 

Dr. Sweeney heads committee 

Dr. Richard M. Sweeney, pro- 
fessor of English, has been named 
chairperson of the committee. 

The committee is comprised of 
faculty and administration. Those ser- 
ving on the committee are Dr. Robert 
G. Bowers, executive assistant for in- 
ternal affairs; Mrs. Kathy S. Dumanis, 
instructor of economics; Roy P. Fon- 
taine, instructor of psychology; James 
E. Logue, associate professor of 
English; Dale A. Metzker, associate 
professor of graphic arts; Michael P. 
Nestarick, associate professor of 
mathematics, and James B. Shaw, 
assistant professor of physics. 

According to Dr. Sweeney, the 
group will begin working immediate- 
ly on filling the position. 

"We will be reading credentials [of 
the applicants] this week and deciding 
which people to invite for an inter- 
view," Dr. Sweeney said. 

Dr. Sweeney commented that in 
the process of choosing the potential 
interview-candidates, the committee • 
will take a checklist approach. 
Hopes to narrow down 

"We're going to have a checklist 
like we did with the communications 
position last year. Every person on the 
committee rates each applicant on a 
scaleof one tofive," Dr. Sweeney said. 
The aim is to narrow down the pool of 
26 applicants to four to 15 
interview-candidates. 

According to information provid- 
ed by Mrs. Muzic, the minimum 
qualifications for the position are: A 
master's degree in a subject related to 
integrated studies or education ad- 
ministration; competence in oral and 
written communication skills; three 
years of full-time teaching experience, 
preferably at a community college; 
evidence of management ability and 
leadership skills; sensitivity to expec- 
tations and needs of students, faculty 
staff, and advisory committee 
members. 

The starting date for the position 
is January 1985 or as soon thereafter 
as possible. The salary will depend 
upon the amount of education and ex- 
perience. The deadline for applications 
was last Friday. 



RING LOST 
Lost in Gym: One wedding ring 
of white gold and one class ring of 
silver for Middleburg High School. 
Both rings are a size 6. Please con- 
tact Rosetta Renninger or call col- 
lect, 694-3963. [advtj 



Student checks are at cashier's office 

Fall student award checks are available in the cashier's office. Room 106, 
Academic Center, according to information provided by Miss Janice A. Kuzio, 
assistant director of financial aid. 

Any student who has a PELL, PHEAA or SEGG grant for the Fall Semster 
should stop by the cashier's office to sign his or her check in order for his or 
her tuition to be officially paid for the Fall Semester. Any refunds due will be 
distributed at this time, according to Miss Kuzio. 

Students should stop by the cashier's office from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Those 
students who cannot be at the cashier's office between those hours may call 
the Financial Aid Office. A form will be mailed for these students to sign in 
order to have the check mailed to them. 

Any checks not picked up within 15 days after the end of the Fall Semester 
will be cancelled, according to Miss Kii7io. 




Donna M. Barnett, managing editor of the SPOTLIGHT, explains picas and 
columns to Ronald L. Bair, left, and Patrick L. Deitrick, of Montgomery 
Area High School, during recent visit by the two to the College. 

[SPOTLIGHT photo] 

Catering class winery trip 

good learning session: coordinator 



By Kathleen L. Eiswert 
Of The SPOTLIGHT Staff 

The College's catering classes had 
a "really nice" time on its field trip to 
Wickham and Wagner Wineries in 
New York last Tuesday, according to 
Mrs. Sue L. Bennett, coordinator of 
food services. 

Besides touring the wineries, the 
catering classes also viewed the 
vineyards. 

"We observed the whole process 
of making wine," she said and noted 
that the wines ranged from red to 
white and from sweet to dry. Ending 
the tour, they had an "elaborate" wine 
tasting session. 

To complete the trip, the students 
ate dinner at Pierce's Restaurant in 
Elmira, N.Y. and toured the wine 
cellar there. 

"We had a delightful meal," Mrs. 
Bennett commented. "We really en- 
joyed the aspect of people waiting on 



She continued, "We met the 
owner of the restaurant; he was very 
helpful in answering our questions." 

Mrs. Bennett also noted that for 
transportation, the catering class 
students had the first ride in the Col- 
lege's student activities' new van. 
"That was really nice for us also," she 
said. 



Hondty. Not. 5, 1984 SPOTLIGHT 3 

Le Juene Chef menu 
listed for this week 

Le Juene Chef is open for lunch 
from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. every Tuesday, 
Thursday, and Friday, and from 11:30 
a.m. to 1 p.m. on Wednesdays, with 
the menu selected by the student 
managers. Reservations are not re- 
quired. Soup and dessert each are a ta ' 
carte. 

Tuesday, Nov. 6 

Baked Limerick ham, sweet 
potatoes casserole, green beans almon- 
dine or maccodione of vegetables, cole 
slaw with carrots. Soup of the day is 
split pea. Desserts are lemon 
raspberry custards or pecan tarts. 
Thursday, Nov. 8 

Sweet and sour short ribs, potato 
salad, green bean casserole or eollard 
greens with bacon bits, cornbread. 
Soup of the day is cream of potato. 
Dessert is fresh irmiflambe. 
Friday, Nov. 9 

Baked island fish, baked potatoes, 
asparagus Hollandaise or marianated 
vegetables. Soup is cream of com and 
tomato. 

LeJuene Chef 
hours changed 

Due to the turnover of 
students involved in the quanti- 
ty foods production course, Le 
Juene Chef will be open from 
11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. only on 
Wednesdays beginning next 
week and continuing through the 
following week, according to 
Mrs. Judith M. Patschke, instruc- 
tor of quantity foods production 
services. 

Until Christmas, Tuesday 
and Thursday lunches will be a la 
carte and Wednesday menus will 
be chosen by student managers. 



Area nursing homes included 
in dietetic technician training 



To gain experience in their respec- 
tive fields, the dietetic technician 
students are currently involved in 
completing in-service training at 
Sycamore Manor, Leader North and 
South Nursing Homes, and the 

Phi Beta Lambda 
plans hayride 

Phi Beta Lambda (PBL) will spon- 
sor a hayride scheduled to begin at 6 
p.m. tomorrow at RD 3 (Box 228) in 
the Collinsville area, according to 
Jonathan F. Miller, a computer science 
student from Williamsport who is club 
president. 

The hayride is for members and 
guests of PBL. 

Any PBL member who wishes to 
attend the event and is not sure of the 
location may pick up a map in the PBL 
office located in the basement of the 
Academic Center, Miller said. 

Refreshments will be provided. 



Williamsport Home, according to Mrs. 
Vivian P. Moon, associate professor 
:and coordinator of the dietetic 
program. 

The technicians' functions include 
giving lectures on personal hygiene, 
hypertension, and therapeutic updates 
on bacterial concerns, and diets (both 
weight loss and mechanical soft). 

Their duties also cover working 
with patients, planning menus, and 
performing sanitation checks. 

Mrs. Moon said that the in-services 
are designed to update the staff on 
monthly topics in regard to the state 
laws. 

"The technicians gain experience 
in learning the material themselves," 
she said. 

ROOMMATES NEEDED 
Roommates needed for nice 
house, Brandon Park area. Two 
rooms available. Interested persons 
may call 323-1006 in the afternoons. 
[advtj 



College recruiter completes NYC Marathon, 
reflects on the run, the pain, and the joy 



By Rodney D. Hill 
SPOTLIGHT sports editor 

Dennis L. Dunkleberger, of Mun- 
cy and assistant director of admissions 
who is also a College recruiter, was 
one of five local entrants in the New 
York City Marathon. 

Dunkleberger also completed the 
26.2 miles on the day that was record- 
ed as the warmest Oct. 29 in local 
history. 

Entered in the marathon were 
18,365 people after 48,000 were turn- 
ed down. Of the initial entrants, only 
16,315 started the run while 14,213 
finished - which was quite surprising 
considering the heat and humidity. 
In top 20 percent 
Dunkleberger finished in a time of 
three hours, 46 minutes and 38 
seconds while placing 3,635th - which 
is about the top 20 percent. 

When Dunkleberger was asked 
about how he felt at the beginning of 
his first marathon, he said, "I was ex- 
cited and thrilled about what was 
ahead." 

Dunkleberger said the first three 
miles were slow because of the large 
crowd that was also running. He said 
he enjoyed the run even at the slow 



pace because the spectators who lined 
the streets were the most fantastic he 
had ever seen before. 

Could feel thickness 

Dunkleberger said his most 
serious running was the five to 18 mile 
mark and after that he could feel the 
thickness setting into his legs, causing 
them to become very heavy. 

"The only time I would walk... was 
around the 21-mile water stops and I 
would only walk a few seconds - long 








Dennis L. Dunkleberger 
...it was quite a run 



enough to drink the water," he said. 
He also mentioned that his legs were 
sore and tired at that point. 

He said that around the 22nd mile, 
the real mental battle was taking place 
because of the pain, of seeing the 
others walking, and because it was 
tough then to keep his mind on the 
run. 

Made up his mind 
He did keep his momentum going 
because, he said, "I made up my mind 
in June, when I started to train for the 
marathon: I was not going to walk or 
quit." 

Dunkleberger said the 25th mile 
was welcomed because of the shady 
areas and because of the realization 
that the finish was near. - 

"The spectators were also a 
reason for me wanting to finish the 
run... They not only wanted to see the 
favorites, but they were also rooting 
for the people who were not big names 
at the marathons," said Dunkleberger. 
"You just can explain what it was like 
until you've been there." 

Dunkleberger also noted that "it 
normally takes about one month to ful- 
. ly recuperate from a run like that, but 
Friday, I'm going to try some runn- 
ing " 



New intramural 
activities slated; 
gym open Sundays 

The Gymnasium will be open on 
Sundays, starting yesterday and con- 
tinuing on Nov. 11 and Nov, 18 from 
7 to 10 p.m., according to Glen I. 
Korobov, College evening activities 
assistant. 

Beginning today, there will no 
longer be an open gym on Tuesdays 
and Thursdays in the mornings, 
Korobov added. 

There will be a one-day-a-week 
open table tennis each Tuesday from 
3 to 4 p.m. on a first-come, first-served 
basis. Anyone interested should make 
reservations by going to Room A137, 
Lifelong Education Center, or by call- 
ing Ext. 412, with at least 24 hours ad- 
vance notice, Korobov said. 

On Saturday, Dec. 1, a pool tour- 
nament will be held in the Recreation 
Center, Room A136, LEC. Anyone in- 
terested may sign up now through 
Nov. 27 in the Recreation Center, 
Korobov added. 

There will be a basketball tourna- 
ment starting Tuesday, Nov. 27. In- 
terested persons should sign up in the 
Rec Center by Nov. 16. 



rp, CJ !• ^^■'^■■" "■^'^ (..enter by Nov. 16. 

ine Sidelines Pin Busters stay close to leaders 



Sports Comnientary 

By Rodney D. HiU 

SPOTLIGHT Sports Editor 




Recently there has been some 

criticism over the issue of football on tion, but as soon as you start to get in- 

television. to the program, the half hour is up. 

Earlier m the year, a court deci- I don't think any particular type of 

sion ruled in favor of more rights for program is too much, but 1 do think the 

television coverage of college games, selection is well distributed - especial- 



Prior to the decision, non- 
spectators of football seemed to be 
quite upset with the amount of football 
that had already been on television. 
Since more games are now being 
aired, the non-spectators are claiming 
that more "fuel" has been added to the 
fire. 

Some can't be pleased 

It would be nice if everybody could 
be pleased in their own way, but some 
people can't be pleased. Television 
seems to always be where the criticism 
is. The last major issue of television 
was the quality of programs aired and 
easily available to children. 

Over the last few weekends, I have 
taken notice of the number of football 
games which were televised. Consider- 
ing the total amount of hours in one 
week - which is 168 - and the number 
of hours with live coverage - which is 
approximately 15 hours a week - the 
issue of football being too plentiful is 
a little overexaggerated. 
Weekdays: Nothing but "soaps' 

If these same people would turn 
their televisions on during a weekday 
afternoon, they would find nothing but 
soap operas. 

The evenings are sitcoms which 
will occasionally attract your atten- 



ly with cable television these days. 
Not what everyone wants 
A good number of these "buffs" 
who do nothing but watch football are 
usually the people who work those 
hard, grueling hours at the local mill 
- and the games are nothing more 
than a conversation piece during their 
work-breaks. 

During the football season, there 
are games which not everyone can af- 
ford to attend. With television... it's 
one of the cheapest ways to grab a seat 
on the 50-yard line. The selection of 
games should also be plentiful, too, 
because not everyone is a Philadelphia 
Eagles fan and the annual Army-Navy 
game is not the game everybody is 
waiting for. 

Not as high as projected 
Personally, I don't think the 
numbers are as high as some people 
"project" them to be. And I also don't 
believe those people who follow profes- 
sional football are included in the au- 
dience of college football and vice 
versa. 

Regardless of the numbers, if a 
person wants to sit back for a few 
hours of enjoyment - or days for that 
matter - it's a decision that he or she 
has made and should be left at that. 



W.A.C.C. Five-0 has regained a 
one-game lead over the Pin Busters, 
but the Busters are keeping Five-O in 
their sights. 

The rest of the teams are hover- 
ing around the .500 areas, with the ex- 
ception of the Gutter Dusters, who are 
still looking for their first win. 
Team standings 

The team standings, with the first 
number fter the team name represen- 
ting wins and the second number 
representing losses, are: 

1. W.A.C.C. Five-O, 13, 5. 

2. Pin Busters, 12, 6. 

3. Scratch and Lucky Strikes, 10 
9. 

5. We Three, The Outlaws, and 
Dew Crew, 9, 9. 

8. Gutter Dusters, 0, 18. 

High team series 
1. Dew Crew, 1903; 2. Scratch, 



1828; 3. W.A.C.C. Five-O, 182, 
High team single 
1. Pin Busters, G89; 2. Dew Crew, 
642; 3. W.A.C.C, Five-O, 620. 
Men's high series 
1. Barry A. Honey, 

2. Christopher L. Patrick 

3. Richard W.Jackson, 548. 

Women's high series 
1. Denise M. McNeil, 397. 

Men's high single 

1. Barry A. Boney, 

3. Richard W. Jackson, 

3. Christopher L, Patrick, 213 

Women's high single 

1. Denise M. McNeil, 137. 

Top "5" averages 
1. Mark E. Reamsnyder, 
2. Scott R. Kehs, 190; 3. Richard W. 
Jackson, 182; 4. Rudy E. Long, 181; 
5. Christopher L. Patrick and Myles 
S. Murray, 16G. 



605; 
569; 



238; 



197; 



• • • Sports Schedule %%^ 
Intramural Sports • • • 
Men's Basketball \. , 

Tuesday: Knights vs. Yuk-A- ^^^ ^ Volleyball 

Roidz; Warriors vs. Bums, both games Monday: Winners' bracket cham- 
at 7 p.m.; G'town vs. Payton Gang, P'^^'^'P. ^ P-™.; Warriors vs. winner- 
The Freeze vs. Corrosion, both games ^°^ Wammers and Hummida Im- 
at 8 p.m. mida's. 8 p.m. 

Thursday: Knights vs. Corrosion Tuesday: Knights vs. Scumbuz- 

Warriors vs. Payton Gang, both games ^'""''^' * P'""- 

at 7 p.m.; G'town vs. Bums, The . *«<*"esday an^ Thursday will be 
Freeze vs. Yuk-A-Roidz, both games '''■'"'"ation games; both days, 7 p.m. 
at 8 p.m. Weight room 

Coed volleyball ™? '^fs^}: ''oo'" will be open 



p.m. 



Monday: Net Busters vs. X-T, 7 ""'"'^ "^"^ *""' Fridays from 4 p.m. to 



10 p.m. 



Tuesday: Game Two, Net Busters NEXT, PLEASE! 

^^' ^u' ^ ]'■'"' '^^^ things, in order, that people 

Ihursday: Game Three (if in Poland stand in line for are meat 

necessary), Net Busters vs. X-T, 7 cigarettes, washing powder, soap! 

''•'"■ toilet paper, eggs, alcohol, shampoo! 

mayonnaise— and everything else. 




Monday Nov 5 198-1 SPOTI IGHT 5 



The first women's cross country team at the College places third in both 
conference and state team competition. They are grouped at far right 

[SPOTLIGHT photo by Rodney D. Hill] 




Jenny O. Kuyper crosses the finish 
line for second place in both the con- 
ference and state championships in 
women's cross country 

[SPOTLIGHT pkoto by Rodney D 

mm 




^*''"4i^' 








Bradley I. Aldenb receives the sixth 
place stick after his five-mile run. He 
was the secondplace finisher for the 
Williamsport men's team. 

[SPOTLIGHT photo by Rodney D 
Hill] 



•; <f '■ 



The men's cross country team of the College, grouped in the center, finish- 
ed second in the conference and third in the state team championships 

[SPOTLIGHT photo by Rodney D Hill 



Parfitt wins 

■■■ Continued from Page I 

most runners would call the most 

desireable. because the day was very 

warm and humid for a late October 

day. 

Although the conditions were not 
in favor of the runners, the race itself 
was run as though the conditions were 
those of an ideal day to run. 

The Williamsport Area Communi- 
ty College finished second to Bucks 
County Community College in men's 
competition for the conference title 
and third behind Butler and Bucks 
County Community Colleges for the 
state title. 

In women's competition, 
Williamsport finished third behind 
Luzerne County and Montgomery 
County Community Colleges in both 
conference and state competition. 
The other runners of the men's 



team are Bradley I. Alden, an aviation 
student from Tunkhannock, who 
finished sixth with a time of 28:02; 
Warren Renninger, a nursery manage- 
ment student from Williamsport, 14th 
place with a time of 30:20; Gregory S. 
Lange. an accounting student from 
Lock Haven, 23rd, timed at 32:03, and 
William E. Riggs Jr., an electronics 
technology student from Canton, 
finished 35th, with a 36:24 timing. 

Completing the women's field of 
runners: Dark J, Beahm, an accoun- 
ting student from Mill Hall, 11th, with 
a time of 24:52; Donna L. Eriston, a 
general studies student from Danville, 
16th, timed at 28:17; Stephanie M. 
McPeak, a general studies student 
from Centralia, 19th, with a time of 
28:45, and Connie L. Klees, an adver- 
tising art student from Montoursville, 
finished 20th, with a timing of 29:45. 



OH, FOR $1 MILLION! 

Some of the things people would 
do, according to a magazine survey, 
for $1 million are ... moving to a 
foreign country, taking a job they 
didn't like, stealing something, and 
divorcing the spouse. 



NO, THANKS... 

Six unusual cocktails, from a 
bartender in Wisconsin are: Couvoiser 
and Coke, peppermin Schnapps and 
Coke, gin and root beer, Amaretto and 
Tab, scotch and Kaluha. and Chivas 
and grape Tang. 



JOE MIGNANO'S SUB SHOP 

CORNER OF 2nd & MAYNARD 

PHONE 323-7443 

One Block from W.A.C.C. 

^ ,, ^ . , Monday Regular Sub Whole $1.60 

Daily t^peCialS, Tuesday Meatball Whole $1.75 

Wednesday Turkey Whole $1.40 

Thursday Ham Whole $1.80 

Friday Tuna Whole $1.70 

Saturday CheeseSteak Whole $2.50 
Hours: Mon-Sat 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. Closed Sun. 



6 SPOTLIGHT Mon<U;, Nov. 5, 1984 



Forest technology students win 
woodsmen's competition, 43-40 



Courtesy College Informatum Office 
Students of the College Forest 
Technicians Association hosted the 
Pennsylvania State University 
forestry students (from the State Col- 
lege campus) in a recent woodsmen's 
event. 

The Community College's forest 
technology students won, 43-40, in 
overall points, leading in such contests 
as pulp toss, chain sawing, bolt split- 
ting, and speed chop, among others. 
About 30 take part 

Close to 30 students from the two 
institutions participated in the event 
held at the Natural Resources Manage- 
ment Campus near Allenwood. 

Individual Community College 
winners were: 

Tracee L. Freeman, of Schuylkill 
Haven and a graduate of Schuylkill 

Students to attend 
New York City 
restaurant show 

The food and hospitality and 
dietetic technician students will be cat- 
ching up on the latest restaurant 
developments at the National 
Restaurant Association Show to be 
held next Monday in New York City, 
according to Mrs. Sue L. Bennett, 
coordinator of food services. 

According to Mrs. Bennett, dif- 
ferent companies unite to exhibit new 
items on the market. The students will 
also observe cooking equipment and 
visit demonstration booths. In addi- 
tion, literature and recipes will be 
available. 

After the show, the students will 
dine in various cuisine restaurants, she 
said. 

No crossword puzzle; 

new series begins 

later this month 

Because the SPOTLIGHT will 
soon be starting a new series of 
crossword puzzles, no crossword puz- 
zle appears in today's newspaper. 

A new series alternating 
crossword puzzles with other word 
puzzle challenges will be started later 
this month, according to Anthony N. 
Cillo, faculty adviser to the newspaper. 

^^^^ Buy One pizza 
Get One FREE! 



Haven Area School District, first in 
bolt split, second in dot split, crosscut, 
and axe throw. 

James A. Welfley, of State College 
and a graduate of the State College 
Area School District, second in water 
boiling and log roll and third in axe 
throw. 

Russell L. Lucas, of Sigel RD 1 
and a graduate of Brookville Area 
School District, first in speed chop and 
second in twitching and bow saw. 
From Ranshaw 
Francis G. Vinitski, of Ranshaw 
and a graduate of the Shamokin Area 
School District, second in pulp toss for 
distance. 

Larry L. Heiser Jr., of Selinsgrove 
RD 3 and a graduate of the Selin- 
sgrove Area School District, first in 
pulp toss for accuracy, second in twit- 
ching, chain throwing, and log roll, and 
third in bolt split. 

Mark L. Blackwell, of 
Williamsport and a graduate of, the 
Williamsport Area School District, 
first in pulp toss for accuracy, second 
in crosscut and water boiling, and third 



in pulp toss for distance. 
From Knoxville 

Michael J. Weidman, of Knoxville 
RD 1 and a graduate of the Northern 
Tioga School District, first in pulp toss 
for accuracy and pulp toss for distance, 
second in bow saw and chainsawing. 

Wayne A. Burke, of Plymouth and 
a graduate of Wyoming Valley West 
School District, first in pulp toss for ac- 
curacy, second in bow saw, log roll, 
twitching, and crosscut. 

Zane D. Williams, of York and a 
graduate of Central York School 
District, second in crosscut. 

Sean M. Williamson, of Grove Ci- 
ty and a graduate of Grove City Area 
School District, first in chain sawing, 
and second in twitching. 

Andrew J. Garman, of Blain RD 1 
and a graduate of the West Perry 
School District, first place in pulp toss 
for accuracy. 

Eugene R. Stroup, of Richfield RD 
1 and graduate of Juniata County 
School District, second place in 
crosscut. 




{^ (l)Mlg@^5Sllfea J 



MEMBERS of Phi Beta Lambda (PBL) who attended the Eastern Regional 
National Fall leadership Conference in Stamford, Conn, are (front, from 
left] Shcryl L. Wilkins, secretarial science student from Lawrenceville; 
Jonathan F. Miller, computer science student from Williamsport who is 
club president; Myra Sindlinger, business management student from Liber- 
ty; (middle row( Britt 0. Stock, an accounting student from Liberty; Judy 
L. Brokaw, computer science student from Canton; (back row( David E. 
Davenport Jr., business management student from South Williamsport, and 
Paul W. Goldfeder, adviser of the club. Not pictured is Sheridan T. (Ted) 
Haines, computer science student from Flemington. [SPOTLIGHT photo] 

Disc jockey team to entertain 
at dance at North Campus 

White Lightning II, a two-man disc jockey team from Westfield, 
will provide music and entertainment for the Friday, Nov. 9, disco dance 
at the North Campus student lounge. 

According to Mrs. Linda D. Cheyney, secretary to the director of 
the North Campus in Wellsboro, the DJ's are also students at the cam- 
pus. They are Joe Walters, in general studies, and Kevin Walters, in 
computer science. 

She noted that the admission fees for the 9 p.m. to 1 a.m. event 
will be $2 per individual and $3 per couple. All proceeds will go to the 
campus library. j. 



Area nursing homes 
included in dietetic 
technician training 

To gain experience in their respec- 
tive fields, the dietetic technician 
students are currently involved in 
completing in-service training at 
Sycamore Manor, Leader North and 
South Nursing Homes, and the 
Williamsport Home, according to Mrs. 
Vivian P. Moon, associate professor 
and coordinator of the dietetic 
program. 

The technicians' functions include 
giving lectures on personal hygiene, 
hypertension, and therapeutic updates 
on bacterial concerns, and diets (both 
weight loss and mechanical soft). 

Their duties also cover working 
with patients, planning menus, and 
performing sanitation checks. 

Mrs. Moon said that the in-services 
are designed to update the staff on 
monthly topics in regard to the state 
laws. 

"The technicians gain experience 
in learning the material themselves," 
she said. 

Seven from PBL 
attend conference 

Seven members of Phi Beta Lamb- 
da and their faculty adviser attended 
the Eastern Region National Fall 
Leadership Conference in the Stam- 
ford Plaza Hotel, Stamford, Conn., 
Oct. 26 through Oct. 28, according to 
Jonathan F. Miller, club president and 
computer science student from 
Williamsport. 

On Friday, a general session was 
held to allow the students to meet and, 
orient themselves for the weekend 
plans. 

Seminars were held all day Satur- 
day and Sunday on such topics as 
"Dress for Success", "Interpersonal 
Relations", "Resume Writing", 
"Parliamentary Procedure", and the 
"National Overview, Inside and Out", 
said Miller, 

Miller said the conference was 
"very interesting" and that he learn- 
ed some new techniques in leadership. 



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Less. 



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Rock i Roll 



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PBL chapters 
set dinner-dance 

An inter-chapter dinner dance will 
be held at the Sheraton Inn in 
downtown Williamsport at 6 p.m. 
Saturday for Phi Beta Lambda 
chapters, according to Jonathan F. 
Miller, club president and a computer 
science student from Williamsport. 

The intent of the dinner-dance is 
to bring the Pennsylvania chapters of 
PBL closer together, Miller said. 

The event is being sponsored by 
the PBL chapters of Bloomsburg and 
Mansfield Universities. 

Williamsport was selected because 
of its central location, Miller said. 

A social hour will begin at 6 p.m. 
Dinner will be served at 7;30 p.m. The 
meal will consist of a choice of roast 
beef, chicken or ham along with a 
salad, roll, vegetable, and dessert. 

Dancing will continue until 2 a.m. 
A disc jockey will provide the music. 

Comic opera 

Continued from Page 1 

There is a limit of two free tickets per 

person. 

Tickets for the public are $3. 
"They will be sold or distributed on a 
first-come, first-served basis," said the 
coordinator. 

Children wanted 

The Camerata Opera Theater is 
also seeking 10 children - from 6 to 12 
years old - to participate in the 
performance. 

Mrs. Fremiotti noted that the 
children must be available for rehear- 
sal at 1:30 p.m. on the performance 
date. 

"The children have non-speaking 
parts and do not have to learn any 
lines. Their stage clothes will be jeans, 
white shirts, and sneakers. They must 
also enjoy being on stage and be able 
to cHmb a 10-foot ladder," Mrs. 
Fremiotti said. 

Anyone wishing to help may call 
College Ext. 269, she said. 

For ticket information, however, 
calls should be directed to College Ext. 
412, she said. 




Hotdogs selling like hotcakes? Seemed like it at the recent Artists Unlimited 
fund-raiser hot dog sale. Serving the "world famous" doggies are Brenda 
M. Helminiak, of Williamsport, and Carla J. Stahl, of Mifflinburg. Both 
are advertising art students. Helping is Donna R. Naugle, accounting stu- 
dent from Jersey Shore. [SPOTLIGHT photo] 

Women's Week date set 

Continued from Page 1 
together will be an informal coffee 
tonight in the LeJeune Chef 
restaurant, adjacent to the Susquehan- 
na Room in the Lifelong Education 
Center. 

Ms. Ferrence noted that persons 
may drop in between 6:30 and 8:30 
p.m. and information will be available 
about the Forum. 

The purpose of holding an evemng 



session, she said, is to increase 
membership and to provide a time to 
meet for those who have not been able 
to attend the planning sessions which 
have been held during the day. 

Additional information about the 
Women's Week or the Women's 
Forum is available from Ms. Ferrence 
at College Ext. 398 or in the Counsel- 
ing and Career Development Office in 
the Learning Resources Center. 




Mums the word — proves Bruce A. Ronz, nursery management student from 
Wilkes Barre and Horticulture Club member, while trying to sell mums to 
Holly A. Rohrer, dental hygiene student from Erie. [SPOTLIGHT photo 



• KENWOOD • MIRAGE • JBL • SHERWOOD 
Z , 



Mond«y, Nov. 5, 1984 SPOTLIGHT 7 

Time sheets due 
Fridays: reminder 
from financial aid 

College work study students and 
their supervisors are being reminded 
that time sheets are due in the Finan- 
cial Aid Office on Fridays, according 
to information provided by Miss Janice 
A. Kuzio, assistant director of finan- 
cial aid. 

The time sheets will be accepted 
until Monday at 10:30 a.m. if a pro- 
blem arises that prevents the sheets 
from being in on time, the announce- 
ment said. 

But, if time sheets are placed in 
College interdepartmental mail in- 
stead of being delivered personally, a 
delay may occur and paychecks could 
be two weeks late. 

PBL asked to help 
Lung Association 

The West Branch Division of the 
Central Pennsylvania Lung and 
Health Association has asked the Col- 
lege's Phi Beta Lambda (PBL) to 
volunteer their services to collect 
donations, according to Jonathan F.' 
Miller, computer science student and 
club president from Williamsport. 

PBL members have been asked to 
staff a tree to be set up in the center 
court of the Lycoming Mall on Nov. 20. 
They will ask for monetary donations 
and then give the donor a token 
snowman to place on the tree to repre- 
sent the donation. 

Contributors may write their 
names on the token snowman. Miller 
noted. 

Any size donation will be accepted. 
Checks will be accepted also. All dona- 
tions are tax deductible and a receipt 
will be available upon request. Miller 
said. 

The money collected will go 
toward various Lung Association pro- 
grams such as smoking education in 
local schools, asthma workshops, and 
family asthma programs. 

The activity is also sponsored in 
part by WWPA radio station and by 
Lycoming Mall, Miller said. 




KENWOOD 

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INTRACLEAN • KENWOOD • MIRAGE • 



BENSON 



OffI mini, 
/9Mn market 



Corner of Srd and Maynard Sts. 



Always Open: 
All Night 
Sundays 
and Holidays 




A/ier siudyin^ hard for 
a lesl, h/;i noi stop b\ 
and pick up a snack^ 



8 SPOTLIGHT Monday, Nov. 5, I98< 

BULLETIN BOARD 

For the week of Monday, Nov. 5 through Friday, Nov. 9 
MOVIE 
"Scarfttce"... 7:30 this evening. Academic Center Auditorium, admission $1 
with College ID and $2 to all others. 

MEETINGS 
Multi-Cultural Society... noon today, Room 157. Learning Resources Center. 
Women's Forum... coffee meeting, 6:30 to 9 p.m. tonight, Le Jeuene Chef 
restaurant. Lifelong Education Center. 

Student Government Association... 6 p.m., tomorrow. Tuesday, Nov. 6, Room 
B107, Building Trades Center. 

Alpha Omega Fellowship... 7 to 10 p.m., tomorrow, Tuesday, Nov. 6, Room 
227, Academic ('enter. 

Phi Beta Lambda... 3:1.'} p.m., tomorrow, Tuesday, Nov. 6, Room 329, 
Academic Center. 

BAKE SALE 
Phi Beta Lambda... sponsoring bake sale from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., tomorrow, 
Tuesday, Nov. 6, Academic Center lobby. 
RAFFLE 
Gamma Epsilon Tau... continuing through next Tuesday, Nov. 13. Tickets 
may be purchased from members at a cost of 50 cents per ticket or three 
tickets for $1. First prize is a Cabbage Patch doll and second prize is a Trivial 
Pursuit board game. 

SPECIAL ACTIVITIES 
Rollerskating... 8 p.m. to midnight this Thursday, Nov. 8, at Skating Plus. 
$2 admission or free to faculty, staff, and students with validated College iden- 
tification. Skate rentals, 75 cents. Sponsored by the Student Government 
Association. 

PHE AA requirements for aid reviewed . 

PHEAA regulations require students to complete at least 24 credits per 
academic year in order to maintain eligibility for grant aid. according to infor- 
mation provided by Miss Janice A. Kuzio, assistant director of financial aid. 

Students with developmental courses must have at least 21 credits of non- 
developmental courses, she said. 

Eligibility for PHEAA grants for 1985-1986 could be impacted not only 
by the number of credits taken, but also by the number of credits incompleted, 
according to Miss Kuzio. 

She said students with questions about the PHEAA regulations should con- 
tact the Financial Aid Office in the Academic Center, College Ext. 241. 




•VAMPIRE' Annette D. Milheim, secondary student from South 
Williamsport, and Joseph J. Cammisa. graphic arts student from Hazleton, 
donate blood with assistance of Esther L. Wheeler, of the Red Cross staff, 
during last week's Bloodmobile visit at the College. /SPOTLIGHT photo fry 
Gisela D. Grasaleyj 

Secondary students give assistance 
during Bloodmobile visit on Main Campus 

Secondary education students gave a helping hand during the Bloodmobile 
visit last Tuesday and Wednesday, according to Ms. Janet A. Barbour, instructor 
of health occupations. 

There were 14 students assisting on Tuesday and 20 students assisting on 
Wednesday. 

Students took temperatures, took pulses, filled out necessary forms, worked 
on the canteen, carried blood bags to the storage coolers, and walked donors 
from the stretchers to the canteen. 

Ms. Barbour helped in organization and was assisted in that by Annette 
D. Milheim, health occupations student from South Williamsport. 

The Bloodmobile program is conducted by the American Red Cross. 



CILLO'S COLLEGE CORNER 

We'll prepare your favorite Subs and Burgers the way 
you like them! 

Play LUCKY NUMBERS and win a half sub plus a medium 
drink. Four winners every week! 



Cillo's College Corner 

1 100 W, Third St.. Williamsport 

(Next to Academic Centerl Phone Ahead: 322-1321 

Hours: 7:30 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. Monday through Friday 



IF YOU V\/ANT TO USE DRUGS, 

THAT'S YOUR BUSINESS! 

IF YOU V\/ANT TO STOP, 

THAT'S OURS! 

THERE IS HELP... 

NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS 

MEETING 

This Wednesday, Nov. 7 

7 P.M. 

Room 118, Building Trades Center 




iU 



Tonight 7:30 p.m. ^^ (with ID) 
ACC Auditorium $ 2 (without ID) 




If looks coDid kill... 

The glare of this cow was 
SPOTLIGHT photographer Richard 
E. Kopp Jr's first sight on the Danville 
State Farm. 

For more pictures, see pages 4 and 
5. 



New York City 

bus trip "booked up" 

Two bus trips to New York City on 
Saturday Dec. 1 and Saturday Dec. 8, 
sponsored by the Intramural Athletics 
and College Activities Office are "all 
booked up", according to Mrs. 
Maryann Breon, secretary to the 
coordinator of intramural athletics and 
College activities. 

"We are still taking the names 
down of anyone who would Uke to go as 
there may be people deciding to cancel 
their reservations for whatever reason," 
said Mrs. Breon. 

Anyone wishing to make a reserva- 
tion or requiring further information 
about the excursions may call College 
Ext. 269. 



Le Juene Chef lunch 
schedule changed 
open Wednesdays 

Due to the turnover of 
students in the Secondary Educa- 
tion program, Le Juene Chef will 
not be serving lunch on Tuesdays, 
Thursdays and Fridays beginning 
this week. However, the 
restaurant will be open for lunch 
from 11:30 to 1 p.m. on 
Wednesdays, according to Mrs. 
Judith M. Patsche, instructor of 
quantity food production services. 

Beginning Nov. 27, the 
restaurant will be serving lunch on 
Tuesdays, Wednesdays and 
Thursdays, but will be closed 
Fridays lutil further notice. 




Spotlight 



Monday, NovemlKr 12, 1984 • Vol. 20, No. 13 • 8 Ptga 
Williimsport Area CommDnity College • Williamsport, Pa. 17701 

K^Three of College's classified staff honored at dinner Nov. 8 



Courtesy of College Information office 
Three members of the College staff 
were honored at the Second Annual 
Boss's Night and P.A.C.E. Awards din- 
ner on Thursday, Nov. 8 at the King's 
Motel in WiUiamsport. The three 
employees, all part of the College's 
Classified Staff (composed of clerical 
and support staff) were presented with 
Performance Awards for Classified 
Employees (P.A.C.E. Awards). 

Receiving plaques were Mrs. Linda 
Cheyney, secretary to the director of the 
North Campus of Covington; Mrs. 
Margaret L. Karaffa, secretary to the 



coordinator of specialized technical 
education and community-based pro- 
grams, of Williamsport, and Mrs. Clara 
L. Way, secretary to the director of per- 
sonnel services, of Jersey Shore. 

The staffers were chosen on the 
basis of job performance, their relation- 
ships with co-workers, their cooperative 
spirit toward students, co-workers and 
public, their willingness to take on new 
challenges and responsibilities and on 
the positive image of the College they 
are able to project to the public. 

Awardees were chosen after 
nominations were opened up to ad- 



ministrative professional and technical 
staff. 

The College president, Dr. Robert 
L- Breuder, awarded the plaques. 

No meal tonight 
in Le Juene Chef 

Because of a Hotel and Restaurant 
show, there will not be a meal this even- 
ing in Le Juene Chef, according to Mrs. 
Vivian P. Moon, associate professor 
and coordinator of the dietetic program. 



Federal grant has been awarded 



Courtesy of College Information office 
A federal vocational education 
grant in the amount of $292,000 has 
been awarded to the College to enhance 
its Advanced Technology System in the 
Computer Labs in the Lifelong Educa- 
tion Center (LEC). 

The new equipment is necessary to 
insure that students can meet the 
heightened employment criteria of area 
employers who are utilizing advance 
technology to achieve economic vitality. 
The grant is also important in that it 
will assist the College in completing the 
second phase of its comprehensive com- 
puter initiative by developing a local 
area network. The equipment being 
purchased through the grant will make 
it possible for the CADD Applications 
Laboratory, the Word Processing 
Laboratory, and the Graphic Arts 
Laboratory to utilize a common data 



The equipment will expose students 
to advanced technology equipment and 
introduce them to advanced concepts of 
data creation, management and utiliza- 
tion, increase training opportunities for 
business and industrial clients, offer ex- 
panded opportunities for developing 
computer literacy, and add computer 
support to Architiecture, Civil 
Engineering, Drafting, and Machine 
Tool Technology programs. 

Under the vocational education 
grant, 35 microcomputers and a new 
laboratory will be added. 

When this phase of the project is 
completed, the College will have 24 
microcomputers each in three labs. 
There are presently 40 microcomputers 
in two labs on the second floor of the 
LEC and a faculty terminal room hous- 
ing eight microcomputers an the first 
floor. The microcomputers are used to 
teach credit and non<redit courses for 



faculty, staff, and students, as well as 
clients form business and industry. 

The grant will also upgrade the 
main frame (the large computer sytem) 
which is housed in the LEC. 

The microcomputers will be linked 
to the mainframe thus allowing stations 
to be used as stand-alone personal com- 
puters or as remote terminals. By flipp- 
ing a switch and using the computer as a 
remote terminal, the user has virtually 
unlimited compute power and storage 
faciUties. 

With the new grant, the College 
will be able to run CAM (computer- 
aided machining sytem) and will be link- 
ing up numerical control machining 
equipment in the machine shop to the 
mainframe. 

Equipment purchased under the 
grant is expected to arrive in January 
1985 and to be implemented during the 
Winter months. 



Dr. Doyle attends seminar 
concerning British poverty 
Mondays in New York 

Dr. Daniel J. Doyle, professor of 
government, history, sociology and 
philosophy at the College earlier receiv- 
ed a fellowship for a seminar on Poverty 
and Society, which is conducted at the 
graduate school of the City University 
of New York, according to Dr. Doyle. 

Faculty from community colleges 
in New York, New Jersey, Connecticut 
and Pennsylvania are invited to attend 
the w i m iiw, ^rimMs M4 < 
day in New York City. 

Dr. Doyle commented that the 
seminar includes readings, discussions, 
and guest speakers on the concept of 
poverty in early industrial Britain. It 
also Includes individual research. 

Dr. Doyle is researching how major 
British newspapers of the 19th century 
handled the topic of poverty and to 
what degree they influenced public at- 
titudes. 

The College is not funding the 
money for his trips to New York City. 
"The Mellon Foundation is giving the 
College funds for the trip," said Dr. 
Doyle. 

Dr. Doyle also said he will be using 
his newly-acquired knowledge in 
teaching his classses here at the College. 
"Western Civ (civilization) classes willi 
be affected. 1 will also be using the in- 
formation in sociology class. If 1 had a' 
philosophy class, I would use it there 
also," Dr. Doyle said. 

The seminar requires Dr. Doyle to 
travel from his home in Muncy to New 
York City every week. "I usually leave 
Sunday evenings and return late Mon- 
day," he said. 

Dr. Doyle, who received the 
Master Teacher Award this year, par-~ 
ticipated in eariier seminars dealing with 
the Victorian Era. 



The SPOTLIGHT staff would liKe 
to thank Dr. Richard Sweeney, 
professor of English, for his help 
while SPOTLIGHT'S adviser, An- 
thony N. Cillo is hospitalized. 
GET WELL SOON MR. CILLOI 



ZoSPOTUGHTOMoiidi)', Nomnbtr 12, 19M 



^ Commentary * Letters * Reviews * 



Baboon transplant 
was too chancy 

"Baby Fae", the month-old girl 
who received a baboon's heart In a 
transplant operation, performed at 
Loma Linda University Medical 
Center, In California, has been 
described as a "miracle 
breakthrough" In modern surgery. 
This might be the case except for a 
couDle of outstanding points. 

According to Dr. Paul W. 
Teraski of the UCLA Medical 
School, the heart of a two-month old 
baby became available for 
transplant the actual day of the 
operation. 

Also, out of the four animal-lo- 
human heart transplants performed 
in the past, only one recipient lived 
up to three and a half days after the 
operation. Hardly an optimistic in- 
dicator of "Baby Fae's" potential life 
span. 

Thus, an animal has been 
needlessly slaughtered for an ex- 
periment which has been proven un- 
successlu\ \n \he past Is this the 
"miracle breakthrough" the meCHcaf 
community Is talking about? 



Higher education study 
exemplifies coiiege inadequacies 

in a recent study, conducted by a seven-member panel of faculty and ad- 
ministration from colleges nationwide, it was pointed out that Inadequacies In col- 
lege education exist today. 

Titled "Involvement In Learning," the reports notes a lack of faculty commit- 
ment to currlculums that are loo vocational, students that want a bachelor's 
degree don't actually attain it, and students performance on graduate exams 
have declined between 1964 and 1984. especially In high verbal skills. 

Taking into consideration that the College Is not a four-year institution, in 
most cases the suggestions for improvement don't always apply. 

For instance, the report suggests that the best faculty members be "saved" 
to leach the incoming freshmen so they will remain interested and keep the 
enrollment. Here, the benefit of the two-year Institution Is that students are being 
provided with a high quality education on a one-to-one basis. Students are being 
exposed to an education that not only involves learning by memorization or 
theory, but are acquiring skills. The students are receiving "hands-on" ex- 
perience because they are "learning by doing". 

Another suggestion that was provided by the board was that graduates 
should be required to pass an examination In their major. The College, through 
their type of "learning by doing" Is in a sense giving an examination, and are con- 
stantly challenging and testing students daily through the skills they perform In 
their fields. 

Two committees set up by the College, to study the system of higher educa- 
tion here, are the Competency Based Education Committee and the Credltlals 
Task Force. They focus upon students and evaluate their skills. Such questions 
as "What should a degree Include?" and "What does a degree offer?" are being 
studied by these committes. 

A college education is a very valuable asset. A student must strive to 
achieve their goals, but they also need the institution they attend to strive also. 



Administration has shown no rationale 
by cutting inter-collegiate sports 



Letter to the Editor: 

I enjoy and look forward to 
reading the SPOTLIGHT each 
week and I am writing concerning 
an article about the Inter- 
collegiate sports program at the 



There seems to be a trend in 
our society today, which takes 
our rights, freedoms, and 
privileges that we enjoy, away 
from us, and then we must justify 
to the people who look them why 
we should have them. 

An example of this was in 
the Oct. 22 edition of your paper, 
in which Rodney G. Hurley, in- 
terim dean of student services, 
staled, "It you came forward with 
a good rationale from a represen- 
tative body and really substan- 
tiated why you want Inler- 
collegiate athletics, that would 
get a loi more attention (from the 
College administration)." 

I say, let the adminlstrallon 
come forward with a rationale 
and substantiated reason why 
they dropped Inter-collegiate 
athletics. 



Memo gave notice 

The person who recom- 
mended Ihe elimination of inter- 
collegiate athletics is no longer 
with us (Dr. Charles Cunning, 
who was Ihe dean of student ser- 
vices). This was one of the last 
acts he performed. He wrote a 
memo, in Aug. 7 of this year, to 
Harry SpechI, assistant professor 
of physical education, stating the 
following; 



Ttiis is to inform you that this 
is the last year the Coiiege will 
participate in intercollegiate 
athletics. 

In my opinion, you have ot- 
tered a quality program, 
however, Ihe lack ol spectator 
participation and broad-based en- 
thusiasm tor intercollegiate 
athletics clearly indicated the Col- 
lege should not continue this pro- 
gram. You must advise all 
coaches and athletes that inter- 
collegiate athletics will not be 
available during the 1985-86 
academic year. 



Is this really a valid rationale 
and substantiated reason? What 
can I say except that this ap- 
pears, from the administration's 
point of view, to be a cut-and-dry 
Issue. 

Sports instills pride 

It has been stated that 
teaching is the art of shaping 
lives. I believe that Inter- 
collegiate sports also helps to 
shape lives. It instills a sense of 
confidence and school pride to 
be chosen on a team that 
represents their coiiege. 
College profits from sports 

One benefit for the College is 
that it (intercollegiate sports) is a 
great marketing tool - an exam- 
ple of that being on the front page 
of the Sunday GRIT on Oct. 28, 
which included a color photo of 
Wayne M, Parfltt winning the 
state cross-country title. 

That photo would have 
never been there, if it were not for 
the College's inter-coileglate 
sports program. 

Carl M. Hlllyard 
Carpentry Instructor 



'Purple Rain' 

Song splashes of 
intense ennotion 

Music review 
by Kathleen L. Eiswert 

Songwriter Prince was reared by 
an alcoholic father and was a victim of 
child abuse. Now, with the realization 
of his father's problems, he uses the 
song "Purple Rain" as a dedication. 
The lyrics are laced with an understan- 
ding of his father's dejected life, but 
more Importantly, the song is aimed at 
the intent to forgive him for Prince's 
neglected childhood. 

This is expressed at the beginning 
of the song: "/ never meant to cause 
you any problems: I never meant to 
cause you any pain." 

Prince senses his father's unhap- 
piness and desires the opposite, by 
singing: "/ only want to see you one 
time laughing in the purple rain." 

Later in the recording, with the 
realization of his father's lonely and 
troublesome condition. Prince offers 
his aid: "/ only want to be some kind of 
friend." 

Next, Prince seems to urge his 
father not to brood on the past, but to 
strive for the future: "/ know times are 
changin'. It's time we all reached out 
for the new. That means you, too." 

"Purple Rain", unlike some of the 
hit songs today. Is well-written and 
easy to interpret. 



SPOTLIGHT 
Monday, Nov. 12, 1984 - Vol. 20, No. 13 

The SPOTLIGHT is published each Monday 
morning of the academic year, except for Col- 
lege vacations, by journalism and other in- 
terested students of The Williamsport Area Com- 
munity College 

Office: Room 7. Academic Center, 1005 
W Third St, Williamsport. Pa. 17701 
Telephone: (717) 326-3761. Extension 221 



Opinions expressed are those of the student 
newspaper or of those whose names accmpany 
items Opinions do not reflect official opinion of 
the Institution. 



THE STAFF 
Donna M. Barnett, Managing Editor.Karen M. 
Metarko. Edilorial Page Editor, Gise\a D. 
Qrassley, Photography Editor, Mark S. 
Schwanke. Administiafive Atlairs Editor, James 
K- Morrissey. Student Affairs f ci/rof. Kathryn M. 
Gilbert, Advertising Manager. Rodney D. Hill, 
Sports Ed/Ior. Richard E, Kopp Jr.. Sen/or Staff 

Writer, 

REPORTERS/STAFF ASSOCIATES 
Wanna F Brown, f^leianie S Callahan. 
Kathleen L. Eiswert, George I Hawk, Robert 
W ,fw1inier, Anne T, Morateiii, Donald E- twlum- 
ford. Sandra L, f^usgrave, Sandra R Taylor. 
James E Treese. Jennifer S, White, LeRoy S. 



Production staff this issue: Donna M Barnett, 
production supervisor and copy editor; Richard 
E Kopp Jr.. videocomposltion; Kathleen L, 
Eiswert and Sandra R. Taylor, production 
assistants. 




Whaddya 




SPOTLIGHTDMoQdit. Nowmber 12. IWinj 



Say ...? 





' ■ "If the country wants them there. 
It's not right if the country doesn't want 
us there " KImberly K. Thompson, a 

service and operation of heavy equip- 
ment student from Wiiliamsport. 



^. "Yes! I thinl< its good to gain aiiies, 
so if we ever had another war. we 
. could have other countries to help us 
out." Brian 0. Pauling, a business 
management student from Seiin- 
sgrove. 



5. "No, they should take care of their 
own Internal problems. We shouldn't 
force our philosophy on others." Sher- 
ran A. Andrus, a human services stu- 
dent from Wiiliamsport. 



/ . "No, I don't believe we have the 
right to force our opinion on others, but 
we should take steps necessary to pro- 
tect our interests." Curtis C. Krebs, a 
civil engineering student from 
Lewisburg. 



i^- "If the other countries don't care if 
■ we're there. I think its okay." Scott A. 
Burkhart, a computer science student 
from Ivluncy. 








9. 




>-'• "I think they should stay out of it 
and take care of your own, and let 
them work out their own first!" Bonnie 
S. Gehert, from Jersey Shore, 



^ ■ "I think its wrong mentally. If s the 
Imperialism. People should select their 
own government unless they are in- 
terfering with us. Nicaragua is wrong, 
because we're not directly involved. 
We shouldn't impose." Joan B. Qover, 
a food and hospitality student from Mlf- 
flinburg. 



O. "No! We don't have the right 
to decide who their for, or 
againsti" Russail D. Fry, a conn- 
puter science student from 
Wiiliamsport. 



O 

^- "No. We don't have the right to run 
another country." Shirley A. Correli, a 
food and hospitality student from 
Linden. 



1 U. "Definately, we definately don't 
need communism. If we put someone 
in, that will be one less country run by 
communism." JeHrey S. Racliau, a 
broadcasting student from Watson- 
town. 



Photos: Qiseia D. Qrssslay 

Text: Sandra R. Tayior 

Question: Does America have 
the right to intervene In other 
countries to set up a government 
favorable to us? Why or why not? 



4nSPOTllGHTnMoodiy, Notmber 12, 1M4 




The Danvil 



Photos by Richard E. Kopp Jr. 
Text by Donna M. Barnelt. 
Both of the SPOTLIGHT staff 




Since Fall semester, 1982, agribusiness and dairy herd management sindenis 
at the College obtain practical experience here, as part of their practicom. The 
agreement for College students to use the farm was finalized In July, 1982. 



The Danville State Farm is located 
in DanvUle, PA, near the State 
Hospital and is operated by the Depart- 
ment of Agriculture. At one time, the 
farm was operated by the Department 
of Welfare in cooperation with the 
Danville Slate Hospital. 




The crops that are raised are used 
to feed the livestock on the farm. 
"There are 200 livestock, counting the 
young," App said. 



The approximate 14 dairy herd management and 17 agribusiness students 
that help operate the farm on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays aren't involved 
with the harvest of the crops, according to Rus App, herdsman at the farm. 



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Alfalfa, com and orchard grass are raised on the 28S acre farm. Both the 
agribusiness and dairy herd management students learn to take soil samples, spray 
for weeks and study weed control. They also work with foliage and silage, accor- 
ding to App. 




Students who work at the farm learn various aspects of the agricultural 
worid. The students study feed formulas, and check the feed for nutrient con- 
tent. The students also learn to care for the livestock by learning how to give IVs 
(inlravenoos units), trim hooves and dehorn the animals. 



SPOniGHTDMondiy, Novembfr 12, I9IMd5 



le State Farm 




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"They'll (the students) also dissect a calf-it was jost born yesterday," App 
said. He stated that this endeavor is part of the students learning about the 
anatomy of liTeslock. 



John E. Homer, agribusiness student from Bellefonte displays the farm's 
new John Deere 4440 tractor. 




Some of the livestock on the farm is sold on the open market for public bid- 
ding," App said. 






"Those students that are interested also learn to pasteurize milk," App said. 
The milk collected at the farm is also pasteurized there, in the milkhouse behind 
the bam. Each student learns to test the milk supply for mastitis, by keeping a 
running five day record on their findinES. 



6DSP0TLICHTaM(mUT, Notunber 12, 19*4 




The Sidelines W.A.C.C. Five-0 extends lead 



Sports Commentary 

By Rodney D. Hill 

SPOTLIGHT Sports Editor 



*«V/«»'/ll«»/H«W/»<im I «)MU«,*»A/lU»kl/Mt»l **»/'! 




What would the world of sports be New York Giants were beatinE the 
like without the fan support? The fans Philadelphia Eagles by less than a 
make professional sports possible, and touchdown, with just a few seconds left 
they put the extra incentives in the on the clock the Giants fumbled and the 
game. Through the morale and the way Eagles scooped the fiimble up and 
The atmosphere is filled with joy and scored the winning touchdown in a freak 
excitement. Fans at the athletic events play that should have never happened, 
seem to have no worries and the worldly Fans al major events 

problems seem to have temporarily The fans are especially at their 

diminished. worst following a World Series win, or a 

If the games did not have the sup- Super Bowl victory. They are filled with 

port of fans, the contests would mean joy, but they get so carried away and 

nothing more than a sandlot game. they cause destruction, injuries, and in 

Fan allilude some cases even death, like in Detroit, 

I think the most enthusiastic fans with the last World Series, 
are the ones who gather at the college One of the things that is uncalled 
football games. Their altitudes are fairly for is the fan riding the referees for a 
the same between Ihem, because they all questionable call. The refs are as 
have the same thing in common, most human as anybody else in any given oc- 
of those fans belong to a fan club of the cupation and they do make mistakes, 
college they are attending or have al- The sad part is refs are being watched 
'""'s'' by a larger audience than people of 

The tailgating parties are one of the other professions, 
attractions that draw such large crowds Taking matters in their own hands 
at the college football games. If Another incident that took place 
anybody has ever been to a Penn State was in Pittsburgh when Dave Parker 
football game they could probably was playing right field. Parker was 
vouch to the excitement. playing under a fairly big contract and 

fan disgrace of events that particular year he was not playing 

Although the fans are a vital part as well as he had in previous years, 
of sports, a small number of fans play a some of the fans took the matter into 
major role in the disgrace of fans in their own hands and started throwing 
, various areas that have sporting events nuts and bolts at him, because he was 

When the fans run out onto the not earning the money, 
field after what seems to be a victory for The fans are spectators of the 
one team, but with remaining seconds athletic events and they should not play 
on the clock, the losing team is not any other part, especially judge the ex- 
given the "miracal" chance of puUing ecutioner. 
the victory out. A few years ago, the 



• •• 



Sports Schedule 
Intramural Sports 



• •• 



Men's Volleyball 

Monday: Purple Rehab vs. Wam- 
mers, Straub Greenies vs. Scumbuz- 
zards, 7 p.m. 

Wednesday: Tournament finals, 
Bums vs. winners of Monday's games, 7 
p.m. 

Thursday: Tournament final, if 
necessary, 7 p.m. 

Men's Basketball 

Tuesday: Knights vs. Payton 
Gang, Warriors vs. Corrosion, both 



gaines al 7 p.m.; G'town vs. Yuk-A- 
Roidz, Freeze vs. Bums, both games at 
8 p.m. 

Wednesday: Knights vs. Warriors, 
G'town vs. Yuk-A-Roidz, Freeze vs. 
Bums, both games at 8 p.m. 

Thursday: Bums vs. Corrosion, 
Yuk-A-Roidz vs. Payton Gang, both 
games at 7 p.m.. Knights vs. G'town, 
Warriors vs. The Freeze, both games at 
8 p.m. 



STUDY OUTDOORS! 

Al The Natural Resource College 
OWildlire Openlngi end Scholarships Available 

□ EnTironmentftl'Science ^ Natural Resources Administration 

^Fislieries & Aquatic Ecology QOutdoor Recreation 

□Conaervation Uw EnTorcenient ° Foreatry 



Njma 

Addreis. 



a m 85 D SEPT 85 
UNITY, MAINE 049B8 
(207) 948-3131 



W.A.C.C. Five-0 has widened 
their lead in the College bowling league, 
at ABC Lanes. The rest of the teams are 
still in the race, except for the Gutter 
Dusters who are being consistant in 
their own way, as they are still winless. 
Team Standings 
The team standings, with the first 
place number after the team name, 
representing wins and the second 
number representing losses, are: 

I. W.A.C.C. Five-0, 16, 5. 
2. Pin Busters, We Three and Dew 

Crew, 12, 9. 

5. The Outlaws, and Lucky Strikes, II, 

10. 

7. Scratch, 10, II. 

8. Gutter Dusters, 0, 21. 

High Team Series 

1. We Three, I9I7; 2. W.A.C.C. Five- 



0, 1800; 3. Outlaws, 1746. 
High Team Single 
1. We Three, 693; 2. Dew Crew, 647; 3. 
W.A.C.C. Five-0, 605. 
Men's High Series 
I. Scott R. Kehs, 611; 2. Mark E. 
Reamsnyder, 556; 3. James D. Red- 
mond, 495. 
Women's High Series 
1. Denise M. King, 451; 2. Denise M. 
McNeil, 361. 
Women's High Single 
I. Denise M. King, 169; 2. Denise M. 
McNeil, 127. 
Top "5" Averages 
I. Mark E. Reamsnyder, 193; 2. 
Richard W. Jackson, 182; 3. 
Christopher L. Patrick, 170; 4. Barry 
A. Boney, 168; 5. Scott R. Kehs, 165. 




Myles S. Murray, a constmction carpentry student of Grenoble N.J.; shows how 
he winds op his mnning form. (SPOTLIGHT photo by Richard E. Kopp Jr.) 

volleyball title X-T wins coed 



The coed volleyball championship 
was decided last Wednesday, Nov. 7 
with X-T winning the title, by defeating 
the Net Busters, in the playoffs, two 
games to one, according to Glen I. 
Korobov, College evening activities 
assistant. 

In other intramural activities there 
will be a post season tournament for the 
men's basketball league. The tourna- 
ment will feature the division winners in 
both the East and West divisions. The 



games will be played on fiill court and 
the scoreboard will also be used. The 
tournament is slated to get underway on 
November 27 and will go to November 
29, said Korobov. 

An open double elimination 
basketball tournament will also begin on 
Nov. 27. A prerequisite of the tourna- 
ment will be a cUnic for both officials 
and participants. Anyone interested 
should sign up by November 13, said 
Korobov. 



Youth basketball tournament slated next month 

The Intramural Athletics and College Activities Office and the B P 
(Benevolent and Protective Order of) Elks Lodge 173 are co-sponsoring the "1984 
Hoop Shoot", a basketball free throw competition for youth, ages eight to thirteen 
years old. 

According to Mrs. JoAnn R. Fremiotti, coordinator of intramural athletics 
and College activiUes, the contest will take place from I to 4 p.m., on Saturday 
Dec 8, in the Bardo Gymnasium. 

"Anyone in the College community with childem who would like to compete 
can register on-site at no charge. For fiirther information about the event call Col- 
lege Ext. 412," said the coordinator. 

Winners of the competition on Dec 8 are eligible to compete at a regional level 
-.-possibly at a state and national level. "The Elks sponsor any contests above 
the local level," Mrs Fremiotti added. "We are co-sponsoring this event as a com- 
munity service. If the level of participation is high we will consider holding youth 
clmics for sports such as basketball, soccer, etc., in the future " 



Exhibition at Lycoming College 
to highlight suffrage movement 



Ao exhibition of memorabilia titled 
"The Women's Suffrage Movement: 
Words and Deeds," will be on display 
at Lycoming College's art gallery from 
today imtil Wednesday, Nov. 21. 

According to information recieved 
form the Lycoming College public rela- 
tions office, the exhibition features 
photographs, songbooks, sheet music 
for campaign songs and pro-psuffrage 
plays, newsletters and pamphlets from 
various organizations and postcards and 
calendars supporting the cause of 
women being given the right to vote. 

3 children needed 
for comic opera 
this Saturday 

Three children between the ages of 
6 to 12 years old are still needed to help 
participate in the performance of the 
nautical comic opera, "H.N.S. 
Pinafore" to be performed by the 
Camerate Opera Therater at 4 p.m. this 
Saturday in the Academic Center 
Auditorium 

"The children do not have to learn 
any lines for the show," said Mrs. 
JoAnn R. Fremiotti, coordinator of in- 
tramural athletics and College activities, 
"They must enjoy being on stage and be 
able to climb a 10-foot ladder. Their 
stage clothes are jeans, white shirts, and 
sneakers. Most importantly, they must 
be available for rehearsal at 1:30 p.m. 
on the actual performance date." 

Mrs. Fremiotti, said, free tickets 
are no longer available to College 
students, faculty and staff. They must 
now be purchased at a cost of $3.00 
from the Recreation Center, Room 
A137, Lifelong Education Center 
(LEC). Tickets will be sold on a first- 
come, first-serve basis. 

Anyone wishing to help may call 
College Ext. 269, she concluded. 

The Camerata Opera theatre per- 
formance of the Gilbert & Sullivan 
spoof about the nineteenth century 
British Royal Navy is sponsored by the 
College's Special Events Commitlee. 



The women's suffrage movement existed 
from approximately 1850 to 1920 when 
the Nineteenth Amendment to the Con- 
stitution was ratified b y the 66 Con- 



SPOTLIGHTaMoida;, NoTeabcr 12, ifuol 

Students who choose health occuptions 

[Editor's Note: This is a first in a series of articles on the College's 
secondary vocational educational program./ 

Sandra R. Taylor, of the SPOTLIGHT stqff 



Who are the Secondary Vocational 
Education students in the Health Oc- 



gress on Aug. 18, 1920, which cupations curriculum? 
paraphrased sUtes, "The right of 
citizens to vote shall not be denied 
because of their sex." 

Viewing hours at the Lycoming 
College art gallery are 8 a.m. to 1 1 p.m. 
Mondays through Thursdays; 8 a.m. to 
4:30 p.m., Fridays; 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., 
Saturdays, and 1 to 11 p.m. on Sun- 
days. There is no admission charge. 



Secondary students: 
begin and end 
nine-week terms 

High school seniors who are par- 
ticipating in the College's secondary 
vocational education completed their 
first nine-week term last Friday. They 
went back to their home high schools to 
continue their academic requirements, 
and will re-continue their training at the 
College in January 1985. 

High school juniors in the program 
will begin their training at the College 
today, and will continue here for the 
next nine weeks. 



They are students like Annette A. 
Milheim, who works for the American 
Red Cross, as a volunteer. She assists 
in the Bloodmobile drives by taking 
donors' blood pressure, temperatures, 
fiUing out forms and making each per- 
son a little more comfortable. 

Miss Milheim works in the Red 
Cross office. She also teaches children 
in first grade and kindergarten what to 
expect when they go to the doctor's of- 
fice. 

"This course has taught me the 
basics for any field 1 (wish) to go into. 
It (has) laid a foundation to go on to a 
higher (course) of study," said Miss 
Milheim. 

Miss Milheim has decided to enter 
the College next Fall in practical nurs- 
ing. 

Another student in the Health Oc- 
cupations curriculum is Miss Patti J. 
Dercher of Jersey Shore, who works for 
Dr. Richard A. Beatty. She develops 
x-rays, tends to utensils, and assists 
with patients. 



"I didn't know what 1 wanted to 
do or what I wanted to be. It (Health 
Occupations) changed my interest," 
Miss Dercher said. 

When Miss Dercher returns for her 
next term, she would like to work in the 
human service field. 

Lorretta L. Weaver of Howard, 
has her placement at Liberty Curtin 
Elementary School. Sh« works with the 
school nurse, teaching students safety, 
dental care and nutrition. 

"Health Occupations has given me 
a greater opportunity for job placement 
after graduation," Miss Weaver said. 

Next term, Miss Weaver would like 
to try a nursing home as her placement. 
She would like to attend the College and 
enter practical nursing in the Fall. 
Miss Lisa A. Etters of Beach Creek, 
works at the Susque-View Home, Inc. in 
Lock Haven. She makesT)eds, feeds pa- 
tients, gives baths and helps prepares 
menus. 

"This job has taught me a lot of 
responsibiUty. It has taught me what 
it's like to work," Miss Etters said.She 
would hke to enter the College in prac- 
tical nursing. 



Focus: Secondary vocational education students 

By Sandra R. Taylor 



Secondary vocational education of- 
fers students a variety of career options. 
The programs offered are auto body, 
auto mechanics, aviation, carpentry, 
drafting, electrical occupations, 
forestry, machine shop, masonry, small 
engine repair, welding, horticulture, 
cosmetology, quantity food production 
and service and health occupations. 

One of the programs offers 
students hands-on exoerience in the 
Health Occupations Curriculum. 

The instructors for the secondary 
students are, Ms. Janet A. Barbour, 
R.N. of Bloomsburg and Mrs. Jac- 
queline S. Baughman, instructor for 
practical nursing, who designed this 
program, which is subject to approval 



by Dr. Wilham J. Martin, director of 
secondary vocational programs. 

Students are recommended to the 
program by their high school 
counselors. Each student is evaluated 
according to his or her interest and 
abilities. 

Students alternate nine week study 
programs between the high schools and 
the vocational study program. 

High school juniors are taught 



As seniors, students may select 
from any field of study they have 
observed. Students then begin to 
specialize with hands-on experience. 

Students are then placed with a 
program affiliate where they will be ex- 
pected to carry on the learning process. 
Such affiliates are the Williamsport 
Hospital, Divine Providence Hospital, 
Jersey Shore Hospital, Geisinger 
Medical Center, Leader Nursing and 



BENSON 



€Mtn mini, ^ 
/9m market 



Corner of Srd and Maynard Sts. 



Always Open: 
All Night 
Sundays 
and Holidays 




After iliidyin^ hard far 
a lesl. h7;i ml slop *i 
and pick up a snack' 



theory and communication skills in the Rehabihtation South, Susqueview Home 

nursing program. inc., American Red Cross, Dr. Richard 

The students spend eight days at a. Beatty, DDM, Dr. Hess Wertz Jr., 

Leader Nursing and Rehabilitation dentist, Hope Enterprises, Jersey Shore 

Center South, learning bedside nursing. Day Care, Becky Short Family Day 

Eight days are also spent at Divine Pro- Care of Wellsboro, Canton Guthrie 

vidence Hospital, in a variety of depart- clinic. North Penn Junior and Senior 

ments such as central services, cardiac High School, Liberty Curtin Elementaryi 

rehabilitation, physical therapy, oc- School, and Green Home of Wellsboro. 
cupational therapy, radiology, and day 
care center. 

Workshops offered by counseling office 
for students about to enter the job market 

Students of the College who will soon enter the job market are invited to attend 
a number of specialty sessions to be sponsored by the Counsehng, Career Develop- 
ment and Placement office, according to Weldon W. (Web) Michael, career 
development specialist. 

Resume writing: stirring employer interest will be held tomorrow, Nov.20, 12 
to 1:30 p.m. at Natural Resources .Management. It will also be held in the Learning 
Resources Center on Nov. 20 from 3:30 to 5 p.m. in Room 151, and on Nov. 21 
from 1 to 2:30 in Room 205A LRC. 

Interviewing skills: making a good impression will be held today and tomor- 
row, Nov. 19 and 20 from 3:30 to 5 p.m. in Room 155, LRC. This workshop will 
also be held this Wednesday, Nov. 21, 12 to 1:30 p.m. at the Natural Resources 
Management. 

Students must sign up for these workshops by contacting the Counseling office. 
Room 157, LRC. Students at the Natural Resources Management campus should 
contact Dr. Wayne Longbrake. 



SaSPOTUGHTDMondir, Novcmbtr 12, 1984 



Jt d^ GENE .RICHARD 
mJ&S^ WILDER PRYOR 


kAj^^jML ^^ Together Again in.. 




W^ 


STIR 
CILIZY 




'fki>^ '•^-'*.* t** .^.!!l,.^.^..».,...«'ie-ir 



■'Gene Wilder and Richard Pryor are 
the best comic team to hit the 
screen since Laurel and Hardy." 
— Pat Collins, ABC-TV 



$1 (with ID) 
$2 (without ID) 



Tonight 7:30 p.m. 
ACC Auditorium 



PBL will hold 
annual banquet 

The Phi Beta Lambda (PBL) an- 
nual Christmas banquet will be held at 
the Sheraton Motor Lodge in downtown 
Williamsport on Tuesday, Dec. 4, ac- 
cording to David E. Davenport Jr., a 
business management student of South 
Williamsport. 

The dinner will begin at 7:30 p.m. 
with a cash bar starting at 6:30 p.m. 

The menu will include either baked 
chicken (7.20) or ham in raisin sauce 
($8.20>. 

The deadline to register is Nov. 29. 
Any PBL member who wishes to attend 
can sign up in the PBL office located on 
the basement of the Academic Center. 



LEARN WHILE YOU EARN 
reach Skin Care and Color Analysis 
Pan-Time of Full-Time 
As many or as few hours as you wish 
Call 236-0362 After } p.m. 




88.1 FM 

Everything You 

Always Wanted in a 

Radio Station... and 

Less. 



k Classical 
* Jazz 

r Rock 1 Roll 



Commercial Free 



Forum membership up; 
"Week" scheduling now 

A possible membership increase of 
six or seven women was the outcome of 
last Monday night's coffee in front of 
the Le Juene Chef restaurant, sponsored 
by the Women's Forum, according to 
Ms. Kathryn A. Ferrence, career 
development specialist and co-advisor 
She and Mrs. Veronica M. Muzic, 
interim director of the integrated studies 
division and co-adviser, distributed 
forum literature and were on-hand to 
discuss the organization and its spon- 
soring of "Women's Week". 

Ms. Ferrence noted that she, Mrs. 
Muzic, and Mrs. JoAnn R. Fremiotti, 
coordinator of intramural athletics and 
College activities, had a planning 
meeting last Tuesday for "Women's 
Week," deciding who to "delegate" 
work to. 

The co-adviser added that for Mrs. 
Fremiotti, it is part of her job to help 
with "Women's Week," since funds 
come from the student activities budget 
She detailed that the three women will ' 
be arranging schedules and confirming 
dates for the "Women's Week" ac- 
tivities, which are slated to begin Apnl 
14^ 

COOK NEEDED: ViUa Golden Strip 
Italian Cooking, perfer someone 
with experience. Work around 
student hours. Call Chris Greene 
at home before 3 p.m. after 3 p.ra 
call 323-5533 

^^ Buy One pizza! 
Get one FREE! 



BULLETIN BOARD 

For week of Monday, Nov. 12 through Sunday, Nov. 18 

MOVIE 

"Stir Crazy"... 7:30 p.m. this evening, Academic Center Auditorium, $1 ad- 
mission with validated College ID, S2 admission for all others. 
MEETINGS 

Student Government Association.. .(s p.m., tomorrow, Tuesday, Nov. 13, 
Room BI07, Lifelong Education Center. 

Circle K Club... 3:30 p.m., today. Room B107, Lifelong Education Center. 

Phi Beta Lambda.. .V.\i p.m., tomorrow, Tuesday, Nov. 13, Room 329, 
Academic Center. 

Alpha Omega Fellowship... 7 to 10 p.m., tomorrow, Tuesday, Nov. 13, Room 
227, Academic Center. 

Sigma Pi Omega... 4 to 5 p.m., this Wednesday, Nov. 14, Room 8107, 
Lifelong Education Center. 

RAFFLE 

Gamma Epsilon TflB... continuing through tomorrow, Tuesday, Nov. 13 ~ 
date of drawing. Tickets may be purchased from members at a cost of 50 cents per 
ticket or three tickets for $1. First prize is a Cabbage Patch doll and second prize is 
a Trivial Pursuit board game. 

PSU students 
tour the College 

On Friday, November 2, 11 doc- 
toral students from the Pennsylvania 
State University, who are talcing a 
course in higher education, came to the 
College to learn about community col- 
leges. 

According to John F. Thompson, 
associate academic dean, the students 
chose the College for their field trip 
because it is "unique". "We are the on- 
ly community college that is secondary 
and post-secondary. A higher percen- 
tage of the student body is enrolled in 
the vocational technical program than 
anywhere else," Thompson said. 

"We spent about one hour on an 
overview of the CoUege-what a com- 
munity college is~an an hour and a half 
touring the College. At the end we talk- 
ed about articulation established with 
various vocational technical schools," 
Thompson said. 

YECH! 
A college student in Kingston, 
N.C. determined that some of the most 
unpleasant feelings felt in life includ- 
ed... having your watchband pull the 
hair out of your arm, morning breath, 
your dog's morning breath, death, and 
"^a'^nage. 



Phi Beta Lambda (PBL) is 
thanking everyone who supported 
their bake sale last Tuesday, 
which was cited as a success by 
David E. Davenport Jr., a 
business management student 
from South Williamsport. 



Renovations are complete 
on word processing lab 

The Shared Word Logic IBM word 
processing lab on the third floor of the 
Academic Center is complete, according 
to John F. Thompson, associate 
academic dean. 

According to Thompson, the pro- 
gram was established last year and was 
moved to the Administration building to 
be temporarily housed. Now that 
renovations are complete, the lab will 
resume in the Academic Center 
sometime next week. 

"The wiring was upgraded, the 
walls reconfigurated, new woodwork 
put in and the walls have been sound- 
proofed, which is a fancy way of saying 
we put carpeting on the walls," accor- 
ding to Thompson. "It's basically the 
same format as the ILC (individualized 
learning center)," Thompson said. He 
estimates that the renovation cost 
$70,000. 



MUMS FOR SALE IN COLLEGE BOOKSTORE 



Today until all are sold! 

$4 00 per pot, 30 to 40 pals available 
Sale sponsored by the Floriculture studnets 




sL.^:^::^ 



-«^ii^^j 



CILLO'S COLLEGE CORNER 

We'll prepare your favorite Subs and Burgers the way 
you like them! 

Play LUCKY NUMBERS and win a half sub plus a medium 
drink. Four winners every week! 

Cillo's College Corner 

1 100 W. Third St. .Williamsport 

(Next to Academic Center) Phone Ahead: 322-1321 

Hours; 7:30 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. Monday through Friday 







Spotlight 

Mondty, November 19, 1984 • Vol. 20, No. 14 • 8 Piges 
WiUiimsport Area Commaoily College • Williamsport, Pi. 17701 

INSIDE: 



Focus on students... Pige s 

Sports,. Page 6 

Club briefs Page? 

Classifieds Page 8 




THE ARTISTS UNLIMITED hid their tint in a series of monlhly sales of their 
"worid-fafflous hot dogs steamed in beer" last Wednesday daring InnchUme in 
the Academic Center foyer. The group reaped a $64.26 profit, which will be used 
for dab actiyities. The arlistj have extended a "thank yon" to aU of their 
patrons, one being a hungry student pictured above, drooUng o?er the "merchan- 
dise". {SPOTLIGHT pholo by Gisela D. Grassley] 



Student aid increased over $1M according to College report 



Courtesy College Information Office 

Noting a "return of significant 
growth," Donald S. Shade, director of 
financial aid, said that over 2,000 Col- 
lege students received over $6 million in 
financial aid for the 1983-84 academic 
year, according to a recently-released 
annual financial aid report. 

The figure includes grants, loans, 
scholarships, and work study. 

Shade detailed that the volume of 
aid has increased by more than SI 
milHon between the years of 1978-79 
and 1981-82. In the 1981-82 year, the 
director stated that growth of aid "slow- 
ed considerably", with the total aid in- 
creasing by only $25,401. In the 
1983-84 year, every aid program, except 



work-study, increased in aid, totalling 
an increase of 212 students and 
$686,330. 

Program increases noted 

Broken down into programs. Pell 
grants recipients increased by 16 per- 
cent, of 208 students, and awards in- 
creased by over 25 percent, or $309,581. 
Shade added that this is the largest 
single year increase in that program 
since the 1978 passage of the Middle In- 
come Student Assistance Act, which 
made these grants available to students 
from families with incomes of up to 
$25,000. 

Shade also stated that the 
PHEAA,(Pennsylvania State Grant 
Program), and the SEOG, (Supplemen- 
tal Grant Program), noted increases in 

Shaffer receives $400 scholarship 
awarded to College by Michigan firm 



the number of recipients and the 
amounts received, with SEOG recipients 
increasing nearly 46 percent, or by 72 
students. 

Private grants also increased 

The number of recipients also in- 
creased in the College's work study 
program, by 29 percent, yet the amount 
earned was decreased for the third con- 
secutive year, Shade added. 

The report showed thai the largesi 
percentage increases occurred in private 
.grants and scTioIarships, with (he 
number of recipients increasing by 116 
percent, or 44 students, and awards in- 
creasing by 191 percent, or by $24,862. 

The largest contribution made was 
from Wheel Inn, Inc., of Roaring 
Branch, donating $8,000 to provide 



assistance for student in the agriculture- 
related programs. 

Sixteen students received awards of 
$500 each. 

J_njhe area of student loans, the 
report findings indicated that 1,885 Col- 
lege students borrowed over $4 million. 
This is an increase of 90 students and 
$305,230. The average amount of the 
loans borrowed were $2,161. 

Since 1978-79, the number of stu- 
deat borrowers has cngre th an i 
and the loan volume has more than 
tripled. Shade noted. 
Director noted college costs increases 
Shade also noted that the steadily 
increasing level of borrowing is a "cons- 

UUMPlease turn to page 7 



Courtesy College Information Office 

Lee J. Shaffer, a second-year 
floriculture student from Mt. Pleasant 
Mills RD 1, was recently awarded a 
$400 Vocational Horticulture Scholar- 
ship from Bedding Plants Inc., of 
Okemos, Michigan. 

Shaffer was also given a one-year 
membership in the company, which has 
over 4,200 members. 



< Officials noted that the scholarship 
recognizes Shaffer's academic 
achievements, interest and potential in 
the bedding plant industry. 

Dennis E. Fink, instructor of hor- 
ticulture, recommended Shaffer, who is 
involved in a cooperative on-the-job 
work experience with a retail bedding 
plant grower. 



'Personalized approach' to students 
to be implemented in Advisement Center 
beginning at College tomorrow 



Workshops today and tomorrow 
for students entering job market 

Special sessions on resume writing and interviewing skills are being offered to- 
day and tomorrow for College students who plan to enter the job market soon, ac- 
cording to Weldon W. Michael, career development specialist. 

The sessions are -being sponsored by the CounseHng, Career Development and 
Placement Office. 

Resume writing: stirring employer interest will be held from noon to 1:30 p.m. 
• tomorrow at the Natural Resources Management campus, and from 3:30 to 5 p.m. 
in Room 151, Learning Resources Center. This session will also be held from 1 to 
2:30 p.m. tomorrow in Room 205A, LRC. 

The other session, interviewing skills: making a good impression, will be held 
from 3:30 to 5 p.m. today and tomorrow in Room 151, and from 1 to 2:30 p.m. 
tomorrow in Room 205A, LRC. 

Students must sign-up for the workshops by contacting the Counseling Office, 
in Room 157, LRC. Students at the Natural Resources Management campus should 
contact Dr. Wayne Longbrake, director of that division, to sign-up, Michael noted. 



In a continuing attempt to provide 
improved services to students. Dr. 
Robert L. Breuder, College president, 
met last week with Dr. Robert G. 
Bowers, executive assistant to the presi- 
dent; Rodney G. Hurley, dean of educa- 
tional research, planning and evaluation 
and interim dean of student services; 
Chester D. Schuman, director of admis- 
sions; R. Dean Foster, director of 
developmental studies, and Lawrence 
W. Emery Jr., director of counseling, 
career development and placement, to 
discuss progress on the implementation 
of the plans for the Advisement Center, 
as formulated by a Committee "A" 
whose report was submitted to Foster in 
August of this year. 

According to Emery, Dr. Breuder 
is very supportive of the concept of the 
Advisement Center, which would pro- 
vide - among other things - a more 
personalized approach by College staff 
to students as they make their plans to 
enroll. Counselors and advisers will 
assist in the scheduling and orienting 
new students on the same day they take 
their required placement tests. 



Starting tomorrow, placement tests 
will be scored the same day as they are 
administered, enabUng students to be 
advised and scheduled for courses for 
the Spring 1985 semester before they 
leave that day. This will enable students 
to have a better idea of how their course 
of study fits in with their career plans. It 
will also enable counselors to insure that 
problems, such as financial aid are 
taken care of in person before the stu- 
dent leaves the campus, according to 
Emery. 

"I am excited about the idea of be- 
ing able to provide a more personalized 
■■■ Please turn to Page S 



Mr. Cillo: 

Follow your doctor's orders 
and take it easy! 
We all miss you, but not to 
worry, all is well. Get well soon! 

JO students 



iDSPOTUCHTDMoDdtj, Nojember U, 1»»4 



Question: Now that the College's 
inlercollegiale sports program 
will not be available next year, 
what activities do you suggest 
the College provide instead? 

Location: Bardo Gym 

Photos: Richard E Kopp Jr 

Text: Wanna F. Brown 




Jeannle F. Long, human ser- 
vices student from Wllliamsporl: 
"More dances and more movies 
during the week.' 



i 



Two beauties 
glamourize TV 
comedy with 
liberated twist 

Sandra R. Taylor's 
SPOTLIGHT TV review 



Whaddya Say...?- 






1^ 



Britt O, Stock, business 
management student from Liber- 
ty: "More effort put (back) into in- 
tercollegiate sports." 



Marjorie A. Showver, adver- 
tising art student from Lewisburg: 
"Use the money towards the 
courses, in my case, the art pro- 
gram. The cost of food could be 
lower and better gym 
equipment." 




Roy E Bookhamer Jr., ar- 
architeclural technology student, 
from Altoona; "Start a wrestling 
program, because I was disap- 
pointed that the College didn't 
have one (when I came). They 
are relatively cheap to start." 




Robert G O'Dell, general 
studies student from 
Williamsport: "Musicals, plays, 
theatre, rock concerts with local 
bands." 





David B Pannabacker, 
diesel mechanic student from 
Reading; "Fix the gym and con- 
certs - local bands." 



Lisa E. Secrist, human ser- 
vices student from Muncy: "More 
dances and concerts for the 
students. More movies - two 
films instead of just one." 



T.V.'s trend of glitter and glamour 
takes a liberated twist with the new 
season's series, "Partners in Crime". 

Loni Anderson and Linda Garter 
portray two private investigators, who 
share "one thing" in common: the 
same ex-husband, who is now deceas- 
ed. 

In the reading of his will the ex- 
husband leaves controlling interests of 
his entire estate, including his in- 
vestigating business, to two of his ex- 
wives; Carol (Carter) and Sidney 
(Anderson). 



Sidney is a former cello player 
who has a very "colorful" background, 
and was aspiring to play in a sym- 
phony orchestra. In the meantime, she 
was performing in a seedy little bar. 
Carol is a former businesswoman who 
was raised In high society - full of 
class, sophistication, poise and 
elegance. Together they jibe. What 
one lacks, the other one complements. 

The show is a light and airy com- 
edy with a small amount of drama 
thrown in. The pair always snare their 
man or solve the mystery. 



fvlen delight in laying down laws, 
yet they delight more in breaking them. 



SPOTLIGHT 
Monday, Nov. 19, 1984 ■ Vol. 20, No. 14 

The SPOTLIGHT Is pubiistied eacti h/onday 
morning of ttie academic year, except for Col- 
lege vacations, by journalism and ottier in- 
terested students of Ttie Williamsport Area Com- 
munity College. 

Office. Room 7, Academic Center, 1005 
W. Ttiird St., Williamsport, Pa. 17701. 
Telephone (717) 326-3761, Extension 221 



'Detailed' characters fall in love 
in stormy brushes with death 



Opinions expressed are those of the student 
newspaper or of those whose names accom- 
pany items. Opinions do not reflect official opi- 
nion of the institution. 



The novel,"Love. Cherish Me" will 
hold the reader spell-bound. This en- 
chanting tale of two lovers if far from 
typical. The ending is determined in the 
first chapter, but is soon forgotten as 
the story unfolds. 

Rebecca Brandewyne, the author 
of this outstanding novel, has skillfully 
blended sex, romance, drama, and 
suspense. 

The two central characters are so 
finely detailed it's not hard to become 
involved with them. 

Teen faces hardships 

Storn Lesconllair is a 16-year-old 



Jennifer S. White's 
SPOTLIGHT book review 

southern belle who is gambled away 
by her uncle in a poker game. She Is 
honor-bound to marry a wealthy Texas 
rancher, whom she despises. At the 
start of her journey to Texas for her 
wedding, her name becomes the path 
of her life. 

"The Wolf" saves Storm 
A gun-slinger known as El Lobo 
(the Wolf) is feared by all who know 
him, but this man finds Storm in a 
repulsive situation and half-heartedly 
decides to help her out. He assumes 
the role of mentor, teaching her to live 
as an Indian. 



Their adventures take the reader 
across the unsettled western prairies. 
Their near brushes with death turn 
them into lovers. The sexual en- 
counters are explicit but romantic in 
the way they are presented. Dramatic 
escapades will keep the pages turning 
because the reader "has to know" 
what happens. 

Encounters may be turnofi 
There may be some people of- 
fended by the explicit details, but I 
would recommend the novel for 
something to read. 



THE STAFF 
Donna M. Barnatt, Managing Editor; Karen M. 
Metarko, Editofial Page Edilor; Gisela 0. 
Grassley, Pnolography Editor: Mark S. 
Schwanke, Administrative Affairs Editor, James 
K Morrissey, Student Affairs Editor; Kathryn M. 
Gilbert, Advertising Manager, Rodney D Hill, 
Sporfs Editor; Richard E Kopp Jr., Sen/or Staff 
Writer 

REPORTERS/STAFF ASSOCIATES 

Wanna F Brown, Melanie S Cailahan, 
Kathleen L Eiswert. George I Hawk, Robert W 
l^inier. Anne T Morateili, Oonald E Mumtord, 
Sandra L Musgrave, Sandra R. Taylor, James E 
Treese. Jennifer S White, LeRoy S. Whitmire 
Jr . Canda M ZInck 

Faculty adviser; Anthony N. Cillo 



Production Staff This Issue 

Gisela 0- Grassley. production supervisor; 
Sandra R Taylor, videocomposition; Karen M 
Metarko, copy editor, and Kathleen L Eiswert, 
Anne T. Morateili, and Jennifer S, White, pro- 
duction assistants 



SPOTLIGHTDMondiy, Novembtr 19, I984d3 



E 



SGA memo gives reasoning 
for cutting competitive sports 
at College next year 



lEdilor's Sole: This is a memo 
from Steven D. Metzker, president of 
the Student Government Association 
(SGA), to Rodney G. Hurley, dean of 
planning, research, and evaluation, 
and interim dean of student services, 
concerning the SGA 's position on the 
College's abolishment of the inter- 
collegiate sports program cfler the 
1984-85 year. The program was of- 
ficially cut by the College administra- 
tion on October 30.1 

The Student Government Associa- 
tion has reviewed the administrative 
decision to ehminate intercollegiate 
athletics from the 1985-86 College Ac- 
tivities budget and supports that deci- 
sion. The following is rationale why the 
SGA supports the administration in cut- 
ting out the intercollegiate athletics at 
the College: 

1. Very little interest was shown by 
the total student body towards the inter- 
collegiate athletics issue. The SGA felt it 
is in the best interest of the students, 
since few opinions were voiced, to agree 
with the administration in eliminating 
the program. 

2. Student interest was shown by 
the total student body towards the inter- 

Focus on secondary students:-- 



collegiate athletics as very poor, Many 
SGA senators found that students on 
campus do not know that an inter- 
collegiate athletic program exists. 
Minimal amount of students attend 
athletic functions. 

3. Participation in the athletic pro- 
grams itself is too small. We do realize 
that only a limited number of people 
can participate actively in a sport. 
However, for example, a number of 18 
people trying out for a tennis team with 
10 actively participating is a sign of low 
interest for a College of this size. 

4. The SGA feels that the number 
of students who signed petitions is low 
compared to the total number of 
students attending the College. Also, the 
validity of the petitions is questionable. 
Many were passed around in a 
classroom situation where students were 
told to sign the petition. It is natural not 
to want to cut programs, but given op- 
tions and an understanding of the com- 
petiveness in the College Activities 
budget for funding, students view inter- 
collegiate athletics as a low priority, as 
it does not service the broad students 
population. 

5. The intercollepate aihletic 



budget is composed totally of expen- 
ditures, no revenue is generated. 

The following are recommenda- 
tions of the Student Government 
Association concerning intercollegiate 
athletics: 

1 . The money cut out of the inter- - 
collegiate athletic program should be us- 
ed to benefit a wider variety of students. 
A way to go about this would be to give 
the SGA a voice in the expanding 
monies to be used to benefit students, 
i.e., funding for club activities, develop- 
ment of recreational facilities, and pro- 
viding more services and activities for 
the general student body. 

2. The SGA feels that, if we have 
access to this money, we could be able 
to generate more student interest in the 
College and raise the morale of the 
students at the College. By helping stu- 
dent organizations fund more events, 
student interest would rise in that 
organization which would keep students 
on campus ultimately benefiting the 
College. 

3. The SGA would like to see 
athletic clubs organized. A cross coun- 
try club or tennis club could participate 
independently with the aid of funding 



College's Secondary electronics provides practical education 



/Editor's Note: This is second in a series of articles on the secondary vocational 

By Sandra R. Taylor 
OF (he SPOTLIGHT staff 

The secondary vocational students sontown, is the president of the Voca- 

have a variety of practical experience tional Industrial Clubs of America 

during their vocational training in the (VICA). 
Electrical Occupations curriculum. sjpce his secondary training began. 

The instructor for the secondary wirth has worked at Hills Grove Cam- 
students is Melvin (Keith) Wynn, who pgrounds, the School for the Blind, and 
explained what the curriculum entailed, at the Kiwanis Club. Because of his 

As juniors, students learn theory, chosen curriculum, he has been asked to 

residential circuit design, residential do wiring for friends, and even his 

electronical services, blue print reading, manager at his outside job. 
conduit bending, the national electrical wjrth said that he knew a lot about 

code, low voltage circuit electric heat, electronics because he has a large sound 

and estimates. system at home, which inspired him to 

Seniors learn industrial circmt igarn more about the electronics field, 
design, industrial notor control, When asked about his future plans, 

transformer motors, AC-3 phase, single wirth said, "I will either enter the Navy 

phase, DC-3, alternators, DC as an electrical engineer of come to the 

generator, programmable logic, and college in this curriculum by fall. Elec- 

raotor control, and during the last nine tronics will be my future." 
weeks, work on open house projects for ponald C. Rhinehart, a senior 

the College. from Jersey Shore, and vice president of 

The secondary vocational students viCA, entered the electrical occupa- 

attended orientation last Monday, as tjons curriculum through the recom- 

they were the second group of high mendation of his counselor, 
school students to begin their nine week Rhinehart said, "This trade taught 

vocational programs. me what I'll need for the future." 



Who are the secondary vocational 
education students in the Electrical Oc- 
cupations curriculum? 

Students like Matthew S. Wirth, of 
Warrior Run High School, from Wat- 



Rhinehart plans to enroll in the 
electrical engineer occupations post- 
secondary curriculum this fall. 

Brian E. Confer, a senior in the 
Jersey Shore High School, is the 



education program and its students./ 



treasurer of VICA. 

Since he started his vocational pro- 
gram, he has worked, wiring cabins at 
Hillsgrove, Camp Kiwanis, and the 
School for the Blind. 

When asked about the program 
and what it meant to him. Confer 
said, "I think the program gives students 
the opportunity to learn two job skills, 
plus a lot of people couldn't even afford 
to go to college, this program gives us 
the chance." 

Electronics is in the future for Con- 
fer, as he plans to enroll at the College. 

Secondary orientation 
held last Monday 

Secondary vocational students at- 
tended orientation last Monday, as they 
were the second group to begin their 
nine week vocational programs. 

Dr. William J. Martin, director of 
secondary vocational programs, gave a 
welcome to all students and informed 
them of what they should expect, as did 
Michael J. Slanzione, secondary voca- 
tional programs coordinator. 

Each student was then taken by the 
instructors to the areas they were assign- 
ed. 



should student interest deem ap- 
propriate. 

4. The SGA would like to have in- 
put prior to decisions made by the ad- 
ministration of the College. Oftentimes, 
their decision directly affects the student 
body, in which students are given little 
prior input. 

The SGA feels it is in the best in- 
terest of the student body to eliminate 
intercollegiate athletics and expand 
those funds to improve and expand ser- 
vices and activities for the broad student 
population. This course of action is 
deemed by the SGA to be for the better- 
ment of the College based upon input 
received from students naming priority 
activities desired. However, the SGA 
reaffirms that the administration should 
contact SGA for input and recommen- 
dations prior to making such decisions 
that involve College activities funds as 
well as any other decisions that directly 
affect the student body. We also request 
the administration provide support 
documentation and rationale for the 
SGA to use in order to guide them in 
their decision making process with such 
issues. ^— 

Time sheets due Nov. 21 

College work-study students are 
reminded that all time sheets must be 
turned into the Financial Aid Office, 
Room 201, Academic Center, by this 
Wednesday, Nov. 21, according to Mrs. 
Edna F. Reiff, financial aid assistant. 

Students who do not submit their 
time sheets by the deadline will not 
receive their checks, she added. 



'Personalized approach' 

Conlinued from Page /■■■ 
approach to students, which will allow 
them to have a chance to talk with a 
counselor or adviser before they enroll 
in the College, so they will know their 
course of study will enhance their career 
and educational plans," Emery said. 
"Proper advisement and counseUng is a 
key to the retention of students," accor- 
ding to Emery, "which will be both 
beneficial to our students and the Col- 
lege." 



Le Juene Chef 
open Wednesdays 

Le Juene Chef will not serv- 
ing lunch on Tuesdays, Thursdays 
and Fridays until Nov. 27, accor- 
ding to Mrs. Judith M. Patsche, 
instructor of quantity food ser- 
vices. 

The restaurant will be open 
for lunch from 11:30 a.m. to I 
p.m. on Wednesdays, according 
to Mrs. Patsche. 



4DSPOTlIGHTDMo»d«y, Nofcmbtr 19, 19M 



Cooking for politicians and stars infamous U.S. 
restaurants part of new instructor's past 



John F. Kennedy, Spiro Agnew, 
and Nancy Sinatra are a few of the 
famous people that Howard R. Mihan, 
the newest teacher addition to the foods 
curriculum, has cooked for. 

Preparing meals in a variety of 
cuisine restaurants across the country, 
Mihan got his start by working in his 
uncle's "successful" restaurant as a 
young child. "The deal was that I'd 
work in his restaurant and in turn, he'd 
take me fishing on his boat," Mihan 
reflected. "Thai's when I knew I liked 
it." 

While attending school at New 
York City Community College, he was 
employed by Hotel Carisle. Cooking 
there for a year, he was the head chef 
during the evening hours. "I had the en- 
tire responsibility of the kitchen," he 
noted. 
Experiences with former president 

Highlighting his cooking experience 
there was the fact that he prepared 
meals for John F. Kennedy. "He stayed 
there in the presidential suite whenever 
he came to the city. I saw him enter the 
hotel with Spiro Agnew -- Secret Service 
agents were throughout the entire 
hotel." 

!^^ Buy One PIZZA 
Get One FREE! I 

I 

^ I 



■J 




Cilio's 

College Corner 

We'll prepare your 
favorite Subs and Burgers 
the way you like them! 



Play LUCKY NUMBERS 

and 

win a half sub 

plus medium drink 

Four Winners 
Every Week, 



ClUo'i CoOtft rotnn 
HOC W. niro SI.. WilliimiiKirt 
(Ntil tr> Acidtmic Onlcr) 
Phonr Ahead: JZI 1.121 



Mon.-Tkurs. 7:30 a 
Fii. 1:)0 p.m. lo !; 



]6:00p 



By Kathleen L. Eiswert 
~~'0F the SPOTLIGHT stuff """ 

Expanding his knowledge, he then 
"picked up" a few credits at different 
universities. 

Noting that his trade is wrapped 
around classic cooking, he worked in a 
number of cuisine restaurants. They in- 
clude Brasserie's, a French cafe, and 
The Leguardia Terrace, which featured 
European and American food. 

Including food management in his 
career, he managed Oscar's in New 
York City. 

Delving into hospital "cuisine" 

From there, he took a job at New 
York City University Medical Center. 
"I started out as a dishroom supervisor, 
and ended up as the assistant director of 
the department," he said. Moving into 
hospital food programs, he directed the 
food service department at Stanford 
Hospital, and Lancaster Osteopathic. 
He also was employed by the Good 
Samaritian Hospital in Baltimore, 
Maryland. 

Advancing in his trade, he cooked 
in the New York Daily News executive 
dining facilities. "We'd cook for the 
political candidates who were being in- 
terviewed for the paper," Mihan said. 
Some of the nominees fed there were 

Hospital opening 
arthritis unit 

Donald R. Creamer, president and 
chief executive officer of the 
Williamsport Hospital, has announced 
the hospital will be opening an arthritis 
treatment unit in early 1985. 

Mr. Creamer said the area will be 
headed by Keith N. Shenberger, M.D., 
a physician prominent in the study and 
treatment of arthritis in its many forms 
and related diseased, such as lupus, 
severe gout and musculorskeletal 
disorders. Mr. Creamer noted that Dr. 
Shenberger is Board certified by the 
American Board of Rheumatology and 
the . American Board of Internal 
Medicine. 

Dr. Shenberger said the majority of 
cases 10 be treated at the unit will in- 
volve rheumatoid arthritis, although the 
most common type is osteroarthritis. 
He points out that one out of every 
seven persons has or will contract some 
form of the disease and that five out of 
ten persons with arthritis have osterar- 
thritis. Two out of ten persons with ar- 
thritis have rheumatoid arthritis and 
three out of ten have related diseases. 

According to Dr. Shenberger, the 
most appropriate patients for the unit 
are those with chronic or long-term pro- 
blems. The hospital approach will be 
multidisciplinary involving occupational 
therapy, physical therapy, recreational 
therapy, hydro and electrotherapy, 
vocational counseling, psychology and 
sports medicine, all components of the 
Harry R. Gibson Rehabilitation Center 
at the hospital. 



Richard Nixon, Edward Muskie, and 
Hubert Humphrey. Mihan added that 
he spoke with Humphrey while he was 
vice-president. "I'll never forget it," he 
recalled, "Humphrey walked right into 
the kitchen and shook my hand. He was 
a very sincere man." 

By that time, he was serving a 
sizable amount of people - anywhere 
from 90 to 3,800. 
Preparing meals for Hollywood stars 

On to California, where he ran an 
American continental cuisine restaurant 
"Chef in the Forest". Terming the 
eatery successful, he noted that it was 
featured in the Los Angeles Times and 
in Palm Springs Magazine. There, he 
prepared meals for Art Linkletter, Peter 
Fonda, Nancy Sinatra and the governor 
of California. He added, "Linkletter's 
daughter waitressed at our place." 

Currently an instructor at the Col- 
lege, Mihan describes his job as "new 
and interesting". He commented that 
"the foods area has a good layout and 
is well-equipped to be competitive with 
more widely-known schools." 



PSU personnel students 
get College services tour 

Five masters degree-seeking 
graduate students from the Student Per- 
sonnel Services program at the Universi- 
ty Park campus of the Pennsylvania 
State University visited the College's 
main campus last Tuesday. 

The tour, which was coordinated 
by Lawrence W. Emery Jr., director of 
counseling, career development, and 
placement, included visits to the various 
offices and included an overview of the 
services provided to students. 

The group visited the offices of 
Financial Aid, Admissions, 
Developmental Studies/ Act 101, In- 
tramural Athletics and College Ac- 
tivities, and Counseling, Career 
Development, and Placement, and met 
the directors of the offices. 

The students were also given a tour 
of the rest of the Main Campus. For 
most of these guests, it was their first 
visit to a comprehensive community col- 
lege and they were impressed with the 
College, according to Emery. 



Pain is the breaking of the shell that 
encloses understanding 



GTE Sylvania employees in course 



Nineteen employees of GTE 
Sylvania, of Reach Road in 
Williamsport, are enrolled in an in- 
troductory course in the use of 
microcomputers here on Tuesday and 
Thursday evenings through next Tues- 
day, Nov. 27. 

"The Introduction to Wordstar" 
course will give the employees the op- 
portunity to learn basic skills required 
for most types of use of flexible word 
processing systems. The course objec- 

Public Utility Commission 
public input hearing set: 
rate request to be debated 

The Pennsylvania Public Utility 
Commission has scheduled public input 
hearings in connection with the Penn- 
sylvania Power and Light Company's 
recently filed $330 million rate increase 
request, according to information pro- 
vided by PP&L. 

If the full request is granted by the 
PUC and the phase-in is allowed, the 
increase for a 500 kwh 
(kilowatt)-a-month customer would be 
$4.58 per month beginning on April 26, 
1986, for a total of $9. 16 per month, ac- 
cording to the information. 

The public input hearing for the 
Williamsport area will be held in the 
College auditorium on Tuesday, Dec. 
11 at 7 p.m. All comments will be made 
part of the official record and will be 
considered by the judge and the com- 
mission before they make their decision, 
according to the information. 



lives are to give the employees the op- 
portunity to apply word processing 
systems to their field of work and enable 
them to become adept at problem solv- 
ing on the microcomputer. 

The employees represent mid- 
management as well as accounting and 
engineering departments, and 
secretaries. 

Mrs. Anne E. Weilminster, infor- 
mation center support analyst at the 
College, is the instructor. 

Student awarded honor 

Albert R. Griffin, a practical nursing 
student of Montoursville, was named se- 
cond alternative in a contest sponsored 
by the Lycoming County unit of the 
American Cancer Society. 

Griffin was the first male who had 
entered the event that names the annual 
Nurse of Hope. 

I New library hours 
I set over holiday 

With the Thanksgiving hoh- 
;¥ day approaching, the College 
;* library hours will be until 7pm, 
:;; Wednesday, Nov. 21, and 8 a m 
*: to 4:30 p.m., Monday, Nov 26, 
S according to Mrs. Kate D 
:S Hickey, director of the Learning 
% Resources Center. 

The library will be closed on 
:¥ Friday, Saturday, and Sunday, •■ 
I Nov. 23, 24, and 25. 

Regular hours will resume on 
I Tuesday, Nov. 27, Mrs. Hickey 
I stated. 

•i&ftSSW;:W«¥:¥SK:SfS:ft¥:¥SWS:i- \-'- Sf* 




SPOTUGHTaMondiy, NovtnDbtr 19, l9Ma5 



THE TUTORING CENTER provides aid in math, Engysh, 
accounting and psychology just to name a few. Here being tutored 
is Glenn D. Murray, electrical technology student from Sbamokin, 
by Wendy R. Price, a general studies student from Montoursville. 



SPOTLIGHTing 
students 



at the Learning Resources 
Center (LRC) 





THE STUDY AREAS of the 
library provide solitude and reference 
materials to Deanna M. Heck, a 
general studies student from Lock 
Haven; Charles E. Fausnaught, a 
business management student from 
Danville, and Craig A. Troutman, a 
drafting technology student from 
Cogan Station. 



Photos and Text 

By Gisela D. Grassley 

SPOTLIGHT 

PhotographyEtUtor 




THE MICROFILM READER in 

the library provides Becky S. Bechdel, 
a word processing student from Mill 
Hall, with a New York Times article 
dated back to 1963. The reader is easy 
to use and prints can be made "on the 
spot". 



AT THE LIBRARY: Rodney A. Eisenhower, a construction 
carpentry student from Curvensville and Robert P. Leary, a con- 
struction carpentry student from Ebensburg, give academic 
assistance to students. 



BENSON 



€Ifit mini. ^ 
nttt market 



Corner of 3rcl and Maynard Sts. 



J 



HuyigryT 
LLiltljl \ \^§ In a hurry? 

/ , vv i \ Don't want to wait! 

A. 




^ 



Always Open 
All night, Holidays, and Sundays 



JENNY 0. KUYPER, a retaU 
management student from Troy, 
checks out the supplies at the College 
Bookstore, which offers a multitude of 
materials, including textbooks, for 
students. 




6DSPOTLIGHTaMoiid«j, Novembfr 19, 19M 



Intramural sports planned for Nov. 



The gym will close at 4 p.m. 
Wednesday, Nov. 21, until Tuesday, 
Nov. 27, according to Glen I. Korobov, 
College evening activities assistant. 

A pool tournament is slated to get 
under way on Saturday, Dec. I, in the 
Recreation Center. Anybody interested 
can sign up in the Rec Center, said 
Korobov, 

Table Tennis is available for 
anyone interested. Reservations must be 
made 24 hours in advance, by going to 
the student activities and intramural 
sports area or by calling Ext. 269. 

Two basketball tournaments will 
start on Tuesday, Nov. 27. The winners 
of the East and West divisions will play 
for the overall league title in a best of 
three tournament and a tournament 
open to students, faculty and staff will 
also be held at the same time, added 
Korobov. 



Men's Basketball Standings 
East Division 

1. G'town, eight wins, no losses. 

2. Knights, five wins, three losses. 

3. Warriors, one win, seven losses. 

4. Freeze, no wins, eight losses. 




West Division 

I.Yuk-A-Roidz, six wins, two 

losses. 

2.Bums, five wins, three losses. 

3.Payton Gang, four wins, four 

losses. 

4.Corrosion, three wins, five 

losses. 



• •• 



Sports Schedule 



• •• 



Intercollegiate Sports 

Men's Basketball 

Monday: Tip-Off Tournament, 
away at Butler County Community Col- 
lege, 8 p.m. 

Tuesday: Tip-Off Tournament, 
away at Butler County Community Col- 
lege, 8 p.m. 



Intramural Sports 

Men's Basketaball 

Tuesday: Bums vs. Payton Gang, 
Yuk-A-Roidz vs. Corrosion, both 
games at 7 p.m.; The Freeze vs. 
knights. Warriors vs. G'Town, both 
games at 8 p.m. 



We Three closing gap on leaders 



We Three have picked up some 
ground on W.A.C.C. Five-0 in the 
most recent week of the College bowling 
league. The other teams in the league 
are still holding on as they too are still 
providing some tough competition for 
the lop teams. 

Only two teams out of the field of 
eight are below the .500 mark in the 
league standings. 

Team Standings 

Team Standings, with the first 
number after the team name represen- 
ting wins and the second number 
reprcscning losses, are: I. W.A.C.C. 
Five-0, 17-7. 2. We Three, 15-9. 3. Pin 
Busters and Dew Crew, 14-10. 5. 
Scratch, 13-1 1. 6. The Outlaws, 12-7. 7. 
Lucky Strikes, 11-13. 8. Gutter Dusters, 
0-24. 

High Team Scries 

1. Scratch, 1949; 2. Pin Busters, 
1865; 3. We Three, 1806. 



High Team Single 

I. Scratch, 692; 2. Pin Busters 
663; 3. The Outlaws, 660 

Men's High Series 

I. Mark E. Reamsnyder, 596; 2. 
Richard W. Jackson, 576; Troy A. 
Gaugler, 552. 

Men's High Single 

I. Mark E. Reamsnyder, 237; 2. 
Myles S. Murray, 215; 3. Richard W. 
Jackson, 206. 

Women's High Series 
Denise M. McNeil, 475; 2. Denise 
M. King, 401. 

Women's High Single 
Denise M. McNeil, 191; 2. Denise 
M. King, 151. 

Top "5" Averages 
1. Mark E. Reamsnyder, 192; 2. Rudy 
E. Long, 179; 3. Scott R. Kehs, 178; 4. 
Christopher L. Patrick, 168; 5. Barry 
A. Boney, 167. 




lonij-hi • 7:30 p.m 
ACC Audiloriiim 




The Sidelines 



Sports Commentary 

By Rodney D. Hill 

SPOTLIGHT Sports Editor 



rM«.^«HAMM/NMr«tllM I MM <flM>AIWMll«4lN<^M''' 




The stands are filled with arms fly- 
ing loosely in all directions, the roar is 
similar to a Mack Truck without it's 
stacks and with all patience pushed 
aside, all that is important is fighting 
the crowd for a view of the action. 

Now you are at the center of the at- 
tention, it's two hockey teams at center 
ice, in one massive pile. The fight 
doesn't last long because a hockey game 
suddenly breaks out. 

Surely all hockey games are more 
than just fighting, but it's not unusual 
for the two teams to start a gang fight 
during the game. Hockey is a deman- 
ding sport and the players are fortunate 
if they can go through an entire career 
and keep all of their teeth. In a game 
like hockey it doesn't seem as though it 
would take much to provoke a brawl. 
An accidental hit with a hockey stick 
could do that. In some of the other 
sports where tempers flair, the incidents 
are not as easily explained. 

A football game will occasionally 
have a "pretty good" brawl, but for all 
the contact that is made, 1 think the 
players hold their tempers rather well. 
About 10 years ago, the "old" Oakland 
Raiders and the Kansas City Chiefs were 
almost a sure bet to clash in activities 
other than a football game. 

Baseball games are known for 
"gang fights", a fight in baseball will 
normally start after a batter is hit by a 
pitch from the pitcher. Most batters 
tend to take getting hit a little personal, 
then if I was hit by a ball that traveled 
about 90 miles per hour, I would pro- 
bably take it personal too. Other than 
the pile ups at the pitchers mound, the 
game is played by some pretty well 
tempered people. Well, most of them 



have good tempers, Billy Martin with 
his wild tactics, is one exception. 

Some managers and coaches do not 
take defeat as well as others do. They let 
some of their anxieties out a little too 
freely. Billy Martin, after being 
manager of the New York Yankees three 
different limes is no doubt on top of the 
list of sore head skippers. Woody 
Hayes, a one-time coach of the Ohio 
State Buckeyes and a sucessful one at 
that, was a person who would let his 
temper get out of control a lot. Hayes, 
on different occasions and whenever he 
possibly could, would punch an oppos- 
ing player when he was involved in a 
play around the Buckeye bench. 

Although the brawls at sporting 
events break out and the feature 
headline is solely on the brawl, the sport 
is still very much at large in the hearts 
of the atheletes. After the players have 
played into the game so far, the frustra- 
tion sets in and the torment of failing to 
achieve any ground adds to the fatigue 
and frustration of the players. Some 
athletes hide the frustration and some 
make themselves out to be bad men of 
their sports. 

Muhammad Ali, Mark Gastineau, 
Reggie Jackson, and John McEnroe are 
athletes who are known as bad men in 
their respective sports.because of their 
unusual gimmicks. These people seem 
to add something extra to their sports. I 
call it a bit of color, because people 
look when they are acting in their 
unusual ways 

Sometimes those brawls or 
whatever else the attention getter is, 
does break the action of the events and 
sometimes you don't know whether to 
feel sorry or ashamed for those athletes. 




JOIN SKI CLUB 



Organizational Meeting 

Nov. 28, 1984 4 p.m. 

Location: 204 ACC 



Weekly skiing trips, and much, much more 
whether you're a beginner or a pro. 
You will enjoy the skiing of beautiful 
Central Pennsylvania. 



Sorority revising contest rules 
for X-mas decorations by clubs 



SPOTUGHTaMonU;, November 19, IfUDI 



With the upcoming Christmas 
season in mind, Sigmi Phi Omega is 
busy revising the regulations for the 
College's annual decorating contest, ac- 
cording to Mrs. Doreen W. Shope, 
assistant professor of business ad- 
ministration and adviser of the 
organization. 
She said that in the past, the 



sorority has been responsible for 
distributing the regulations and obtain- 
ing the prizes for the contest. "We are 
rewriting the rules to make them easier 
to understand," she added. 

Soon afterwards, the regulations 
will be distributed to division offices and 
club advisers, Mrs. Shope noted. 



Student aid increased over $1M 



Continued from Page /■■■ 
tant reminder that college costs and liv- 
ing expenses are continuing to rise and 
family resources and financial aid pro- 
grams are strained in an attempt to meet 
the needs of the students." 

Rundown of aid totals 
For the rundown of figures in the 
annual report, 1,555 students were 
awarded $1,512,238 in Pell grants, 
1,237 students received $638,049 in 
PHEAA grants, 229 students obtained 
$102,625 in SEOG funds, 205 students 
received $141,796 in College work study 



monies, 33 students benefitted from 
Parent Loans, totalling $67,121. 

Also, 46 students received a total 
of $9,200 in College scholarships, and 
1,885 students borrowed $4,074,013 in 
Guaranteed Student Loans. 

Totals of other aid programs 
amounted to $584,737, including 
$415,996 in veterans benefits, $152,360 
in Agency scholarships, and $16,381 in 
emergency loans. 

Grand total of financial aid receiv- 
ed by College students was $7,167,668, 
the report stated. 




It was erroneously reported in last 
week's edition of "Whaddya Say...?" 
that Kimberiy K. Thompson, of 
WilHamsport, was a service and opera- 
tion of heavy equipment student; when 
in fact, she is a secretarial science stu- 
dent. The SPOTLIGHT regrets the er- 




it s time to register 

with Selective Service. 

It's simple. Just go down to your local 

post office, fill out a card and hand it 

to a postal clerk. 

No. this IS not a draft. No one has 

been drafted in over 10 years. You're 

just adding your name to a list in case 

there's a national emergency. So 

register now. 

Register. 
It's Quick. It's Easy. ^^ 
And it's the Law. |^^ 

Presented as a Public Service Announcement 



ACROSS 
1 Brtdg« term 
5 Cloth 

measure 
8 Musical 

organization 

12 Solicitude 

13 Unit of 
Portuguese 
currency 

14 Century plant 

15 Genus of 
maples 

16 Possessive 
pronoun 

17 One of 
Columbus's 
stiips 

16 Dwell 
20 Shred 

22 Negative 

23 Apportion 

24 Reject 
27 Produce 

31 Man's name 

32 Quotes 

33 Baker's 
product 

34 Made 
bigger 

36Sprlng 

37 Scorch 

38 Preposition 

39 Abate 
42 Looking 

glass 

46 Toward 
shelter 

47 Pedal digit 

49 Food fish 

50 Row 

51 Anger 

52 Girl's name 

53 Direction 

54 Uncouth 
person 

55 Approach 
DOWN 

1 Mark left by 



wound 

2 Intertwine 

3 War god 

4 Breed of 
sheep 

5 Great Lake 

6 Permit 

7 Heeded 

8 Tease lightly 

9 Landed 

10 Not one 

1 1 Loved on 
19 Accomplish 
2 1 The sweet- 
sop 

23 Measuring 
device 

24 Contend 

25 Sea eagle 

26 Hindu 
cymbals 

27 Very big 

28 Simian 

29 Sesame 

30 Lamprey 
32 Algonqulan 





U V 3 hJMo V oWMi S V 3 


V 1 1 3 ms U 1 Hu 3 1 1 


3 10 sHs i 1^3 3 -1 V 


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u3iivi|aa IS3U 


V N 1 nHs 1 1 ■(! 3 3V 


30-|vHl3llH3UV3 


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Indian 41 Observes 

35 Declare 42 Reward: 

36 Become less arch, 
good 43 Pan In play 

38 Note of scale 44 Spanish pot 

39 Tardy 45 Hind pan 

40 Lamb's pen 48 Anglo-Saxon 
name money 



1 


2- 


T- 


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1 


5- 


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7 


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8 


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11 


15 








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17 
















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23 












25 


28 


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28 


29 


30 


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33 












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37 








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43 


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Club Briefs... 



PBL banquet deadline 
set for Nov. 29 

Phi Beta Lambda |PBL| members 
are reminded by club officials to register 
for the annual Christmas banquet to be 
held on Tuesday, Dec. 4. 

To register for the banquet 
members may sign up in the PBL office 
in the Academic Center basement. 

DeadUne to register is Nov. 29, it 
was noted. 

F&H club plan "bash"; 
doughnut sale discussed 

A doughnut sale was one of the subjects 
discussed at the Food and Hospitality 
meeting last week, according to Mrs. 
Sue Bennett, coordinator of food ser- 
vices. 

"It will probably take place 
sometime in December," she said. 

Instead of having a Christmas par- 
ty, an idea of a "back to school bash" 
was considered. In that way, "it won't 
interfere with end-of-semester finals," 
noted Mrs. Bennett. 

Plans for the New York trip were 
also discussed. 



Sigmi Phi Omega 
helps Lung Asso. 

Members of Sigma Phi Omega 
were at the Lycoming Mall last Thurs- 
day to encourage people to contribute 
money to the Central Pennsylvania 
Lung and Health Association, accor- 
ding to Mrs. Doreen W. Shope, assis- 
tant professor of business administra- 
tion and adviser of the organization. 

Mrs. Shope said that the students 
presented the associations' Christmas 
tree near the center of the mall. 



Recruiter here tomorrow 

SFC Rockey J. Lingerfelt, Station 
Commander in WUliamsport for the Ar- 
my, will be holding an orientation from 
8 a.m. to 4 p.m. tomorrow in Room 
205 of the Learning Resources Center. 

Lingerfelt will discuss four main 
topics: guaranteed technical training 
placement, cash bonuses, educational 
assistance, and a loan repayment pro- 
gram. 



SaSPOrilGHTDMoDiliy. Novembtr 19. 1984 

BULLETIN BOARD 

For week of Monday. Nov. 19 through Sunday. Nov. 25 

For the week of Monday, Nov. 19 through Friday, Nov. 23 
MOVIE 
"The Deer Hunter"... 7:30 p.m. this evening, Academic Center Auditoriiun, 
{I admission with validated College ID, $2 admission for all others. 
SPORTS 
Basketball... T\f-0^ Tournament, 8 p.m. today and tomorrow, Tuesday, 
Nov. 20, against Butler County Community College, away. 
MEETINGS 
Sigma Pi Omega.. .i p.m. this Tuesday, Nov. 20, Room B107, Lifelong 
Education Center. 

S&O Association... b p.m., tomorrow, Tuesday, Nov. 20, Room 414, 
Academic Center. 

Phi Beta Lambda.. .i.M p.m., tomorrow, Tuesday, Nov. 20, Room 329, 
Academic Center. 

Alpha Omega Fellowship...! ^.m. to 10 p.m., tomorrow, Tuesday, Nov. 20, 
Room 227, Academic Center. 



THERE IS HELP... 

NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS 

MEETING 

EVERY WEDNESDAY 7 P.M. 

ROOM 118, BUILDING TRADES CENTER 



FREE CLASSIFIEDS 

for students, faculty 

and College employees. 

Drop the classified off 

in Room 7 (The SPOTLIGHT), 

or call Ext. 221, 

This space could be yours! 

WANTED 

Campus rep to run spring break 
vacalion (rip to Daytom Beach. Earn 
free (rip ud money. Send resume (o 
CoUege Travel Unlmiled, P.O. Box 
6063, Station A, Daylona Beach, 
Florida 32022. Include phone numbers 
please. fadvl.I 



Two part-time job opportunities for 
Graphics Arts students, both would be 
suitable for co-op. Pheonix Graphics, 
416 Broad St., Montoursville, PA. 
17754. Call Dale Wagner, owner, at 
368-2619, and Robin Graphics, RD 2, 
Box 158, Cogan Station, PA 17728, 
Call Michael Foster, Owner at 
494-0655. 

Bookstore now accepting applications 
for Bookstore employment from Dec. 
3rd thru Dec. 21st and Jan 2nd thru 
Jan. 3lsl. See Mrs. Eleonore Holcomb, 
Bookstore manager. 

Stonaker's Service Centers. 510 E. Third 
St., would like a student to work daily 8-10 a.m. 
or 8-12 a.m., pumping gas, changing tires, 
waiting on customers and delivering cars. Apply 
at the above address. 

The Placement Office has received in- 
formation regarding summer employ- 
ment at Wall Drug Store in Wall, South 
Dakota and Glacier Park, Inc., in 
Phoenix, Ariz. If interested in applying, 
see Mrs. Elmer in Room 157, LRC. 



Stop and Go, 1037 High Street, 
needs part-time help for clerk/cashier, 
stocking and general work. If interested, 
apply at the above address. 



Dont/ast 

get a /oh with 

your special skills. 



lllllillllgllllillllilllllillllllllllllmlllllillilllllllllllMll 




Get an 
advantage! 



A specific job guarantee, 
accelerated promotions and 
a possible bonus are.jusi 
the start With our new 
College Enlistment Program, 
your high school diploma 
and special skdls u-aining 
pay off from die beginning, proof thai your special skill means 
someUiing to die Corps. 

For example, your specialized training could guarantee you 
a job such as metal worker, electrician or consU'uction sun'eyor 
just to name a few of die 260 select jobs you could qualify for. 

Also, by getting accelerated promotions. you'U be making 
more money from die day you finish recruit vaimng V'our first 



rank will be private first class. 
Widiin 6 montfis you'll be pro- 
moted to lance corporal. If you 
qualify, you could make corpo- 
lal widiin 13 mondis Higher 
rank, higher pay 

Another advantage of our 
College Enhstment Program is die chance to get a bonus. Whedier 
you qualify for one depends on die MOS you choose 

The advantages addupquicklyinour College Enlistment 
Program. And if you qualify, you'll have an ad\antage for life 
lew odiers can claim — die self-confidence and respect diat 
come widi earning die title United States Marine 



The Marines are looking for a few good meiu 

For More Information Call: GySgt Schuette at 717-782-7296 



Spotlight 



Tacsday, Novembtr 27,1984 • Vol. 20, No. 15 • 4 PijM 
Wniiamsport Area Communily College • Williamsporl, Pa. 17701 



Vocational students gain experience 
at Little League construction site 

Courtesy College Information Office 

A mutually beneficial partnership has developed between Little League - 
Baseball, Inc. and high school students enrolled in the College's Secondary Voca- 
tional Program. 

According to Dr. William J. Martin, director of the secondary program, for a 
number of years College students in the construction trades have worked on a 
number of building projects at the International Grove Headquarters of Little 
League Baseball. More recently, secondary students at the Colleee have been hard 
at work to help Little League Baseball, Inc. reach its goal of a new summer camp. 
Camp located a) Green Acres 

The camp, which has been designed to be expandable, is located at a picturesque 
area known as Green Acres, near Hillsgrove in Sullivan County. 

In the Spring of 1979, secondary vocational students of the College began the 
construction of a two-car garage for vehicle storage and maintaince. The following 
Spring, students undertook the construction of the first of eight cottages to house 
the Little League Baseball campers. The current class of secondary students com- 
pleted the final cottage last year. Each cottage has two rooms and can house a max- 
imum of 20 campers with their counselors. 
Several hundred students involved 

Since the beginning of the project, several hundred secondary students from 
the College have participated in one phase or another of the construction. Students 
have come from Canton, Jersey Shore, Millville Area, East Lycoming, Keystone 
Central, Montgomery, Montoursville, Southern Tioga, South Williamsport, 
Sullivan Countv. Warrior Run, Wellsboro, and Williamsport school districts, all 
sponsors of the College's secondary program. Secondary students in three shops 
areas nave participated in the project over tne years, Dr. Martin noted. Students 
from the Masonry program have poured the foundation for all the buildings; 
Carpentry students have erected the cottages and they have provided the elec- 
and exterior construction; electrical construction students have provided the elec- 
trical services. 

Dr. Martin said the arrangement between Little League Baseball, Inc. and the 
College calls for Little League to provide transportation of the students to the 
building site and all the materials required on-the-job. The students provide the 
labor, and in the process, acquire competencies in their trade area. 

Upon arrival at the College in the morning, students are bused to the 
Hillsgrove site about 32 miles from the campus. Lessons learned in theory in the 
classroom and hands-on in the shop are reinforced by direct application at the con- 
struction site. 

Dr. Martin said. "Students benefit doubly because they gain practical ex- 
periences in their occupational area in circumstances which would be impossible to 
duplicate in the normal shop settings, and they also acquire a strong sense of pride 
in the work they do." He also noted that Little League Inc. and the community as a 
whole benefit from off-campus projects such as these. 

According to Stephen D. Keener, public relations director at Little League, 
Inc., "Eighty Little Leaguers at a time can now enjoy the benefits of the camp, 
four sessions, two weeks each, are held in the summer, July I through Aug. 31, so 
that by the end of the summer, 320 Little League baseball players have utilized the 
instructional camp. Little Leaguers attending the camp learn the skills, rules andi 
knowledge needed to be a better baseball player. 

Dr. Martin observed that when the cottages are completed, the secondary 
Masonry students face the formidable task of construction of a shower and 
lavaratory facility for the camp. When the project is completed, "Little Leaguers 
from all over the country will benefit by use of the facility," Dr. Martin said and 
added, "Secondary students involved in this project can take pride in performing 
this service to the community." 

He also noted that secondary students enrolled in other programs have par- 
ticipated in various off<ampus projects: Carpentry students have done renovations 
on several buildings at Camp Kiwanis, lavatory facility for Nippenose Township 
Community Park, construction of interior partitions for a vehicle storage facility at 
the Susquehanna Township building, a number of access ramps for wheelchair per- 
sons, renovation of buildings of the Little League field for the Jersey Shore Lions 
Club and building picnic tables in the same areas, construction of pavilions for 
Antes Fort Communily Park, and construction of a stage for the Susquehanna 
Boom Festival. 





The old cafeteria in the Academic Center is now taking shape for use by the 
Graphic Arts Atfitlmenl.lSPOTLlGHT photo by Gisela D. Orassleyj 

Students urged to participate 
in Good Neighbor Campaign 

/Editor 's note: This is a memo submitted to the SPOTLIGHT by Mrs. JoAnn 
R. Fremioiti, coordinator of intramural athletics and College activities./ 

I urge all students to participate in a Good Neighbor Campaign. Student, I re- 
mind you, that you are living in a communily and encourage you to treat your- 
neighbors with kindness, consideration and respect. 

For most of you, this is your residence for only a short period of time while 
you attend the College. However, this is a full-time residence for many of our 
neighbors-a place they call home. You know what your home neighborhood is 
like. The Williamsport residents also want a pleasant neighborhood. Remember to 
think before you act-would you like someone like yourself to live next door to you 
at home? 



17 Radio stations listed 
for College snow closings 

With the deep winter approaching 
usually comes inclement weather-such 
as snow and ice storms-and there are 17 
radio stations available to College 
students, faculty and staff to announce 
when the College closes due to adverse 
weather conditions. 

Stations in the Greater 
Williamsport area are WWPA, WRAK, 
WILQ, WKSB and WLYC. South 
Williamsport's WFXX is also available. 

Other area stations are WSQV of 
Jersey Shore, WBPZ of Lock Haven, 
WMLP of Milton, WPGM of Danville, 
WQBQ of Selinsgrove, and J 104 of 
Muncy. 

Stations in surrounding counties 
that will also carry the College closing 
announcement are WFRM in 
Coudersport, WATS in Sayre, WKOK 
in Sunbury, WTTC in Towanda, and 
WNBT in Wellsboro. 

DEADLINE for appticalions for jobs in tfie 
Bookstore during December and January rush 
is tomorrow (Nov. 28) 

INTERVIEWS for those applying for jobs will 
be in the Boolcslore Friday between 10 a.m. 
and 2 p.m. 



Reservations a requirement 
for Christmas party 

The Susquehanna Room will be 
transformed into a "hoHday ballroom" 
when the Christmas party for College 
employees kicks off at 9 p.m., Satur- 
day, Dec. 15. 

Included in the celebration will be 
an array of hot and cold hors d'oeuvres, 
and dance music, which is planned to be 
a disc jockey show. 

Reservations must be made by next 
Wednesday, Dec. 5, and given to Mrs. 
Virginia M. Missigman, purchasing 
assistant. The cost is $5 per person, and 
each employee may bring their spouse 
or a guest. 



Mr. Cillo: 

Take your medicine and get 
plenty of rest and think 
positively-you have us again next 
semester! 

Your JO students 



2DSP0TllGHTDTiiMdiy, Novtmber 11. 1984 



iCommentary^ 



Attendance policy unrealistic; 
unfair if meeting requirements 

^SPOTLIGHT on-campus edltorlal-4 

The College attendance policy states that i( a student misses class hours 
amounting to one week of classes and is not adequately meeting the course ob- 
jectives, the instructor may recommend the student withdraw from that class 

There are instructors at the College who carry this rule to extremes. The 
word may figures very prominently in that sentence, yet many instructors seem to 
look past'it and threaten to kick students out of the class if they miss, even if the 
student is meeting course requirements. 

Other ratponslblllllet may supersede attendance 

The College is a technical training and re-training school. The average age of 
students is older than at most other colleges, and thus many students have 
responsibilities that go beyond their college schedules. 

Many students have to balance their time between job and home respon- 
sibilities. These students need to prioritize what is most important to them, and 
sometimes school Is not at the lop of the list. 

As long as course objectives are being met. no matter how many classes are 
missed, what right does the instructor (who is indirectly being paid by the 
students) have to kick a student out of a class? 

Sponsorship argument addressed to money 

An argument heard concerning support for the attendance policy relates to 
the way sponsorship is set up For students from sponsoring districts, the state 
pays one third of their tuition, the sponsor one third, and the student one third. If 
the student misses class, then the state and sponsor are not getting their money's 
worth. 

However, the attendance policy also pertains to students who pay two-thirds 
or the full amount of their tuition. 

Why harp on attendance of good students? 

The responsibility ol fulfilling course requirements falls on the student. As 
long as requirements are met. it is ludicrous to boot a student out of a class bas- 
ed on a useless alterdance policy. The policy is self-defeating and counter- 
productive to educational goals. 




Cartoon by 
John C. Parlante 
A general studies student from Williamsport 
Cartoons, leners to the editor, and other corr)menlary-type material for publica- 
tion may be submitted to the editorial page editor ol the Spotlight, at Room 7 ol 
the Academic Center, by noon Tuesday before the next date ol publication. 



SPOTLIGHT 
Tuesday, Nov. 27. 1984 - Vol. 20, No. 15 

The SPOTLiGHT is published each Monday 
morning of the academic yeaf, except tor Col- 
lege vacations, by lournallsm and other In- 
terested students ot The Wiiliamsporl Area Com- 
munity College 

Office Room 7, Academic Center, 1005 
W Third St, Williamsport. Pa 17701 
Telephone: (717) 326-3761, Extension 221 



Opinions expressed ere those of the student 
newspaper or ot those whose names accom- 
pany items. Opinions do not reflect official opi- 
nion ot the institution. 



THE STAFF 

Donna M Barnetl, Managing Editor 

Karen M Metarko. Editorial Page Editor 

Gisela D Grassley. Photograpl^y Editor 

Mark S Schwanke. Administrative Altairs Editor 

James K Morrissey. Student Altairs Editor 

Kathryn M Gilbert, Advertising Manager 

Rodney D Hill. Sporls Editor 
Richard E Kopp Jr . Senior Stalt Writer 

REPORTERSfSTAFF ASSOCIATES 

Wanna F Brown, Meianie S Callahan, 
Kathleen L Eiswert, Anne T Morateiii, Sandra L 
Musgrave, Sandra R Taylor, James E Treese 
Jennifer S White, LeRoy S Whitmire Jr 

Faculty adviser Anthony N Cillo 



Produellon Staff This Issue 

Mark S Schwanke, production superviser; Don- 
na M Barnett, videocomposition; James K Mor 
rissey, copy editor. 



College graduate benefits 
from previous in-service training 

Courtesy College Information Office 

From college student to general manager and executive chef of a country club 
n three years, Robert J. Sassani, 75 Fisher Court, Danville, gives a lot of credit to 
js alma mater, the Willliamsport Area Community College. Sassani, who was 
graduated from the College's Food and Hospitality Management program in 1981 
says, "When I enrolled at the College in 1979 at the age of 18, 1 had absolutely no 
background in my field. The program at the College is so well structured and the 
instructors so concerned with their students that I was able to reach my maximum 
skills. I found that students in my field received a great deal of individualized in- 
struction and if I had to attribute my success to one thing, it would be the personal 
attention I received. Having worked along side students from major universities I. 
know that Williamsport Area Community College students do not have to take a 
back seat to anyone." 

The program also requires extensive in-service training and Sassani says he 
benefitted greatly from those experiences. A major portion of his in-service was 
spent at the Hillside Restaurant, Williamsport. 

While still a student in the College's two-year associate degree Food and 
Hospitality Management program, Sassani was hired by E.J.'s Speak E Z of 
Williamsport. E.J.'s came to the College looking for a student to hire and Mrs. 
Ann Miglio, instructor, recommended Sassani. From his position of assistant 
manager of E.J.'s, Sassani went to the position of assistant chef for the Bradley 
House of Catering in Wexford, (Pittsburgh area). Just prior to accepting his cur- 
rent position at the Frosty Valley Country Club, RD7, Danville, Sassani worked as 
sous chef at the Sheraton at Danville. 

At the Frosty Valley Country Club, Sassani is in charge of the entire food and 
beverage operation, handles all facets of the catering operation and does the hiring 
and firing. He reports directly to the Board of Directors. 

in the past couple of years, membership at the Club has grown substantially 
and as a result, the Board of Directors decided to make major expansions. The 
facility now boasts a spacious dining room, a private dining facility, double service 
bar, md'dernized locker room facilities, and enlarged kitchen facilities. The kitchen 
facilities alone have more than doubled. Sassani, who participated in the desip 
and renovations plans for the facility, is in large part responsible for enlarging the 
food sevices and catering operations. Both operations are enjoying finanical and 
popular success. Under Sassani's guidance, the catering operation has been ex- 
anded throughout the Club's service area. 

The Country Club, a large private club, services the areas in and around Ber- 
wick, Bloomsburg, Danville, Shamokin, Selinsgrove and Sunbury. It has four 
types of memberships; pool, tennis, golfing, and social, and has 475 family 
memberships. 

Sassani says it is one of the strongest Clubs in that area for "quite a few 
miles." Management hopes to keep the Club open 12 months a year in the near 
future. It has been a seven-month operation in the past but this year has already 
gone well past the usual seven. 

Sassani says that "by understanding my field so well, I have been able to help 
other employees reach their maximum potential as well." This has also helped him 
succeed in his job. He feels his ability to work with and help others in the field is 
just another bonus of his training at the College. Not only does he recommend the 
College to his friends, a number of them, he says, are "already going that route." 

The 23-year-old was born near Philadelphia, the son of Mr. and Mrs. Patrick 
Sassani of 117 First Street, Danville. He was raised in Kulpmont in Nor- 
thumberiand County and was graduated from Our Lady of Lourdes Regional High 
School in Shamokin in 1979. 



iCartoons, letter to the editor, and other commentary-type 
material for publication may be submitted to the editorial 
page editor of the Spotlight, at Room 7 of the Academic 
Center, by noon Tuesday before the next date of publica- 
tion. 



BENSON 



Ofil mini. ^ 
l^tn market 



Corner of 3rd and Maynard Sts. 




Always Open 
All night. Holidays, and Sundays 




SPOTLICHTnTuesdiy, November 27, 1984: 



The Sidelines 



Sports Commentary 

By Rodney D. Hill 

SPOTLIGHT Sports Editor 




The 1984-85 basketball season has 
started at the Williamsport Area Com- 
munity College. The College's team will 
play four games next week. 

This is obviously the last season for 
the sport and all intercollegiate sports 
for that matter. The College ad- 
ministration does not believe there is 
enough interest for intercollegiate sports 
to continue. 



Dontjust i 

get a job with 

your special skills. 




Get an 
advantage! 



A specific job guarantee, 
accelerated promotions and 
a possible bonus are just 
the start. With our new 
College Enlistment Program, 
your high school diploma 
and special skills training 
pay off from the beginning, proof that your special skill means 
something to the Corps, 

For example, your specialized tt^ning could guarantee you 
a job such as metal worker, electrician or consuuction surveyor 
just to name a few of the 260 select jobs you could qualify for 

Also, by getUng accelerated promoUons, you'll be making 
more money from the day you finish recruit training. Your first 



rank will be private first class, 
Widiin 6 months you'll be pro- 
moted to lance corporal If you 
qualify, you could make corpo- 
ral within 1 } months Higher 
rank, higher pay 

Another advantage of our 
College Enli.stmenl Program is the chance to gel a bonus Whether 
you qualify for one depends on the MOS you choose. 

The adianlagcs add up quickly in our CoUege EnlisUnent 
Program, And if you qualify, you'll have an advantage for life 
few others can claim — the self-confidence and respect dial 
come with earning the title United States Marine 



The Marines an hokitig for a kw good mm. 

For More Information Call: GySgt Schuette at 717-782-7296 



The College has four sports and 
only so many persons can be members 
of the teams. The teams are filled and in 
some cases, the teams have to be trimm- 
ed (players cut), so in that respect, in- 
tercollegiate sports are rather successful. 

The intercollegiate sports program 
has been a part of this College since its 
existence in 1965. The Williamsport 
Area Community College is a bit uni- 
que in its own way, because of the 
educational programs that are offered 
and the chance to compete in inter- 
collegiate sports. 

Since it is impossible for a large 
amount of students to be members of 
the athletic teams and the basketball 
season is in, those who are interested in 
the sports program can represent it by a 
spectator standpoint. 

Men's basketball is the only sport 
that attracts spectators in the College's 
intercollegiate sports program. Those 
who really feel the program is important 
can represent the program by attending 
and giving support to the basketball 
team. Admission to the games is free 
with student ID. 



Sports Schedule 



Intramural Sports 

Basketball Tournament 

Tuesday: Knights vs. Payton 
Gang; Panthers vs. Big Mac Attack; 
Warriors vs. Freeze. All games at 8 
p.m. 

Wednesday: Moondogs vs. Corro- 
sion, 5 p.m. 

Thursday: The losers of Tuesday 
and Wednesday games play at 7 p.m. 



Intramural Basketball 
Standings 

East Division 

1. G'town, nine wins, no losses. 

2. Knights, five wins, four losses. 

3. Freeze, two wins, seven losses. 

4. Warriors, one win, eight losses. 

West Division 

1. Yuk-A-Roidz, seven wins, two 
losses. 

2. Bums, six wins, three losses. 

3. Payton Gang, four wins, five losses. 

4. Corrosion, three wins, six losses. 

Note: The two division winners will play 
a best of three series to determine the 
league champions. 



4a$POTLIGHTDTiie94la)'. November 27. 1984 




SSgf. Bill Hoke of Wllliamsporl 
shows William M. Seip. an eleclrnnics 
sludenl from Middlehurg, how Ihe Ar- 
my can help wilh college tuition. 

NYC bus trips reminder 

Mrs. JoAnn R. Fremiolli, coor- 
dinalor of intramural athlelics and Col- 
lege activities issued a reminder that 
anyone going on the bus trips to New 
York City on Saturdays, Dec. I and 8 
should be ready to meet the bus at 6 
a.m. at the Learning Resources Center 
bus loop. "There will be no slops along 
the way. The bus will drop everyone off 
on the Fifth Avenue side of St. Patrick's 
Cathedral. The bus will leave Ihe city at 
9 p.m. from the same location on both 
dales," said Mrs. Fremiotti. 

She further stated that there was no 
planned itinerary for both trips and that 
maps to the city would be provided for 
all. 

FREf 

Buy One PIZZA 
Get One FREE! 



(§)MsM@mmJ!^^ 



Sheraton is site 
of PBL formal 

The eighth annual Phi Beta Lamb- 
da (PBL) formal Christmas dinner and 
dance will be held on Tuesday, Dec. 4 
at 6:30 p.m. in the Seasons dining room 
of the Sheraton Motor Inn in downtown 
Williamsport, according to David E. 
Davenport Jr., a business management 
student from South Williamsport. 

Over 70 members and guests are 
expected to attend this event. 

Social hour is scheduled to begin at 
6:30 p.m. and dinner will be served at 
7:30 p.m. 

Music will be provided by Ronald 
J. Wright, a broadcasting student from 
Williamsport. 

Chairperson of the social commit- 
tee is Myra K. Sindlinger, a business 
management sludenl of Liberty. Com- 
mittee members are: Judy L. Brokaw, a 
computer science sludenl from Canton; 
Brenda S. Cole, a computer science stu- 
dent from Williamsport; Tammy L. 
Hassinger, an accounting sludenl from 
Millmont; Ceylon (Lonnie) S. Reinard, 
an accounting student from Port 
Trevorton; and Brenda J. Wolfe, a 
computer science student from Mon- 
toursville. 

College handicapped study 
set; participation urged 

Any handicapped student in- 
terested in participating in a College 
self-study concering prevention of 
discrimination for the handicapped, 
may contact Lawrence W. Emery Jr., 
director of counseling, career develop- 
ment and placement. 

The study is being made due to a 
requirement in accordance with Section 
504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973. 

Emery may be contacted in Room 
157, Learning Resources Center, Ext. 
246. 



' J Cillo's 

^ College Corner 



We'll prepare your 
favorite Subs and Burgers 
the way you like them! 




Play LUCKY NUMBERS 

and 

win a half sub 

plus medium drink 

Four Winners 
Every Week 

Cillo'i Colktt Comer 
1100 W Tbito S( . Williiintpon 
(Nc»l to Academic Ctnler) 
Phone Aheid: J!M.121 



^cggx^o-/ Mon.-Thun. 7:M a.m. lo 6:00 p.m. 
y Fn. l:»p.m. loS:]Op.m. 



Emei7 to discuss placement 
with fourth semester students 

On Wednesday, Dec. 5, l^wrence 
W. Emery Jr. will meet with fourth 
semester students at 10 a.m. and again 
at 3:30 p.m. in the Academic Center 
auditorium to explain the function of 
the Placement OHice and to collect 
cards for employment notices, accor- 
ding to information provided by Emery. 

Any students wiio are graduating at 
the end of the semester and have not fill- 
ed out cards for employment notices 
should meet with Emery at this time to 
do so, according to the information. 

Cafeteria closes for Xmas 

With the approaching holiday 
season, the Susquehanna Room will be 
closing for Christmas vacation on Fri- 
day, Dec. 21 at 3:00 p.m., according to 
John Vitali, director of College food 
services. 

The cafeteria will reopen on 
Wednesday, Jan. 2 at 7 a.m., even- 
though students will not resume classes 
. until Tuesday, Jan. 8. 



Dr. Breuder tags 
second bruin 

Shooting what looked "like 
a M-1 tank". Dr. Robert L. 
Breuder, College president, tagged 
the second bear of his hunting 
career last Monday morning while 
in Ihe northern end of Ralston. 

The 429-pound bruin was the 
second largest known killed in the 
area for the 1984 season. The 
record weight at press time was 
484 pounds. 

Dr. Breuder brought his prize 
to the parking lot of Ihe Main 
Campus last Tuesday afternoon, 
on his way "lo the butcher" in 
Jersey Shore. 

The president, in his hunting 
garb while describing the scene, 
slated thai the animal was about 
80 yards away from him and was 
running sideways down a cliff. 
Dr. Breuder's first shot hit the 
bear's left shoulder, and he "shot 
three or four more times to bring 
the bear down." 

Dr. Breuder noted that after 
the 7:50 a.m. shooting, four men 
labored three hours, dragging the 
bear 400 yards to the nearest vehi- 
cle. 

Dr. Breuder shot his first 
bear in 1969, a "small one", 
weighing about 175 pounds, he 
noted. 

When asked about Ihe future 
plans for the bear, Dr. Breuder 
was undecided, but said that the 
bear would be skinned out and the 
meat frozen, and joked that a new 
special would be added at the Sus- 
quehanna Room: Bearburgers. 



Opera turnout large; 
future events planned 

Over 200 people attended the 
Camerala Opera Theater's performance 
of the comic opera, "H.M.S. 
Pinafore," Saturday, Nov. 17 in the 
Academic Center Auditorium. 

The event drew an "appreciative" 
audience, according to Mrs. JoAnn R. 
Fremiotti, coordinator of intramural 
athletics and College activities. 

Mrs. Fremiotti also noted that the 
College's Special Events Committee, 
sponsor of the performance, will 
schedule most future special events on 
weekends because "they are a more 
convenient time for students, faculty, 
and staff to attend due to less conflicts 
with work and classes." 

The Special Events Committee is 
also tentatively scheduling cultural 
events for the 1985 Spring semester. 

These include the Metropolitan 
Brass Quintet in early February, Rod 
Rodgers Dance company in March, and 
Mary Tooke, singer and Celtic harpist 
in April. "The Eighth Annual Bluegrass 
Festival is tentatively scheduled late in 
the Spring semester," she added. 




m 



The speed of a pant tortoise is . 17 
miles per hour. 

Bookstore now accepting applications for bookstore employment from Dec. 3, thru 
Dec 21 thru January 2nd thru January 31st. See Mrs. Holcomb, Bookstore 
Manager. 



STONEY STEAMER'S 

WORLD FAMOUS HOT DOGS 

Steamed in Beer! 




Dec.5, 10:00-2:00 Academic Center 

Sponsored by ARTIST UNLIMITED 



Spotlight 

Mooday, December 3, 1984 • Vol. 20, No. 16 • 4 Psges 
WiHiamsporl Area Community College • WiUiamsporl. Pa. 17701 



Professional Development Center 
about 40 percent complete 

Courtesy Colleee Information Office 

As winter approaches, students in the College's construction technology divi- 
sion are busy completing a temporary roof on the Professional Development 
Center. By doing this, students will be able to continue working on the interior of 
the building this winter. 

The 10,000 square foot center is being constructed by the College students on 
campus and is providing students in a number of curriculums with a unique and 
valuable learning experience. 

Designed by the College's architectural technology students, the center offers a 
challenging project - even to the experienced builder. For example, more than 12 
angles other than 90 degrees are being used and special brick had to be manufac- 
tured for interior and exterior angles. The building is also designed in a way to take 
advantage of passive solar energy. The special applications of electrical, plumbing, 
heating and air handling equipment will serve several purposes. From an instruc- 
tional point the building provides students the practical experience of installing 
various mechanical systems within the same building. It will also allow future 
students the ooportunity to troubleshoot and maintain these systems within a con- 
trolled educational setting, but as an integral part of a fully-used building. 

After the center is completed. College-hosted meetings, conferences and 
seminars will provide students in the College's food service programs an opportuni- 
ty to practice their culinary skills. Community groups will also benefit from use of 
the building and organizations such as the Chamber of Commerce will find it a 
valuable recruitment tool as the center will stand as a permanent testimonial to 
skills taught at the College. It will provide a living demonstration of the College's 
ability to train the area's labor force. Presently about 60 students from the con- 
struction carpentry, carpentry and building construction technology, electrical oc- 
cupations, and plumbing and heating programs are working on the building. In 
January, air conditioning and refrigeration students will go to work on the project 
when they begin rough-ins for the heating, ventilation and air conditioning equip- 
ment. 

Students have been working on the exterior walls this fall, putting up brick and 
block. All exterior block work has been completed and brick work is about 50 per- 
cent complete. Students are currently working on "framing" the main entrance. 

Plans call for the students to complete the interior walls and partitions this 
winter and to install a fireplace. Masonry students will be going to the state forest 
lands to locate mountain stone for the floor-to-ceiling fireplace. Students will con- 
tinue to work on electrical and plumbing rough-ins this winter. They'll also install 
furring stnps in preparation tor the finished wall materials. 

Work is currently ahead of schedule on the project which is slated for comple- 
tion in the Fall of 1986. 

Obviously the project is of great benefit to the students as an educational ex- 
perience. It has also provided a number of manufacturers with an opportunity to 
become directly involved in the educational process. Several corporations have been 
so impressed with the potential of the project as a learning experience that they have 
made sizeable contributions of materials, equipment and supplies. 



^. 



Microcomputer courses 
to be offered next semester 

Four new, one credit - 24 hour courses in microcomputers will be added to the 
Business and Computer Technologies Division next semester, aaording to Dr. 
Donald B. Bergerstock, division director. 

The courses offered are; microcomputer fundamentals, CSC 299 a 
prerequisihe for the other three; word processing for microcomputers, CSC 299 B; 
data base for microcomputers, CSC 299 D, and 299 D, and spreadsheet for 
microcomputers, CSC 299 E. 

Three microcomputers labs have been set up, one in the Academic Center and 
two in the Lifelong Education Center (LEC). 
Course Description Day Date Time 

CSC 299A-25 microcomputer 4wks TWH Jan 8-31 4:30-6:30 p.m.' 

CSC 299A-26 microcomputer 4wks TWH Feb 5-28 4:30-6:30 p.m. 

fundamentals 
CSC 299A-70 microcomputer 6wks Sat Feb 23- 9 a.m.-l p.m. 

fundamentals Mar 30 

CSC 299A-71 microcomputer 2wk Fri Feb 8-15 6-9 p.m. 

fundamentals ends Sal Feb 9-16 9 a.m.-l2 p.m. 
Sun Feb 10-17 10 a.m.-l p.m. 
CSC 299A-01 microcomputer 6wks W Feb 6- 1-5 p.m. 

fundamentals Mar 6 

CSC 299A-27 microcomputer 4wks TWH Apr 2-25 7-9 p.m. 

fundamentals 
CSC 2^B-29 Word Process. 4wks Sat Feb 5-28 6:30-8:30 p.m. 
for microcomputers 

9 a.m. -I p.m. 



CSC 299B-72 Word Process. 6wks Sat Feb 23- 
(oi microcomputers 

CSC 299D-28 Data Base for 4wks TWH Mar 5-28 4:30-6:30 p.m. 



Mar 23 



CSC 299E-02 spreadsheet 6wks W Mar 20- 1-5 p.m. 

for microcomputers Apr 24 

CSC 299E-73 spreadsheet 2wk F Apr 12-19 6-9 p.m. 

for mc. ends Sat Apr 13-20 9 a.m. -12 p.m. 

1-4 p.m. 
Sun Apr 14-21 10 a.m.-l p.m. 
CSC 299A microcomputer 6wks TH Mar 12-14 7-9 p.m. 

fundamentals ■ Mar 19-21 

Mar 26-28 
Apr 24 
Apr 9-1 • 
Apr 16-18 



CSC 299B Word process. 6wks TH Apr 23-25 7-9 p.m. 
for microcomputers 



Apr 23-May 2 

May 7-9 

May 14-16 

May 21-23 

May 28-30 




'Holiday Cheer': time running out 



Stadenl builders of the Professional Developmenl Ceater reached the 
building's high point in September, and topped it with the traditional tree. 



Mrs. JoAnn R. Fremiotli, coordinator 
of intramural athletics and College ac- 
tivities, reminded all College offices and 
organizations participating in this year's 
"Holiday Cheer" Decorating Contest 
to have their areas decorated by 4 p.m. 
next Wednesday, Dec. 12, as judging 
will take place ihe next day. 

"Those competing should fill out 
the form on Ihe bottom of the green 
memo sent to them earlier and return it 
to the appropriate person as soon as 
possible," said Mrs. Fremiotti. 

The contest is co-sponsored by the 
Sigma Pi Omega and the Circle K Club 
through the Intramural Athletics and 
College Activities Office. Prizes are 



awarded for the best decorations. The 
contest is divided into four prize 
categories: Most Unique, Most Old 
Fashioned, Most Attractive, and Mer- 
riest. 



Mr. Cillo: 

Get lots of rest and listen to 
your sister. 

Thanks for Ihe letter! 
Your JO sludenls 



laSPOTUGHTDMoodiy, Decemtwr 3, 19»4 

^Commentary 

Crime victim's cries Sprinkles of doubt result in murder indictment 
answered by support y^ hiahlv-publiclzed family slaying 

on state, local scale ^ ^ <- _. 



Our society is such Ihal when one 
is the victim of a violent crime, such as 
a mugging, stabbing, or rape, he is 
sometimes subjected to more humilia- 
tion and agitation than the criminal who 
has actually committed the oMense 

Due to the high amount o( stress 
and emotional upheaval that seeking 
justice to penalize the criminal can 
cause, the victim may become 
frightened about being alone, or feel 
isolated because he sees no one to 
help with getting his life back in order. 

And sometimes, the victim, when 
mulling over the attack, feels he may 
have been responsible for what has 
happened, and is sometimes made to 
feel that he has encouraged the crime 
in some way 

The victim may carry the scars o( 
the crime for the rest of his life, but the 
attacker, in many cases, only tem- 
porarily pays his dues and then is free 
to continue with his life. 

During this period following the 
crime, it is important for the victim to 
seek counseling or to be involved with 
a support group ot people who have 
had similiar experiences These 
groups and trained counselors can 
help the victim realize that he is not 
alone and that someone understands 
him. 

In this state, there is a State Crime 
Victim Board, where the victim may 
turn for financial help If injured during a 
crime. The offense has to be reported 
to the police within 72 hours after the 
wrongdoing, and can be filed with the 
state within a year. 

On a closer-lo-home scale, 
Williamsport offers a program called 
Wise Options for Women, a 24-hour 
hotline for victims of crimes, that can 
be reached at 326-8555 



Book review on 'Fatal Vision' by Kathleen L. Eiswert, SPOTLIGHT staff writer 

"I did not kill my family - I loved 
my wife more than anything in the 
world." repeated Jeff fVlacDonald al his 
final hearing in front of the United 
States Supreme Court after he was in 
dieted for the murders of his family 

This scene ended "Fatal Vision." 
a movie televised in early November. 
The film, based on the book of the 
same name, details one of the more 
controversial murder mysteries of the 
early-seventies 

IVIacDonald. a Green Beret, 
respected physician and an "all 
American type guy" was found guilty 
in the bloody murders of his wife Col- 
ette, and daughters Kimberly. 5. and 
Kristen. 2. at the army-based home in 
Fort Bragg. N.C 

Testimony beginnings 

Jeff had told the jury that he saw 
the murderers on that fateful February 
evening when he was awakened by his 
wife's screaming, and claimed that the 
four assasins were an "LSD-induced" 
hippy gang. While he escaped with on- 
ly minor injuries, his wife and 
daughters were stabbed repeatedly 
with a knife and an ice pick, and suf- 
fered severe blows to their heads with 
a baseball bat. Why would the killers 
leave Jeff alive as a probable witness? 
Jeff alleged. "They punched me a few 
times and stabbed me with an ice pick 
and I passed out. They probably 
thought I was dead." 

Without a doubt to his story, the in- 
vestigation began. Since there were no 
witnesses, a large group of "hippies" 
were questioned along with neighbors, 
chemical tests were done, and blood 
samples taken. 

Investigators prod Jeff's story 
According to the chief of the Ar- 
my's Criminal Investigation Division. 



very little of Jeff's story was believable, 
compared with the findings found in 
the home For example, nothing in the 
home had been out of place. In addi- 
tion, the neighbors questioned said 
they didn't hear or see anything out of 
the ordinary. As a result. Jeff was con- 
sidered a suspect in the murder of his 
family. 

Jeff's remaining family was appall- 
ed. His father-in-law stated, "Even if I 
had another daughter, I'd have her 
marry the same man." His mother 
stressed, "l^y son is a good boy - he is 
definitely not capable of such horri- 
ble thing." 

Jeff was examined by a board of 
military psychiatrists, who found no 
evidence of a "mental disease" and 
considered it "unlikely" that Jeff was 
the killer Afterwards, it was concluded 
by the investigating officer that the 
charges be dropped due to a "lack of 
sufficent evidence" 

Family's eye-opener on TV 

Gaining nationwide attention. Jeff 
.appeared on a talk show where he was 
interviewed about the slayings. While 
he was being off-handish and making 
jokes to the TV audience, his father-in- 
law was home watching the broadcast. 
Ivluch to his surprise, he noticed varia- 
tions in Jeffs story. 

With a bothersome curiosity, the 
in-law began comparing reports of 
Jeff's previous hearing and noted 
many "odd instances" in his 
testimonies- 

He said. "No one has studied this 
case as much as I have. I live with it 



day and night No one was as convinc- 
ed of Jeff's innocence as I until I read 
the transcripts of the hearings. After 
two years and eight months of in- 
vestigation and reviews, we don't think 
we are being unreasonable in wanting 
that case to now go forward. This is 
what we want done, and the guilty par- 
ty should be punished." 

Trial moved to higher court 
Ivlany months passed before Jeff 
testified in front of the grand jury in the 
Eastern district of North Carolina. At 
this hearing, another psychiatrist found 
him to have a "paranoid-type 
psychosis" After cross-examinations 
from family, friends, past teachers and 
psychiatrists, the grand jury returned 
an indictment charging Jeff with three 
counts of murder. 

With Jeff's angered lawyer filing 
motions and seeking dismissal on con- 
stitutional grounds and adding Ihal the 
trial was speedy, the indictment was 
dismissed. 

However, the justice department 
considered that there was some un- 
finished business, so the trial was peti- 
tioned into the United Slates Supreme 
Court. 

After seven weeks of arguing, 
tears, evidence and many testimonies. 
Jeff IvIacDonald was found guilty in the 
deaths of his wife and two daughters. 

Currently secured in prison, he is 
serving a life-term, but will be eligible 
for parole in 1 991 . 



College's SGA lacking; 
students' fair share argued 



A Student Government Associa- 
tion (SGA) is designed to represent the 
student body in its best interest and to 
be available lor student representation 

The biggest part of the student 
body at the College is not aware of the 
SGA. although it did render one 
notable decision: voting to discontinue 
intercollegiate sports. That decision 
was not a very popular one. either 

The SGA is alloted $1 2.000 per year 
from the student activity budget to 
operate. And the students are not get- 
ting their money's worth for what the 
SGA offers. 

The SGA does sponsor a movie 
every fvlonday. but if a student should 
forget his College ID. he will be forced 
to pay another dollar beyond the 
regular $1 admission charge When 
considering that the United Artists 
theaters at the Loyal Plaza 



Wiiiiamsnort and the Lycoming Mall in 
fvluncy RD have a "dollar night" every 
Tuesday and a College ID isn't needed, 
the SGA-sponsored movies are not 
what one would call "getting their 
money's worth." 

f^-A'-i^Tir 
There are a few students who 
have attempted to utilize the SGA, but 
when they went to the SGA office they 
found it was not open and that office 
hours were not posted. That - in a 
sense - Is a loss of a student's activity 
fee. 

The SGA seems not to have 
represented the students thus far. 
Perhaps SGA "representation" during 
the spring semester will feature more 
than just a (vionday night movie, and 
perhaps the SGA will be a bit more 
organized lo let the student body know 
it exists. 



Cartoons, letters to the editor, and other 
connnnentary-type material for publication may be 
submitted to the editorial page editor of the 
SPOTLIGHT, in Room 7 of the Academic Center, by 
noon Tuesday before the next date of publication. 



SPOTLIGHT 
Monday, December 3, I9B4 - Vol. 20, No. 16 

Trie SPOTLIGHT is published eacti Monday morning of the academic year, ex- 
cept for College vacations, by journalism and other interested students of The 
Williamsport Area Community College 

Office: Room 7. Academic Center. 1005 W, Third St.. Wllliamsporl, Pa 
17701. Telephone: (717) 326-3761. Extension 221, 



Opin 



THE STAFF 
Donna M. Barnett, Managing Editor. Karen M Metarl<o. Edilofial Page Editor: 
Gisela D Grassley. Photography Editor. Mark s Schwanite. Administrative Attairs 
Editor: James K Morrissey. Student Affairs Editor. Kathryn M Gilbert. Advertising 
Manager: Rodney D Hill. Sporls Editor. Richard E, Kopp Jr . Senior Staff Writer 

REPORTERS/STAFF ASSOCIATES 

Wanna F. Brown. Melanie S Callahan. Kathleen L Eiserl, Anne T, Moratelii. 
Sandra L Musgrave. Sandra R Taylor. Jennifers White. LeRoy S. Whitmire Jr.. 



Production Staff Thia Issue 

Rodney D. Hill, production superviser; Richard E. Kopp Jr. and Karen M. 
Metarko. videocomposllion; Donna M. Barnetl, copy editor; Wanna F. Brown, 
Kathleen L. Eiswert and LeRoy S. Whtlmire Jr., production assistants. Mrs.' 
Louise H. Sweeney, acting advlsi 




The Sidelines 



Sports Commeiitiry 

By Rodne; D. HUl 

SPOTLIGHT Sports Editor 



'••Vi/^'AWW/WWAtd M I HMUII t ■il«AIWM.I««M<NW/<l 



SPOTLIGHTDMondiy, Decembtr 3, 19«4n3 

Dew Crew moves into tie for lead 




With the 1984 college football 
season coming to a close, an unexpected 
national champion may be crowned. 

The Brigham Young Cougars have 
finally made the number one spot in 
both the Associated Press and the 
United Press International Coaches 
Polls. BYU has the nation's longest 
winning streak, where they have reached 
23 consecutive games. With one game 
remaining on their regular season 
schedule, they have already earned the 
right to host the Western Athletic Con- 
ference's bowl which is the Holiday 
Bowl on December 21. 

This year will make BYU's seventh 
consecutive trip to the Holiday Bowl 
and they will play a disappointing 
Michigan team that has only six wins 
compared to five losses. 

BYU does not play the competition 
that other teams in the top 20 play. 
They would not be a good choice for the 
national champions. The Cougars go 
through a whole season playing weak 
teams and to top it off, they are going to 
play a team that is six and five. 

The schedule that BYU plays and 
the match-up in the Holiday Bowl make 
the championship a giveaway. To be a 
true championship, a game with any 
team in the top ten would be a bit more 
convincing. 

Personally, I think the only bowl 
match-up that is going to be worth 
anything is the Orange Bowl, where the" 



Oklahoma Sooners and the Washington 
Huskies will play each other. Both 
teams are in the top five and they didn't 
play teams that were below their class 
either. 

Another team that would be a wor- 
thy contender for the national cham- 
pions is Boston College. BC has a 
record of eight and two with only one 
game left. Their two losses came at the 
hands of West Virginia and Penn State, 
teams that BC could easily avenge their 
losses against. 

Penn State was off to a good start 
earlier in the season, where they were 
four and nothing, but in their last seven 
games they were two and five. 1 think 
the only thing Penn State did well was 
turn down a bowl bid. 

Pitt was ranked fairly high at the 
start of the season but finished the 
season with only three wins. One of 
those wins was against cross state rival 
Penn State and it was a convincing win 
at that, 31-11. 

The college football season started 
with a lot of interesting games, with no 
teams really dominating. There were 
many teams that did reach the first posi- 
tion. It's not going to end like il started, 
because of the bowl match-ups. 

There should be a bowl reserved 
for the top two teams. That way a team 
can't take an easy ride to the national 
championship. 




The first place position is being 
shared by two teams once again. 
W.A.C.C. Five-O has been on top 
throughout the semester and at different 
times it looked as though they were go- 
ing to run away with a larger lead. This 
is the first time (hat the Dew Crew has 
reached first place. 

For the most part, the rest of the 
teams are gathered around .500, 
Team Standings 

The team standings, with the first 
number representing the wins and the 
second number representing losses. 

1. W.A.C.C. Five-O and Dew 
Crew, 19,11. 

3. We Three, Scratch and Pin 
Busters, 16, 14. 

6. Lucky Strikes, 15, 15. 

7. The Outlaws, 14, 16. 

8. Defenders of the Faith, 4, 26. 

High Team Series 
1. The Outlaws, 1802; 2. Scratch, 

'Hoop Shoot' Saturday; 
participants still needed 

The Intramural Athletics and Col- 
lege Activities Office and the 
B.P.O.E. (Benevolent and Protective 
Order of Elks) Lodge 173 are co- 
sponsoring the "1984 Hoop Shoot," a 
basketball free-throw competition for 
youth, ages eight to 13. 

According to Mrs. Jo Ann R. 
Fremiotti, coordinator of intramural 
athletics and College activities, the con- 
test will take place from 1 to 4 p.m., 
this Saturday, Dec. 8, in the Bardo 
Gymnasium. 

"Any College staff, faculty, or 
students with children who would like to 
compete can register on-site at no 
charge. For further information about 
the event, call College, ext. 412," said 
the coordinator. 

Included in a list of unusual job oc- 
cupations is a boner-one who inserts 
stays (such as bones or steel) into 
prepared pockets of women's founda- 
tion garments, such as corsets or 
brassieres 



1780; 3. We Three, 1746. 
High Team Single 
l.We Three, 645; 2. Scratch, 631; 
3. Pin Busters, 622. 

Men's High Series 
1. Mark E. Reamsnyder, 651; 2. 
Rudy E. Long; 607; 3. Troy A. 
Gaugler, 500. 

Men's High Single 
1. Mark E. Reamsnyder, 233; 2. 
Rudy E. Longs, 210; 3. Troy A. 
Gaugler and Myles S. Murray, 190. 
Women's High Series 
1. Denise M. McNeil, 471; 2. 
Denise M. King, 430. 

Women's High Single 
1. Denise M. McNeil, 184; 2. 
Demse M. King, 147. 

Top "S" Averages 
1. Mark E. Reamsnyder, 193; 2. 
Rudy E. Long, 179; 3. Richard W. 
Jackson, 178; 4. Scott R. Kehs, 177; 5. 
Barry A. Boney, 167. 

Sports Schedule 

Intercollegiate Sports 
Varsity Basketball 

Monday: Baptist Bible (JV), away, 
at 8 p.m. 

Wednesday: Bucks County Com- 
munity College, home, 8 p.m. 

Friday: Philadelphia Community 
College, away, 8 p.m. 

Intramural Sports 

Basketball Tournameol 

Monday, G'town vs. Moondogs, 
Freeze vs. Yuk-A-Roidz, both games at 
7 p.m. 

Tuesday: Payton Gang vs. winner 
of G'town and Moondogs, Panthers vs. 
winner of Freeze and Yuk-A-Roidz, 
both games at 7 p.m. 

Wednesday: Games at 5 and 6 
p.m. 

Thursday: Games at 7 and 8:30 
p.m. 



>nj;;lil 
7:30 p.m. 



ACC Audildhum 



STONEY STEAMER'S 

WORLD FAMOUS HOT DOGS 

Steamed in Beer! 



o 




Dec. 5, 10:00-2:00 Academic Center 

Sponsored by ARTIST UNLIMITED 



4nSPOTUGHTDMondi>, DtwmlKr 1. 19M 

BULLETIN BOARD 

For the Week of Monday, Dec. 3 through Sunday. Dec. 9 

MOVIE 
"Sudden Impact"... 7:30 p.m. Ihis evening, Academic Center Auditorium, SI ad- 
mission with validated College ID, $2 admission for all others. 

SPORTS 
Basketball... 8 p.m. this evening, against Bucks County Community College, home. 
Basketball... 8 p.m. this Friday, Dec. 7, against Philadelphia Community College, 
away. 

MEETINGS 
Circle K... A p.m. tomorrow, Tuesday, Dec. 4, Room B107, Lifelong Education 
Center (LEC). 

Student Government Association Executive Committee... 5 p.m. tomorrow, Tues- 
day, Dec 4, Room BI07, Lifelong Education Center (LEC). 

SALE 
Hoi dog sale... 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. ihis Wednesday, Dec. 5, Academic Center lobby. 
Hot dogs are steamed in beer. Sponsored by Artists Unlimited. 

SPECIAL EVENTS 
Rollerskaling... 8 p.m. to midnight, this Thursday, Dec. 6, at Skating Plus, $2 ad- 
mission or free to faculty, staff, and students with validated College ID; skate ren- 
tals, 75 cents, sponsored by the Student Government Association. 

Found items may be claimed in Security office 

The security office has a number of security. 
found articles: glasses, keys, jackets, "Owners may claim the articles in 

trousers, briefcases, watches, the security office upon proper iden- 

calculators and books, according to (jfjcation, " Smeak said. 
Lawrence P. Smeak, superviser of 



niEE CLASSIFIEDS 

for students, faculty 

and College employees. 

Drop the classified off 

in Room 7 (The SPOTLIGHT), 

or call Ext. 221, 

This space could be yours! 



Permanenl fuU-lime: Hope Enter- 
prises, Inc , 136 Catawissa 
Ave., Williamsport, PA 
17703-1857 is accepting ap- 
plications for a Maintenance 
Supervisor in their Residential 
Services Program. For more in- 
formation call 326-7413 or stop 
and fill out an application 




Part-lime Student Employmenl: Cillo's 
College Corner would like someone to 
wait on customers Mon-Thurs., 3-6 
p.m. and Fri. 3-5 p.m. Stop by and talk 
with Mr. Cillo during their off-hours. 

Anyone interested in sharing a ten room 
house in the Brandon Park area of Hep- 
burn Street, Williamsport, should con- 
tact either Andy, or Mike, at 323-1006 
in the evenings. We have immediate 
openings for two persons who are will- 
ing to exchange a little personal respon- 
sibility for a clean, spacious, comfor- 
table place to live. 



Christmas 

Wreath 

Sale 



$5 undecomted 
$7 decorated 

Call Kathryn A. Landls at the 
Natural Resources Manage- 
ment Campus; (717) 547-1661 
or College Ext. 8-0 

.sponsored by the Horticulture Techni- 
cians Club 




<s> 



Buy One pizza 
Get One FREE! 






CILLO'S COLLEGE CORNER 

We'll prepare your favorite Subs and Burgers the way 
you like them! 

Play LUCKY NUMBERS and win a half sub plus a medium 
drink. Four winners every week! 

Cillo's College Corner 
1 100 W. Third St.W^illiamsport 

(Next to Academic Center! Phone Ahead; 322-1321 
Hours 7:30 a.m. to 6:00 p m l\^onday through Thursday 
Friday 7:30 am to 5:30 p,m 




Chicicen au Champagne 
special for tomorrow 
in Le Juene Chef 

The following are the week's menus 

for Le Juene Chef restaurant in the 

Lifelong Education Center: 

Tuesday, Dec. 4 

Special 

Chicken au Champagne 

Mediterranean rice 

Green beans or glazed carrots 

Apple spiced bread; Beverage 

a la carte 

Cream of onion and cheese soup 

Dessert 

Pumpkin custard pie 

Eggnog pie 

Ambrosia 

Thursday, Dec. 6 

Chicken Balottine with Grand Poupon 

Glazed sweet potatoes 

Buttered broccoli or scalloped corn 

Cranberry nut bread; Beverage 

a la carte 

Zucchini soup 

Caesar salad 

Desserl 

Dessert Cup with strawberry ice cream 

Carrot cake 

Pecan pie 

Friday, Dec. 7 

Turkey Florentine 

Herbal browned potatoes or beets with 

orange sauce 

Bread and rolls 

a la carle 

Manhattan Deli Salad 

Beef noodle soup 

Dessert 

Strawberry surprise cake 

Cream cheese mousse 

Coconut pie 

Cars left in College lots 
during plowing 
are subject to fine 

All cars left in College parking lots 
at the time of snow plowing will be con- 
sidered obstructing and those owners 
will be subject to a $10 fine, according 
to Lawrence P. Smeak, superviser of 
security. 



Computer Fair 
this Thursday 

A Computer Fair will be held this 
Thursday, Dec. 6, in Room 210, 
Lifelong Education Center (LEC) from 
10 a.m. to 4 p.m., according to Dr. 
James E. Middleton, dean of academic 
affairs. 

Faculty, staff and students will be 
able to purchase microcomputers at a 
discount rate through purchase pro- 
grams available through IBM and the 
Ben Franklin Partnership. 

Vendors will be on hand to 
demonstrate the equipment, answer 
questions and share prices. 

"I believe IBM equipment is of- 
fered at a 30 percent discount and Apple 
at a 40 percent discount," Dr. Mid- 
dleton said. 

Dr. Middleton also noted that any 
purchases will be on a cash basis, 
although he feels that other ar- 
rangements may be made between the 
purchaser and the vendor. 

According to Dr. Middleton, the 
Computer Fair is part of the College's 
overall commitment to develop com- 
puter applications in instructional pro- 
grams and administrative areas. 

"The Ben Franklin Partnership is 
part of the state's economic revitaliza- 
tion program to strengthen computer 
skills throughout the Commonwealth," 
Dr. Middleton said. "This computer 
fair and others to follow will build on 
this effort." 

STICKING WITH IT 

Among unusually-named jobs is a 
sucker-machine operator. That's the 
one who tends the machine that 
automatically forms lollypops of 
specified shape on ends of wooden 
sticks. 



Unpaid tickets result in hold 
on grades and transciipts 

All tickets not settled by Dec. 
12 will result in a hold on grades 
and/or transcripts, according to 
Lawrence P. Smeak, superviser of 
security. 



BENSON 



Ofll mini, ^ 
J^Mn market 



Comer of 3icl and Maynard Sts. 



Always Open: 
All Night 
Sundays 
and Holidays 




•^1 



E^hl new ethics courses 

see Page 4 

Spotlight on dental hygienists 



Happy Holidays! 

Spotlight 



Mondir, Dtcember 10, 1984 • Vol. 20, No.Jf' • 8 F>tH ' 
WUIiimsport Am Communil; Collect • WUUimsport, Pi. 17701 




Semester's final sports schedule 



Focus: Word processing 



Districts, commissioners oppose 




College sponsor woes continue 



ABOUT 200 STUDENTS attended the Compoter Fair last Thursday, Dec. 6, in 
Room 210, Lifelong Education Center (LEC). According to Sharon A. Castle, 
Regional Education Manager for Leigh Data Systems Inc., "The Computer Fair 
was a success and there seemed to be a good student turnout." The manager is 
pictured explaining the IBM X-T computer to Robert S. Gehrig, a computer 
science student from Williamsport. (SPOTLIGHT photo by Gisela D. Grassley.) 

College pilot program expands 



By Mark S. Schwanke, SPOTLIGHT 
Administrative Affairs Editor 

As the difficulty surrounding the 
sponsorship of the College continues, 18 
of the 20 sponsoring school districts cur- 
rently involved have made their inten- 
tions known concerning their future as 
local sponsors. 

Of the 18 responding, only the East 
Lycoming School District has relayed an 
interest in renegotiating the present 
sponsorship framework, according to 
Dr. Robert L. Breuder, College presi- 
dent. 

With this in mind. Dr. Breuder 
slated, "We «uuld like ihc school 
districts out of the picture, in the final 
analysis, because of the relationship bet- 
ween the secondary and 
post-secondary... it just doesn't seem to 
mesh philosophically." 



Last week the Lycoming County 
Commissioners again voiced indications 
that they would take no positive action 
concerning the county sponsoring the 
College. The Williamsport Area School 
District presented a document to the 
commissioners encouraging them to 
reconsider their position, precipitating 
the commissioners reaction. 

In a decision made last Monday, 
the College's Board of Trustees directed 
the Executive Committee of the Board 
to develop a position slalement concern- 
ing sponsorship to be considered by the 
Board within two weeks. 

"We're (llie College; going (o be 
here, we're going to be operating and 
we're going to be providing quality 
education. What the nature of the local 
sponsor will be, I can't tell you at the 
moment," Dr. Breuder noted. 



Courtesy College Information Office 

Following the initial success of 
Weekend College and the request for 
more courses to be made available, the 
College is offering an expanded version 
of the weekend learning concept starting 
with the Spring 1985 semester. The first 
Weekend College class for Spring 1985 
gets underway on Jan. 4. 

i» 



The SPOTLIGHT staff | 
would like to thank the following | 
i people for making the last six | 
I issues a little easier to put out: 
I Mrs. Louise H. Sweeney, acting ] 
« adviser of SPOTLIGHT; Dr. 
I Richard M. Sweeney, professor of j 
X English; Mrs. Veronica M. Muzic, 
9 acting director of Integrated j 
M Studies; Jonathan J. Kolesar, 

9 SPOTLIGHT work-study student, ] 
and the Milton Standard. 
|i The staff is looking forward j 
I to the return of Anthony N. Cillo, 
I SPOTLIGHT adviser, next 
semester. 



The Weekend College concept of- 
fers five scheduling options with these 
options varying according to the course 
being offered and the structured meeting 
times. Option A consists of short ses- 
sions that meet every week for three 
hours on Saturday mornings. 

Option B is a specially designed lab 
session and meets every Friday evening 
,and Saturday throughout the semester. 
I Option C is a concentrated study 
program that enables participants to 
complete the course requirements on 
four consecutive mornings. 

Option D provides programming 
every third weekend for 12 hours of 
combined learning on Friday, Saturday 
and Sunday morning. With this option, 
classes meetonly four weekends. 

Option E permits participants to 
take one or two courses on the same 
weekend. Students could obtain six 
credits by participating in this option. 
Each class meets eight hours on the 
weekend. 

Classes detailed 

Courses being made available dur- 
ing the semester beginning in January 
■■■ Please turn to Page 4 



Proposal to shift salary defeated: 
$19,000 remains 'unclaimed' 

B; Doana M. Bimell, SPOTLIGHT managing editor 

The Student Government Association rejected a proposal by Chester D. 
Schuman, director of admissions and College activities, at their Nov. 13 meeting. 

Schuman proposed that the salary of Mrs. JoAnn R. Fremiotti, coordinator of 
intramural athletics and College activities, be moved from the administrative budget 
to the student activities budget because "she directly serves the students and should 
be paid by them," said Schuman. 

Since the intercollegiate sports program was eliminiated from the 1985-86 stu- 
dent activities budget, approximately $19,000 would be available in the budget for 
Mrs. Fremiotti's salary. 

When he heard of Schuman's proposal, Rodney G. Hurley, interim dean of 
student services, told Schuman to "go ahead and make the proposal" (to the ad- 
ministrators) although he stressed that the idea "would probably not be too well ac- 
cepted". 

"My first reaction to this is that it would look like we were shifting a lot of 
money around. Having just cut the intercollegiate sports program and then moving 
her (Mrs. Fremiotti's) salary around didn't look good," Hurley said. 

After Schuman made his proposal to SGA, the group deUberated the situation 
and presented their recommendation that the proposal not be accepted to Hurley. 

"We have a good SGA, and I'm glad they're getting into this," Hurley said. 
"However, I told them that the decision had already been made prior to their 
meeting that JoAnn's salary would not be put into the student activities budget." 

When asked her feelings on the situation, Mrs. Fremiotti replied, "1 told them 
(SGA) to use their own judgement, look at all the information and come up with a 
recommendation and a good rationale for their decision." 

"Yes, JoAnn told me she wasn't too crazy about the idea herself," Schuman 
said in an earlier interview. 

Hurley noted that an idea to extend the number of days that Mrs. Fremiotti 
will work per year will also be proposed. The proposal is to extend her hours into 
the summer, so she will have time to arrange events and for Fall planning without 
interference from other obligations. If the proposal is accepted, $4,000 vrill be 
taken from the student activities budget to pay the extra salary. 



laSPOTUGHTDMoidi;, DcctoitMC II, 1W4 



Student activities fund: 
Is it wortli your money? 

On-campus Editorial 



Detective Smith suggests 
benefit of pari<ing vagaries 



Now that the curtain will soon be 
dropped on a semester's worth of stu- 
dent activities at the College, do you 
know where your student activity fee 
actually goes? 

First, the Monday night nnovie 
series has a budget of $3,275, which is 
not too bad, considering the features 
shown are nnainly of mediocre quality. 
This program doesn't really seem to be 
worth the money because a student 
can tal<e thai same dollar and attend a 
recently-released movie at the UA 
theaters. 

But. as Chester D. Schuman, 
director of admissions and Col)ege ac- 
tivities noted, a top-rate movie pro- 
gram at the College would take almost 
$10,000 to run. 

The Student Government 
Association receives a $10,850 chunk 
out of the budget, plus another $600 In 
collections. Ivlany students enjoyed the 
Blue Steel concert and the frisbee 
show, but have the SGA sponsored ac- 
tivities so far given the student popula- 
tion their money's worth? 

Currently the outlook Isn't too pro- 
mising, but inside intoimation says that 
SGA has something up Its sleeve to 
"win the hearts of the student body". 

The SPOTLIGHT is budgeted at 
$9,120, which is not that large of a 
sum, considering that the printing costs 



alone gobble up $4000 and 
phototypesetting paper rings in at $40 
per cassette It's expensive to publish 
a free paper 

Other line items in the budget are 
$4000 going towards vandalism, 
$1 3,548 for special events, and $4,560 
for club activities, which is a skimpy 
sum to run a majority of the College's 
clubs on. 

Another expense was the pur- 
chase of a student van for $19,056; a 
sound investment, considering that it 
had cost almost $8,000 per year plus 
maintenance fees to rent a van. 

Other allotments include $14,611 
for the recreation center and $25,000 
for the upkeep of the facilities; ID card. 
$6,339; inlramurals. $16,452, scholar- 
ships, $12,500 and the North Campus 
student activities fund is a measly 
$950. 

A fat budget reserve of $68,798 
rounds out the package. 

Are the students really getting 
their money's worth? It's a matter 
worth thinking about, and students who 
are concerned and who would like to 
include their input concerning the stu- 
dent activity budget can get in touch 
with an SGA representative or see the 
dean of student services for more infor- 
mation. 



Obsessive fan tortures star 



Book Review 

By Kathleen L. Elswert 

"The Fan," written by Bob Ran- 
dall, is an intriguing story about 
Douglas Breen, a mentally ill man who 
has an unrealistic obsession with Ms. 
Sally Ross, a famous Broadway star. 

I^s. Ross doesn't realize the 
obsession and Miss Belle Goldman, 
her secretary, finds it amusing. 
Together, their ignorance allows Breen 
to pave the way for an unsuspecting 
and tragic situation. 

"The Fan's" letters arrive weekly 
In the mall. At first, they appear as 
regular fan mail, with requests of 
autographed photos and the like. 

But the secretary continually 
replies to Breen that Ms, Ross was too 
busy to reply -to his barrage of mall. 
Soon after discovering Miss 
Goldman's identity, Breen attacks her 
on a subway and nearly kills her 

Soon alterwards, Ms. Ross 
stumbles upon some of the continuing 
flow of fan mail, which has become 
quite perverse, including eloquent 
descriptions of how he would spend 
nights with her. 

Breen also starts donning 
women's clothing and follows Ms 
Ross to work and spies on her apart- 
ment - and the star hires police protec- 
tion. 



More letters arrive with Breen 
seething in anger because he can't get 
close to his idol, and a few days later, a 
burned body is found with a note ex- 
plaining that the deceased was "The 
Fan", and that he commiled suicide 
because he decided that he wasn't 
worthy of Ms Ross' love. 

At this point in the book, the ma- 
jority of readers would probably sigh 
with relief, but "The Fan" is far from 
dead. Besides being mentally ill. Breen 
is also very clever. 

But the subtle suspense continues 
with a chilling, excellent conclusion. I 
recommend this book to anyone. 

Show's a miss 



Satire 

[Bailor s Note: The lollowing passage is a satirical piece of fiction submitted to ttie 
SPOTLIGHT tiy a student who writes under the pen name of Joseph T. Spigotz] 

In an informal interview today. Sgt. J. (Michael Smith, detective in charge of 
parking lots at the Community College, suggested that a considerable portion of 
the College's budget could be generated through newly discovered vagaries that 
seem to have been purposely created in the parking policy. 

With just the right interpretation of the parking laws, all persons, to include 
visitors, faculty, and in some cases, non-drivers, could be fined up to $30. just to 
park on the campus. 

Considered as one of the key areas of concentration, was the visitors' park- 
ing spaces. These spaces are ostensibly intended for use by persons who are not 
members of the College. The primary function of the spaces, however, seems to 
be the generation of funding. Anyone who parks in one of these spaces is 
automatically fined $5. This fine is justified, says Det. Smith. 

"It says right here on one of our parking tickets -"Parking in visitor's parking 
space - $5," Smith snickered, "Heh! Heh! It gets'em every time." 

"But what if the parker IS a visitor?" I asked. 

"This is our standard appeal policy, just fill it out and the dean will determine 
your case," stated Det. Smith. 

According to Det. Smith, the real money is in charging students for their use 
of the parking lots. 

"Failure to register your car with me is the best one," says the smiling detec- 
tive "I'll get'em for twenty-five bucks for that, and if the unregistered vehicle hap- 
pens to be in the visitor's spot I'll get thirty, " 

When asked about the appeal process. Smith said. "Oh, that, well, it (the pro- 
cess) is there but remember, the appeal form is near impossible to fill out correct- 
ly, and besides. It gets turned in to me first. Anyway, it hasn't been much of a pro- 
blem in the past." 

In response to a question about ticketing non-drivers, Smith says, "This is a 
good one here. Every semester I go through our vehicle files, and anyone who 
hasn't re-registered their vehicle for the new term gets a ticket ($25) in the mail." 

"What if the person no longer owns the vehicle, or doesn't go to school here 
anymore?" I asked. 

"This is our standard appeal policy, just fill out the enclosed card and the 
dean will determine your case," said Smith, "One time I nailed a visiting dignitary 
from some college up in Canada with 'failure to register' and he paid his fine and 
registered his rental car. Now I get him every term for 'failure to re-register.' He'll 
pay too. They all pay." 

With all of the worries about the loss of sponsorship funds. Detective Smith 
and his ticket book may well turn out to be the pot of gold that the College has 
been searching for. 

"Our standing policy is fine first, ask questions later." the ever-alert detective 
concluded. 



SPOTLIGHT 
Monday. DecemberlO. 1984 ■ VoL 20, No. 17 

The SPOTLIGHT IS published each Monday morning of the academic year, ex- 
cept lor College vacations, by journalism and other interested students of The 
Williamspon Area Community College. 

Office Room 7. Academic Center, 1005 W Third St., Williamsport, Pa. 
17701 Telephone (717) 326-3761, Extension 221. 



TV Review 

'bv LeRoy S. Whitmire Jr. 

As a situation comedy, Mr. Mom 
lacks drama and realism-and comedy. 
Alttiough the show provides a lew 
laughs, I cannot see any progress for 
this series as a situation comedy. 

The show aired at 9 p.m. Nov. 30, 
on ABC-TV The producers should 
have thought this one out a little longer. 

The producer should have lollow- 
ed the pattern of the movie Mr Mom. 
which was a combination of comedy- 
drama that incorporated a more 
realistic approach. Then the show may 
have been worthwhile to watch. 



THE STAFF 
Donna M, Barnelt, Manag/ng Editor; Karen M Metarko, Editorial Page Editor, 
GIsela D Grassley, Pitotograpriy Editor. Marl< S Schwanke. Administrative Allairs 
Editor: James K Mornssey, Studertt Aflairs Editor. Kathryn M. Gilbert, Advertising 
Manager. Rodney Hill, Sporls Editor; Richard E Kopp Jr , Senior Stall Writer. 

REPORTERS/STAFF ASSOCIATES 

Wanna F Brown, Melanie S Callahan, Kathleen L Elswert, Anne T. Moratelll, 
Sandra L Musgrave, Sandra R Taylor, Jennifer S White, LeRoy S. Whitmire Jr , 
Canda M Zinci^ 

Faculty adviser Anthony N Cilto 



Production Stall This Itsua 

Kathryn M Gilbert, production supervisor, Karen M Metarko, copy editor; 
Donna M Barnett and Karen M. Metarko, videocomposition, GIsela D. Grassley, 
Richard E Kopp Jr , Anne T Moratelll. and LeRoy S, Whitmire Jr , production 
assistants Mrs. Louise H. Sweeney, acting adviser 



SPOTLIGHTD Monday, Occtmbtr It, In4a3 




SPOTLIGHTD Monday, Occtm 

ID revalidation processing hours; 
schedule given for Spring semester 

According lO information recieved mav rcn-ivi" nn<> at nn <-hari«> 



CANDACE A. WHITE, a food and hospitality student from Mill Hall, 
is one of the College commnnity that helped the Phi Beta Lambda (PBL) 
profit about $30 from its balie sale, which was held in the Academic 
Center foyer last Thursday morning, Dec. 6. The proceeds are tentatively 
planned to be used towards the PBL state conference in the spring, ac- 
cording to club offlcials. Selling the treats is Richard L. Evans Jr., an ac- 
counting student from Philipsburg. (SPOTLIGHT photo by Gisela D. 
Grassley.) 



Drafting students will 
vie in contest Dec. 18 

A drafting contest, for secondary 
students, sponsored by the College's 
drafting faculty promises to be more ex- 
pansive in its second year. The contest is 
^et for Tuesday, Dec. 18, and its pur- 
pose is to evaluate each contestant's 
mastery of excellence and profes- 
sionalism in the field of mechanical 
drafting, according to Dr. William J. 
Martin, director, secondary vocational 
education. 

Students in grade 9 through 12 
from all sponsoring schools are eligible 
to compete. The College faculty will act 
as judges. Three awards will be given to 
each grade level. 

The participants will tour the draf- 
ting department and will witness a 
demonstration of the College's new 
Computer Assisted Drafting (CAD) 
laboratory. High school instructors who 
accompany their students will have the 
opportunity to participate in a 
familiarization session in the CAD 
laboratory as a staff development activi- 
ty, Martin said. 

Edward L. Roadarmel, secondary 
drafting instructor, coordinated invita- 
tions, which were mailed to sponsoring 
school districts drafting departments. 
About 75 students participated last 
year, and there is greater interest m the 
1984 event, Roadarmel said. 



Notice: Crossword puzzle 
will return next semester. 



Two S&O awards given 

Courtesy College Information Office 

Raymond P. Shingle, a service and 
operation of heavy construction equip- 
ment student of Chest Springs, was 
recently named Operator of the Year by 
instructors of that curriculum who chose 
Shingle based on his performance in 
operating the various pieces of equip- 
ment. 

Shingle is also a member of the 
Service and Operation of Heavy Con- 
struction Equipment student organiza- 
tion at the College. He was presented 
with a hand level. 

Steven G. Gross, of Montgomery, 
and from the same curriculum, was 
named Mechanic of the Year. His selec- 
tion was based on past performance and 
grade in class and he was presented with 
a torque wrench. Gross is also a 
member of the S&O organization. 

Due to an unannounced 
change in the Monday night movie 
schedule, the SPOTLIGHT er- 
roneously reported that "Sudden 
Impact" was to be shown last \ 

■g Monday, Dec. 3. ; 

■■ Apologies are extended to all ' 
CUnt Eastwood fans and devotees i 
of the College's Monday night * 
movies who showed up to see 

t "Sudden Impact." 

r The Monday night movies, 

t will return next semester at 7 30 
p.m., Monday, Jan. 14 and "Sud- 
den Impact" will be the movie^ 
shown in the Academic Center 
Auditorium. 



According to information recieved 
from the Intramural Athletics and Col- 
lege Activities OfTice, all returning full- 
time and part-time students are required 
to have their student identification cards 
revalidated for the Spring semester. 

Starting Tuesday, Jan 8, current 
students may get their JDs revalidated in 
the Recreation Center Office, Room 
AI37, Lifelong Education Center, dur- 
ing regularly scheduled Recreation 
Center hours. Their is no fee. 
Photo ID hours 

New students and current students 
who have never had a photo ID card 

\Club Briefs.. 

PBL luncheon 
set for Dec. 14 

A luncheon-buffet will be held this 
Friday, Dec. 14, for all members, 
guests, and friends of Phi Beta Lambda 
(PBL), according to Jonathan F. Miller, 
a computer science student a club presi- 
dent from Williamsport. 

PBL is planning to visit several 
nursing homes to entertain the 
residents. "This is a major service effort 
on the part of PBL," said Paul W. 
Goldfeder, assistant professor, business 
administration, and club adviser. 



StutJents 

Interested 

in Joining 

The SPOTLIGHT Staff 

next semester 



may contact the editors 

this week 

in the SPOTLIGHT oflice 

Room 7 

Basement of Academic Center 

or call Ext, 221. 



Last artists' hot dog sale 
nets more club money 

Artists Unlimited sponsored their 
last "steamed in beer" hot dog sale of 
the semester last Wednesday, Dec. 5, 
netting $67.25 for club activities, accor- 
ding to Alma J. Kieffer, advertising art 
student from Mifflinburg and club 
secretary. 

The hot dog sales will return next 
semester, she said. The club wishes to 
thank all patrons. 



may receive one at no charge from the 
Recreation Center Office. Beginning 
Tuesday, Jan. 8, hours for new photo 
ID processing are: 7:30 a.m. to 6 p.m. 
on Fridays, and Noon to 6 p.m. on 
Saturdays and Sundays. Students are 
advised to bring their official schedules 
with them for verification of credits and 
enrollment. 

Special ID processing times for 
Weekend College students will be from 5 
to 7 p.m. Friday, Jan 4 and 8 a.m. to 
noon, Saturday, Jan. 5. 

However, after Monday, Jan. 21, 
there will be a $10 fee to have a photo 
ID processed. After this date, photo IDs 
will only be made on Monday from 10 
a.m. to 1 p.m. and 5 to 7 p.m., or by 
special appointment. 

PBL plans sports 
event with alumni 

Phi Beta Lambda (PBL) will 
host a basketball game with the 
alumni of their chapter at 6:30 . 
p.m. this Thursday, Dec. 13, in 
the Bardo Gym, according to 
David E. Davenport, a business 
management student of South 
Williamsport. 

PBL also extended wishes to •. 
all students and faculty a merry 
Christmas and a happy new year. 

Holiday party at PBL 

Phi Beta Lambda (PBL) will 
hold its lOth annual Christmas 
iparty this Friday, Dec. 14, from 
II a.m. to 2 p.m. in their office 
located in the basement of the 
Academic Center, according to 
David E. Davenport Jr., a 
business management student of 
South Williamsport. 

The party is for PBL 
members, friends, the Advertising 
Art department, and all other 
faculty. 

Sandwiches and drinks will 
be served, Davenport said. 



BENSON 



O ffl mini, ^ 
ntn market 



Corner of 3rd and Maynard Sts. 




Hungry^ 

In a hurry? 

Dim 'I want to wait! 



^ 



Always Open 
All night, Holidays, and Sundays 



4DSPOTLIGHTnMoiid«y. DecemlKr 10. 1984 



I CotUiiiued from Page I 



Weekend ' College program expanded 



and their scheduled meeting dates are as 
follows: Accounting One and Two, 
Saturdays, Jan. 5 through April 20, 15 
meetings, three credits each; Income 
Tax Accounting, concentrated study, 
four weekends, Jan. 4, 5, 6, Jan II, 12, 
1}, Jan. 18, 19, 20, Jan. 25, 26, 27, 
three credits; Solar Heat/Energy Con- 
servation, 15 Saturdays, Jan. 5 through 
April 20, three credits; Basic Automatic 
Tranmissions, 15 Saturdays, Jan. 5 
through April. 20, three credits. 

Basic Automotive Air Condition- 
ing, 15 Saturdays, Jan. 5 through April 
20, three credits; Architectural Draf- 
ting, 15 Saturdays, Jan. 5 through April 
20, three credits; Blueprints and 
Specifications, 15 Saturdays, Jan. 5 
through April 20, three credits; In- 
troduction to Microcomputers,<«oncen- 
tratcd study, four weekends, March 8, 
9, 10, March 15, 16, 17, March 22, 23, 
24, March 29, 30 31, Fridays, Satur- 
days, Sundays, three credits. 

Fundamentals of Computer 
Science, 15 Saturdays, Jan 5 through 
April 20, three credits; COBOL Pro- 
gramming One, dual offering option, 
six weekends, Jan. 4, 5, Jan. 25, 26, 
Feb. 15, 16, March 8, 9, March 29, 30, 
April 19, 20, three credits; English 
Composition One, 15 Saturdays, Jan, 5 
through April 20, three credits; Elec- 
tronics Laboratory One, Fridays and 
Saturdays, 15 weekends, Jan. 4 through 
April 20 three credits. 

Business Communications, four 
weekends every third weekend, Jan. 4, 
5, 6, Jan. 25, 26, 27, Feb. 15, 16, 17, 
March 8, 9, 10, three credits; Business 
Law One, dual offering concept, six 
weekends, Jan. 5, 6, Jan. 26, 27, Feb. 
16, 17, March 9, 10, March 30, 31, 
April 20, 21, three credits; Marketing, 
four weekends every third weekend, Jan. 
4, 5, 6, Jan. 25, 26, 27, Feb. 15, 16, 17, 
March 8, 9, 10, three credits; General 
Psychology, a dual offering, six 
weekends, Jan. 5, 6, Jan. 26, 27, Feb. 
16, 17, March 9, 10, March 30, 31, 
April 20, 21, three credits. 

Light Duty Diesel Engine Com- 
ponents, 15 Saturdays, Jan. 5 through 
April 20, three credits; Light Duty 
Diesel Engine Diagnosis and Service, 15 
Saturdays, Jan. 5 through April 20, 
three credits; Light Duty Diesel Fuel 
Systems, 15 Saturdays, Jan. 5 through 
April 20, three credits; Word Processing 
One, concentrated study, four 
weekends, Friday, Saturday, Sunday, 
Jan. 4, 5, 6, Jan. 11, 12, 13, Jan. 18, 
19, 20, Jan. 25, 26, 27, three credits. 

Word Processing Two, concen- 
trated study, four weekends, Friday, 
Saturday, Sunday, Feb. 8, 9, 10, Feb. 
15, 16, 17, 18, Feb. 22, 23, 24, March 
1. 2. 3, three credits. 

Weekend College scheduling 

Students who are degree candidates 
can call their adviser if they are in- 
terested in pursuing a weekend course. 
Their adviser will complete a schedule 
and send it to the Student Records Of- 
fice. An invoice will then be generated 
from the Bursar and mailed to the stu- 



dent. Students must complete all finan- 
cial requirements one week prior to the 
start of class. 

Anyone taking a class for the first 
lime will have to complete an applica- 
tion for admission in the Admissions 
Office. Once that is done scheduling 
can be completed. Scheduling for classes 
can be completed at the Student 
Records Office window. Payment must 
be made one week prior to the start of 
class. 

Those who were enrolled in a 
course as an unclassified student during 
the previous semester need not make an 
application to the College but may take 
the desired course selection to the Stu- 
dent Records window for processing. 

For more information on Weekend 
College classes and registration, contact 
Dr. Donald Bergerslock, director, or 
Thomas Leitzel, assistant director, 
business and computer technologies 
division, Ext. 225. 
Survey reveals iludent satisfacliod 

Dr. Bergerstock and Leitzel have 
released the results of a survey recently 
completed on the pilot Weekend College 
program. 

A total of 129 surveys were 
distributed and to date 72 students have 
responded. Additional surveys are being 
mailed to two classes. Results show that 
61 percent, or 44, were female and 39 
percent, or 28, were male. Average age 
of respondents was 33.6 years and me- 
dian age was 33 years. When asked to 
rate the quality of instruction on a level 
of one to ten, 53 of the 72 respondents 
gave the program a nine or ten for high 
quality. More than 90 percent of the 
respondents fell the present mode of 
scheduling was satisfactory. 

The survey further revealed that 44 
of the students, or 63 percent, were non- 
degree. The remaining 26 students or 37 
percent were in degree programs. 

In the Fall of 1984 when the 
Weekend College program began, 
courses were only offered through the 
Business and Computer Technologies 
Division. Innumerable requests for 
courses from other academic divisions 
have led to the expanded programming 



being offered in Spring 1985 semester 
Individnil praises noted 
Survey respondents praised both 
the Weekend College format and the in- 
structors. One respondent said, "I think 
the concept is excellent beause it allows 
you to absorb more in a concentrated 
study pattern." 



Eight new ethics courses 
to be offered next semester 

Eight new courses dealing with 
ethics will be offered this Spring, accor- 
ding to information provided by Mrs. 
Veronica M. Muzic, acting director of 
Integrated Studies. 

A course in Effective Report 
Writing will meet Wednesdays beginn- 
ing March 20 through May 8 from 4 to 
6 p.m. 

Theory of Applied Ethics will 
meet Tuesdays and Thursdays from 
Jan. 24 to Feb. 7 from 6:30 to 9:30 
p.m. 

Corporate and Social Respon- 
sibility will also meet Tuesdays and 
Thursdays from 6:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. 
The class will meet Feb. 19 to March 5. 

Life and Death Issues will meet 
Saturdays, Feb. 9 through March 2 
from 9 a.m. to I p.m. 

A course in Moral and Legal 
Issues in Nursing will be offered from 
March 12 through March 26 on 
Tuesdays and Thursdays from 6:30 
p.m. to 9:30 p.m. 

A course in Employee Rights will 
be offered Saturdays from March 9 
through March 30 on Tuesdays and 
Thursdays from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. 

Maintaining the Integrity of the 
Health Care Profession will meet Satur- 
days from April 13 to May 4 from 9 
a.m. to 1 p.m. 

A course on Ethics and Law En- 
forcement Personnel will be offered 
Tuesdays and Thursdays from 6:30 
p.m. to 9:30 p.m. from April 9 through 
April 23. 

Anyone wishing for more informa- 
tion should contact Robert Timko, in- 
structor of history, at Ext. 393. 



Dean of long range planning to leave; 
heading for Florida community college 



Rodney G. Huriey, dean of educa- 
tional research, planning and evaluation 
and interim dean of student services at 
the College has accepted a similar posi- 
tion with Hillsborough Community Col- 
lege in Tampa, Fla. 

Dean Hurley will be in charge of 
institutional planning, research, manag- 
ing information systems and computer 
services, beginning next semester. 

Hillsborough has four campuses 
and a central administration to serve its 
15,000 students. Dean Hurley will work 
in the central administration section. 

Dean Hurley is from the west coast 
of Florida. He attended Florida State 
University, and has family in the area. 



"I think that we accomplished a lot of 
things here in long range planning. All 
of the people who served on our com- 
mittee were outstanding people, and 
they should be complimented for their 
dedication to the institution. ..we had a 
lot of success this year," Dean Hurley 
remarked. 

Dean Huriey was quick to relate 
how impressed he was with the College's 
Student Government Association. He 
felt that they were active, have a sense 
of purpose, and were dedicated to serv- 
ing their fellow students. 



Dental 

Hygiene 

students 

Practical experience, a 
w(ell-known characteristic 
of the College, does not 
pertain only to the technical 
trades but also to the dental 
hygiene students. 

This two year associate 
degree program involves 
community work and apply- 
ing their knowledge in the 
dental hygiene clinic 
located on the fourth floor 
of the Academic Center. 

The clinic offers teeth 
cleaning, x-rays, plaque 
control -personal instruc- 
tion and fluoride treatment. 

The clinic is open to 
College students, faculty, 
as well as the general 
public on Monday and 
Wednesday, 8 a.m. to 1 2 
p.m. and 12:30 to 4:30 
p.m.; Tuesday, 8 a.m. to 
12 p.m.; Thursday, 8 a.m. 
to 12 p.m., 12:30 to 4:30 
p.m. and 5 to 9 p.m. 

There Is always a den- 
tist present along with two 
dental hygiene instructors. 

After the students com- 
plete their training they are 
qualified to work in schools, 
hospitals and private den- 
tists offices. The College 
has a 1 00 percent place- 
ment record with these 
students. 

** 

Dental Hygiene Clinic 
Fee Schedule 

Adult prophylaxis and examina- 
tion (scaling and polishing), $8. 

College employees and students, 

Child prophylaxis and examina- 
tion, $5. 

Edentulous (dentures) examination 
and full denture cleaning, $2. 

Fluoride application, $2. 

X-rays - lull mouth, $10; bitew- 
ings (cavity detection), $4, individual, 
$1, and panelipse, $10. 

Study models, $3. 

Pit and fissure sealants (each 
tooth), $5. 

Emergency examination, $2. 

Emergency treatment (relief of 
pain), $5-$10. 

Nominal charges for preventive 
aids. 



SPOTLlGHTDMondij, December 10, I984d5 



Preventive 

Oral 

Health 

is what we do 




1 A tooth-ache is a good 
excuse to go up and see 
from left to right, Wendy S. 
Fahl, of Howard, and Lynne 
D. Smith, of Harrisburg, as 
they greet you at the recep- 
tion desk. 

2 Preparing to practice 
on each other by washing 
up first are in front Suzanne 
M. Ulmer, of Lancaster; 
Javette O. Thumma, of 
Carlisle, and Donna A. 
Prince, of Middleburg. 

3 Examining an x-ray is 
Carol A. Prater, of 
Williamsport. 

4 Javette L. Trude, of 
Morrisdale, prepared to 
practice plaque control on 
Ann E. Bastian of 
Lewisburg, (seated). 



Text by 
Richard E. Kopp Jr 

Both of 
SPOTLIGHT 



6DSPOTUGHTaMoniliy, Dtnmbcr 10,I9M 



Final week of league bowling 
will determine team champions 



With just three games remaining, 
the fighl for the championship is going 
to be between Dew Crew who is current- 
ly in first place by one game and 
W.A.C.C. Five-0 who is trailing. 

The Dew Crew made quite a com- 
eback since the earlier part of their 
season, when they were in seventh :l 
place. 

The championship will be decided 
tomorrow afternoon at the ABC Bowl- 
ing Lanes. 

Team Standings 

The team standings, with the first 
number representing the wins and the 
second number representing the losses 
are: 

1. Dew Crew, 21, 12; 2. W.A.C.C. 
Five-0, 20, 13; 3. We Three, Scratch 
and Lucky Strikes, 17, 16; 6. Pin 
Busters and The Outlaws, 16, 17, and 8. 
Defenders of the Faith, 7, 26. 
High Team Series 

1. Defenders of the Faith, 1855; 2. 
Dew Crew, 1806; 3. We Three, 1765. 

EOU program offered; 
assessment begin s Dec. 13 

Courtesy College Information Office 

Lawrence W. Emery Jr., director 
of counseling, career development and 
placement, has announced that the Col- 
lege will be offering another Educational 
Opportunities for the Unemployed Pro- 
gram. 

The program gives unemployed 
persons in the College's sponsoring area 
an opportunity to gain training and 
retraining to make themselves 
marketable. 

There will be a group meeting in 
the Academic Center Auditorium at 7 
p.m., Wednesday, Dec. 12, to provide 
further information. 

To be eligible, the unemployed per- 
son must have been unemployed for six 
weeks by Jan. 8, 1985; must have been 
employed for two years prior to becom- 
ing unemployed; must be a resident of a 
sponsoring school district and be able to 
secure a certificate of sponsorship; and, 
must attend the Assessment Phase of 
the program which starts Thursday, 
Dec. 13 and ends Thursday, Dec. 20. 

The College's Educational Oppor- 
tunities for the Unemployed programs 
have enrolled 43 persons since 
December 1983 and 27 are still enrolled 
in training/retraining programs. Accor- 
ding to Emery, these students are doing 
extremely well in their studies. 

Emery further noted that under the 
EOU program there is no charge to the 
unemployed person as their portion of 
the tuition will be waived and 
books/tools will be loaned to the 
students. 

Unemployed persons interested in 
applying for the programs or wanting 
additional information may call 
322-0149 today or tomorrow from noon 
until 4:30 p.m. 



High Team Siogle 

1. Dew Crew, 660; 2. Defenders of 
the Faith, 636; 3. We Three, 612. 
Men's High Series 
1. Richard W. Jackson, 232; 2. 
Barry A. Boney, 223; 3. Rudy E. Long 
and Mark E. Reamsnyder, 197. 
Women's High Series 
Denise M. King, 412; 2. Denise M. 
McNeil, 384. 

Women's High Single 
I. Denise M. King, 158; 2. Denise 
M. McNeil, 146. 

Top "5" Averages 
1. Mark E. Reamsnyder. 195; 2. 
Rudy E. Long, 181; 3. Richard W. 
Jackson, 173; 4. Scott R. Kehs, 172; 5. 
Barry A. Boney, 167. 



Sports Schedule 

Intercollegiate Sports 
Men's Basketball 
Monday: Lock Haven (JV), away, 
7 p.m. 

Wednesday: Luzerne County Com- 
munity College, home, 8 p.m. 

Saturday: Delaware County Com- 
munity College, home, 3:30 p.m. 
Intramural Sports 
Monday: Double Elimination 
Basketball Tournament, 7 p.m. 

Tuesday: Double Elimination 
Basketball Tournament, 7 p.m. 

As he was being strapped into the 
electric chair, George Appel quipped, 
"Well, folks, you'll soon see a baked 
appel." 



Work-Study timesheets 
for week of Dec. 10-14 
due Dec. 14 

All work-study students are 
reminded to turn in a time sheet for this 
week, in order to receive payment for 
the final week of work-study this 
semester, according to information pro- 
vided by Mrs. Edna F. Reiff, financial 
aid assistant. 

The time sheets should be turned in 
by Friday, Dec. 14, according to the in- 
formation. 

Paychecks will be mailed from the 
College on Dec. 21 unless students make 
arrangements with the Financial Aid Of- 
fice to pick them up there, according to 
the information. 

No man can reveal but that which 
already lies half asleep in the dawning 
of another man's knowledge 



Dottt/ust 

get a job with 

your special skills. 




Get an 
advantage! 



A specific job guarantee, 
accelerated promotions and 
a possible bonus are jusi 
the start. With ournew 
College Enlistment Program. 
>'our high school diploma 
and special skills training 
pay off from the beginning, proof that your special skill means 
something to the Corps. 

For example, your specialized training could guarantee you 
a job such as meial worker, electrician or construction surveyor 
jusi to name a few of the 260 select jobs >ou could qualify for 

Also, by getting accelerated promotions, you'll be m^ng 
more money from the day you onlsh recruit training Your fii^i 



rank will be private first class, 
Within 6 months you'll be pro- 
moted to lance corporal, tf you 
qualify, you could make corpo- 
ral within 15 months. Higher 
rank, higher pay. 

Another advantage of our 
College Enlistment Program is the chance to get a bonus. Whether 
you qualify for one depends on the MOS you choose. 

The advant^es add up quickly in our College Enlistment 
Program. And if you qualify, you'll have an advantage for life 
few others can claim — the self-confidence and respect that 
come with earning the title United States Marine. 



The Marines an hokiagAr a kw good men. 

For More Information Call: GySgt Schuette at 717-782-7296 



Program lauded as successful 



By Winna F. Brown 

OF the SPOTLIGHT staff 

The word processing program is a 
fairly new program at the College, 
which had its first processing unit in 
1970, and will have its first graduating 
class in the curriculum in May I98S. 

The College sent out surveys to 
two-year colleges throughout the coun- 
try for information for its course 
syllabus and to improve its program. 

Forty percent of the surveys were 
returned, and they indicated that the 
College is considered to have the best 
equipment for a word processing pro- 
gram. 

A good reason for this is the Col- 
lege's latest addition, the 5520 Shared 
Logic Administrative system, which has 
eight terminals, according to Alex W. 
Bailey, professor of business ad- 
ministration. 

The equipment in the new word 
processing center is basically an IBM 
shop, Bailey noted. The center has, in 
addition to the 5520 SLAS, ten display 
writers. 

The program itself consists of 62 
credits, with core courses in Word Pro- 
cessing I, II, and III, Machine 
Transcription and Office Procedures 
and a typing course. There is also a 
word processing internship which is like 
.the College's CO-OP and a CO-OP can 
be substituted for the word processing 



internship, Bailey said. 

Instructors like Bailey teach 
weekend college and night courses in ad- 
dition to daily classes. The students are 
allowed to work on their own two days 
per week if they need to, to catch up on 
their programs. 

The program began with 29 
students and has shown a tremendous 
increase of 80 percent in the upcoming 
class, according to Chester D. 
Schuman, director of admissions and 
College activities. 

"The word processing program will 
continue to increase in popularity," 
Schuman estimated. 



SGA representatives 
interview applicants 

Six Student Government Associa- 
tion representatives served on a commit- 
tee last week to interview two appUcants 
for the position of dean of student ser- 




MARY L. CASTLE, a word processing 
student from Canton and Fern Flnkels- 
tein, a word processing student from 
Williamsport, working on the IBM 
DIsplaywriters in the new Word Pro- 
cessing Center. (SPOTLIGHT photo 
by Gisela D. Grassley) 



Revisions an all-around improvement 
for secondary auto-body curriculum 



{Editor's Note: This is the fourth in a 
series of articles describing the secon- 
dary vocational education program of- 
fered at the College. I 

The secondary vocational auto 
body curriculum has been revised on 
competency-based program. 

The program was created by Dr. 
William J. Martin, director of secon- 
dary vocational programs, John J. 
Macko Jr., instructor; Leonard R. 
Filipkowski, assistant professor of auto 
body, and Wayne A. Smith, a former 
auto body instructor. 

The revision of the program offers 
incentives, awards, and advance place- 
ment and was revised to give students a 
better feel for the curriculum. As 
juniors, students work on panels, hoods 
and fenders - donated or purchased for 
their use. Students must master metal 
straighting, body panel fabrication, 
plastic filler application, glass and trim 
repair, welding, and automotive spray 
painting. 

Skills students obtain in their 
junior years are put to use in their 
senior years, as they begin to work on 
their own cars, or vehicles brought to 
the auto body shop by College student, 
faculty members, churches, and other 
schools. Students are also required to 
do collision repair and painting. 

A co-op program aids incentive to 
achieve their goals. Seniors are hired to 
work in selected auto shops, under the 



direction of William A. Holmes, a 
machine tool technology instructor and 
a co-op coordinator. 

An advanced placement program is 
also offered to seniors in this cur- 
riculum, in which they are given College 
credits toward post-secondary auto 
body curriculum. This could eUminate a 
semester's worth of classes they they 
would normally be required to attend. 

Awards are given to the top three 
seniors from local businesses, such as 
Freezer Auto Parts, Hughesville, Orelli 
Supply Company, in Williamsport, and 
Williamsport Auto Motive Supply Com- 
pany. 

According to a 1982 survey from the 
Chicago Tribune, the six worst U.S. 
presidents were, in order, Warren Har- 
ding, Richard Nixon, James Buchanan, 
Calvin Coolidge, John Tyler and Jimmy 
Carter. 

^^ Buy One pizza 

Get one FREE! I 

I 



' © ES«Sg@^is I?i?a J 



SPOTLIGHTDMondir, DecMnbtr 10, I«Ma7 

Trustee actions noted 

The December Colleee Board of 
Trustees meeting last Monday resulted 
in the following being approved: 

-Verticle Automatic Tool Changer 
and Cinlum Turning Center for 
machine shop programs, Cincinniti 
Milacron Marketing Company, 
$205,000. 

-CNC Verticle Milling Machine 
Shop programs, Bridgeport Mid- 
Atlantic, $36,170.44 

-Tractor/loader/backhoe, service 
and operation of heavy construction 
equipment program. Medico Industries 
Inc., $35,000. 

-Mobile radio system, service and 
operation of heavy construction equip- 
ment program, General Electric Com- 
pany, $22,023. 

-Computer hardware, software 
and peripheral equipment, for 
Academic Computing network, IBM 
Corp., $284,636. 

-CNC Slant bed lathes, for 
machine shop programs, Allegheny 
Educational Systems, $105,750. 

-Approved amendment of Policy 
V.5.23, Withdrawals and Refunds. The 
amendment is a result of increased stu- 
dent retention initiatives on the part of 
the counseling and career exploration 
department. 

The policy change will reduce 
motivation for early withdrawal (first 
and second weeks) and will give counsel- 
ing an opportunity to work with the stu- 
dent to clarify career goals. The change 
will include a change in refund 
guidelines from first week, 80 percent, 
second week, 70 percent, 60 percent, to 
first day through third week, 70 percent. 

The information was provided by a 
communique from the College presi- 
dent's office. 



Last Monday, Dec. 3, the represen- 
tatives met with Dr. Evelyn Mayer, who 
is presently director of student develop- 
ment at Delhi (SUNY) College in Delhi, 
N.Y. Dr. Mayer has a doctorate of 
education from the University of West 
Virginia, a master's degree from the 
former Shippensburg State College in 
guidance and counseling and 'a 
bachelor's degree in education from the 
former Lock Haven State College. 

Last Thursday, Dec. 6, the com- 
mittee interviewed Dr. Adelaide (Van) 
Titus, who's present position is assistant 
dean of student services at the Temple 
University of Pharmacy. Dr. Titus has a 
doctorate degree from Temple Universi- 
ty in higher education administration, a 
master's from Trenton State University 
in counseling, and a bachelor's from the 
same school in health, physical educa- 
tion, recreation and English. 

The student representatives review- 
ed each applicant's summary resume, 
discussed problems and presented ideas 
with the applicants. 

The position of dean of student ser- 
vices was vacated by Dr. Charles J. 
Cunning in early September. Dr. 
Rodney G. Hurley, dean of education 
research, planning, and evaluation, has 
been serving in an interim capacity since 
that time. 

The SGA representatives serving on 
the interviewing committee are Steven 
D. Metzker, a business management 
student from Williamsport and SGA 

president; Edward C. Keyworth III, a 

retail management student from Or- 'CollegC FatC' Offered by 
wigsburg and SGA treasurer; Donna M 



Barnett, a journalism student from Mif- 
flintown and SGA secretary; Samuel A. 
Mundis, a diesel mechanics student 
from York and SGA vice-president; 
Jody K. Horn, a general studies student 
from Mountoursville and Michael S. 
Ellis, a general studies student from 
Montoursville. 



Library hours listed 
over holidays 

With the Christmas holiday ap- 
proaching, the College library hours will 
be shortened, according to Mrs. Kate 
D. Hickey, librarian, as follows: 

December 17 through 21: 8 a.m. 
-4:30 p.m. 

December 22 through January I: 
Closed 

January 2 through January 4: 8 
a.m. -4:30 p.m. 

January 6: 2 p.m. - 9 p.m. 

Regular hours will resume Mon- 
day, January 7. 



Piedmont Flight Lines 

Piedmont Airlines has recently 
placed into effect a 50 percent discount 
fare for full-lime students attending an 
institution of higher learning, according 
to information provided by Preston H. 
Blum, city sales manager for Piedmont 
Flight Lines. 

The reduced fare is designed lo 
allow students who may be (lying home 
for ihe holidays or on vacation a means 
of savings, according to the informa- 
tion. 

Known as the "College Fare," this 
special pricing will be valid for travel 
anywhere on the Piedmont system 
llhrough Feb. 28, 1985. Sludenls must 
be full-time and must have a current 
school I.D. card, according to the infor- 
mation. 

Students interested in more infor- 
mation about "College Fare" and its 
restrictions can call Piedmont Airlines 
directly at 1-800-251-5720 or contact a 
local travel agent for details. 



Among the list of Kermil Schafer's 

Listed as one of the 10 famous favorite bloopers is a presentation by 

draft dodgers is Muhammed Ali, who Harry Von Zell..." Ladies and 

claimed himself a conscientious-objector gentlemen, the president of the United 

in the Vietnam War. Stales, Hoobert Heever." 



SoSPOTLIGHTDMoiidiy, December "■ '«" 

n A^SIFIFD An<J ATTENTION DECEMBER AND MAV 

K.L,t\ooir icu /\u:3 graduates save the transcript 



!.„. I pfc„''fc ,,, „, ... J RECEIVE AT THE END OF FALL 

Episcop>l Chprch, 844 W. 4>h Si. SEMESTER AND MAKE XEROX COPIES, 

would like someone lo work in Ibe jHIS CAN BE USED FOR ONOAMPUS 

nnrstry daring lale chorch jervices 10 INTERVIEWS AND ANY TIME WHEN AN 

i.m. lo noon every Sunday, caring for OFFICIAL TRANSCRIPT IS NOT RE- 

infants Ihrough second grade children. 0UIRED^^_^^^^^^^^^^^_ 

If inleresled, call Penny Slockell al FOR SALE: KAVPRO II 



323-3751. 



NEED AN EXTRA ELECTIVE? 

Would you like to be better informed on (he 
political influences on Health Care. Education 
and other Social issues? Then register for the 
Health Care Systems course (FHD 234-01) 
which will meet at 12 noon on Mondays, 
Wednesdays, and Fridays in Room 122 of the 
LEC. This course will be held in the Spring 1985 
semester. Every Friday you'll have the oppor- 
tunity to hear 14 different Directors of Health 
related programs explain the pros and cons of 
being a Government agency. 



MICROCOMPUTER SYSTEM 
COMPLETE SYSTEM ONLY $1400 

Kaypro 1 1 Portable Computer with 64K 
memory, Full Keyboard, 9 inch 
Monitor, Dual 190 Disk Drives, and 
Gemini 10 Printer with Cable. Software 
Master Diskettes Included. Contact Jack 
Murphy at 435-0727 (evenings) or leave 
a note on the Bulletin Board in LEC 
A209. 



BULLETIN 
I BOARD I 

For the week of Monday, Dec. 10 
Ihrough Friday, Dec. 14. 

SPORTS 

Basketball...! p.m. this evening, 
against Lock Haven University (JV), 
away. 

Basketball... i p.m. this Wednes 



Le Jeune Chef open 
for College faculty 
over X-mas vacation 

To accomodate the College faculty, 
Le Jeune Chef restaurant will be open 
for lunch from 1 1 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. on 
Dec. 18, 19, 21, according to Mrs. Sue 
Bennett, coordinator of food services. 

The restaurant will also be open the 
same hours on Jan. 3 and 4. Mrs. Ben- 
nett noted that even though College 



day, Dec. 12, against Luzerne County students will be on vacation, the post- 
Community College, home. secondary students and CoUege faculty 
SPECIAL NOTICE *•" be returning. 
"Holiday Cheer"... those offices . . Daily specials will be offered in ad- 
and organizations participating in this *'''"' 'o *e a la carte menu. 
Christmas decorating contest should The following are the menus for 
have their decorations completed by 4 lunches this week in the student- 
p.m. this Wednesday, Dec. 12, as judg- operated restaurant. 



ing will take place the next day. 



Business, industry utilize LEC 

Employmenl Second Semester: fof SDeCial COmPUtCr COUFSeS 
lo monilor boy 8 and a giri 14. *^ 



Sludenl 

Slodenl lo monilor boy 8 and a giri 
Hours are from 6 p.m. lo 8:45 a.m. 
Monday through Friday in exchange 
for a room, four blocks from the Col- 
lege. No other duties would be involved 
as (here is also a housekeeper. Ar- 
rangements can be made for an occa- 
sional evening ofL Would prefer so- 
meone wilhoul a weigh! problem. For 
more information, contact Lawrence 
W. Emery, director of counseling, 
career development and place men I . 

Roommale Wanted for Spring 
Semester: Quiet, Non-Smoker, Non- 
Drinker. Close lo the Campus. Call 
Warren Hardman, 1005 West Fourth 
Street, 326-0213 (after 4 p.m.) 
^^^-^— ^-^— ^— ^^— ^« 

TYPING FOR STUDENTS 
Will type reporLs, term papers, elc. 
60 cents per page-double spaced 
90 cents per page-single spaced 
Call: 323-8488 



1 



Courtesy College Information Office 
Room A-209 and A-210 in the 
Lifelong Education Center are being ful- 
ly utilized with personnel from area 
businesses and industries, learning how 
lo use microcomputers, according to 
Grant Martin, coordinator of specializ- 
ed technical education programs. 

He stated that to date, 13 
microcomputer courses have been 
taught in those rooms since the first 
course was held for Avco-Lycoming 
Williamsporl Division of Avco Corp. in 
late September. Approximately 200 
students have participated in these non- 
credit courses which have ranged from 
"An Introduction to the Microcom- 
puter" to "Lotus", he added. 

Currently, II employees of Frito- 
Lay, of Muncy, are enrolled in "In- 
troduction to Lotus," a spread sheet 
processing system to be used with the 
microcomputer. Classes are being held 
from 6 to 8 p.m. on four evenings, con- 
cluding Dec. 12. William T. Ward, in- 
formation center software/device 
specialist, is the instructor. 



Cillo's 

College Corner 

We'll prepare your 
favorite Subs and Burgers 
the way you like them! 




Play LUCKY NUMBERS 

and 

win a hall sub 

plus medium drink 

Four Winners 
Every Week 



Cillo'i tolltitt Corner 
IIOOW. ThiroSl. Wllllimipor 
(Neil to Acidemir Onler) 
AhMd; J22 IJ21 



Mon-Thun. 7:)0j,in. lo 6;(I0 p.ji 
Fri. 7:30 p.m. lo 5:30 p.m. 



Don't miss your last 
chance to catch your 
favorite tunes on your 
favorite radio station 
before we break for 
the semester. 



WWAS 88.1 FM 
everything you always 
wanted in a radio sta- 
tion... and less! 



••^"ft^wwwwwwvwwv^/w v vmiwvwJ^ 



Ten employees of the Pennsylvania 
Department of Transportation (Penn- 
DOT) District 3-0, in Montoursville, are 
also enrolled in "Introduction to 
Lotus." The course is being taught four 
days from 10 a.m. to noon, concluding 
Thursday. R. Dean Foster, director of 
Act lOI/COPing, is the instructor. 

Mrs. Anne Weilminister, itforma- 
tion center support analyst, recently 
taught the "Role of the Microcomputer 
in Word Processing" about 20 members 
of the West Branch Manufacturers' 
Association of Montoursville. The one- 
night course was designed to give 
secretaries, office managers, or anyone 
responsible for an office a hands-on in- 
troduction into the basic impact of the 
microcomputer on modern word pro- 
cessing. 

Members of West Branch 
Manufacturers' Association will also be 
enrolled in "Introduction to Microcom- 
puters" from 7 to 10 p.m. tomorrow. 
Up to 20 members will be enrolled in 
this course, which introduces the 
microcomputer and its basic fiinction. 
Ward also teaches this course. 



Tuesday, Dec. II 

Minestrone Soup 

Deviled Pork Chops 

Twice baked Potatoes 

Peas Paicon or Herbal Vegetable mix 

rolls and beverage 

Desserts 

Norwegian Christmas bread 

Apple Crisp 

cheesecake 

Thursday, Dec. 13 

Split Pea Soup 
Roast Beef Au Jus 
Herbal rice 
honey glazed carrots or Harvard beets 
cranberry bread 
beverage 
Desserts 
Heavenly Lemon Pie 
Pineapple-Tapioca Cream. 
Friday, Dec. 14 
mushroom soup 
Chicken Filled Crepes 
buttered com or Mellow Vegetable duo 
Spiced Applesauce bread, beverage. 
Desserts 
Cookie platter 
Southern Fruit plate 
The 10 most fascinating cities in 
the world, according to a well-traveled 
British journalist, are New York, Lon- 
don, Venice, Cairo. Istanbul, Rio de 
Janeiro, Chicago, Delhi, Paris, and 
Beirut. 



SANTA'S PERKY POINSETTIAS 

For Sale Now In the College Bookstore 
and 
College Greenhouse. 

6 inch pinched plant, $5^' 
5 inch pinched plant, $3. 

DON'T FORGET TO PICK 





UP ONE ON YOUR WAY 
BACK HOME! 



Spotlight 



Mond>>, January 14, 1985 • Vol. 20, ^o. 19 • 4 Pages 
Williamsporl Area Community College • Williamsport, Pa. 17701 

Referral center opens today for students 

abuse or pregnancy. 



Student interest and requests have 
led to the development of the Peer In- 
formation and Referral Center currently 
located in Room 105 of the Gym- 
nasium, according to Mrs. JoAnn R. 
Fremiotti, coordinator of intramural 
athletics and College activities. 

The center has been established to 
assist students with problems such as 
relationships with parents, instructors 
and other students; stress, legal, hous- 
ing and financial problems. The center 
can also help with drug and alcohol 

Recruiting by two firms 
on campus this month 

According to information provided 
by Lawrence W. Emery, director of 
counseling, career development and 
placement, two companies in the state 
will be on campus this month for in- 
terested students. 

For those in the machine tool 
technology and machinist general cur- 
riculums, Berg Electronics, of New 
Cumberland, will be testing in the 
Auditorium at 9 a.m., Thursday, Jan, 
24. Students are to bring a resume and 
transcript to Mrs. Matilda S. Elmer in 
the Placement Office in Room 157, 
Learning Resources Center, by this Fri- 
day, Jan. 18. 

Also, ChemLawn Services Cor- 
poration, of Warminster, will be in the 
library of the Natural Resources 
Management Campus at 8:30 a.m. 
Tuesday, Jan. 29, for forest technology, 
nursery management, agribusiness, 
floriculture and business management 
students. 

Interested students should sign up 
with their instructor or see Mrs. Elmer 
by this Friday. 

Library hours set: 
student ID required 

The library, located in the Learn- 
ing Resources Center, will be open: 

Mon.-Thurs.: 8 a.m. -9 p.m. 

Fri.: 8 a.m.-4:30 p.m. 

Sun.: 2-9 p.m. 

According to Mrs. Kate D. Hickey, 
director of the Learning Resources 
Center, student should be aware of the 
new policy which requires them to use 
their validated College ID card when 
taking material out of the library. 

Fine doubled if not paid 

Students will be fined $10 if their 
vehicle is parked on campus when plows 
clear snow, according to Lawrence P. 
Smeak, supervisor of security. The fine 
will be doubled in 20 days if not paid. 
Fines can be paid in the Security office 
on Park Street, Smeak noted. 



The center is to be staffed by 
students to create a more relaxed en- 
vironment, Mrs. Fremiotti said. 

Thomas A. Zimmerman, instructor 
of human services and social science, 
will advise the group. 

The center is slated to begin opera- 
tion today. It will be open Monday 
through Thursday, 1 to 9 p.m.; Friday, 
1 to 5 p.m., Sunday, 5 to 9 p.m., and 
will be closed Saturday, Mrs. Fremiotti 
said. 

Jan. 21 deadline for ID's 

According to information from 
Mrs. JoAnn R. Fremiotti, coordinator 
of intramural activities and College ac- 
tivities, the ID validation processing 
during the first week of classes was slow 
but the steady stream of students were 
"patient." 

She noted that there were long lines 
and a flood of people near the end of 
the day. However, in order to solve 
those problems, the office is trying to 
add another personal computer. Mrs. 
Fremiotti noted. 

The validation schedule for this 
week is today through Thursday 7:30 
a.m. to 8 p.m., Friday 7:30 a.m. to 6 
p.m. and Saturday and Sunday noon 
to 6 p.m. 

After Monday, Jan. 21, there will 
be a $10 fee to have a photo ID process- 
ed. After this date, photo ID's will only 
be made on Monday from 10 a.m. to 1 
p.m. and 5 to 7 p.m., or by special ap- 
pointment. 

Tutoring Center 
opens today 

The Tutoring Lab, in the Learning 
Resources Center, will be open beginn- 
ing today, according to Mrs. Diana L. 
Kuhns, coordinator of the Tutoring 
Lab. 

The hours are: 

Mon.-Thurs.: 8 a.m. -9 p.m. 
Fri.: 8 a.m. -4 p.m. 

Help with English and math is of- 
fered at all hours. However, the selected 
Technical Trades lab will have to set 
time. Students wishing to seek help in 
those areas may stop in Mrs. Kuhn's of- 
fice to schedule an appointment. 

There is no charge for services. 
Walk-in students are welcome, accor- 
ding to the coordinator. 

Health cards available 

Health cards are now available at 
the front desk in the gym for any stu- 
dent who has not filled out one for the 
College, according to David A. Golfieri, 
evening activities assistant. 




DR. MILES WILLIAMS, dean of employee and commnnity relations, sets 
the ball for Dr. Robert L. Breuder, College president. 

College administration wins 

volleyball tourney: collects 

$57 in donations 

Even though less than 40 people at- 
tended last Wednesday's volleyball 
tournament to aid famine-stricken 

Ethiopia, audience participation was in- \ 

tense as the amateur teams battled for 
the lead while echos of "1 got it!" 
lingered through the gym. 

The Student Government Associa- 
tion, in cooperation with the Lycoming 
County Chapter of the American Red 
Cross, sponsored the event. 

Four teams each played two games 
against each other and in the final com 
petition, the losers and winners were to 
challenge each other. 

In the first round of competition, 
GRIT Pubhshing Co. defeated WWPA 
radio station, 15-10, while the College 
administration beat the SGA, 10-1. 

The end of the second game found 
College administration over the SGA 
15-8 as the GRIT defeated WWPA, 
15-7. 

In the playoffs, SGA downed 
WWPA 15-4 as the administration 
defeated GRIT, 15-7. 





ACCOMPLISHING THE OVER 
HEAD SERVE is Thomas C. LeiUel, 
assistant director of business and com- 
puter science. 



DR. ROBERT L. BREUDER 

displays his winning form as the Col- 
lege administration captured last 
Wednesday evening's volleyball lonma- 
ment (ille to help raise money for 
Ethiopia. 

According to David A. Golfieri 
evening activities assistant, final tabula 
tions concluded that the College ad- 
ministration captured first place, GRIT 
second; SGA, third, and WWPA 
fourth. 

As of press time, the College ad- 
ministration had collected the most 
donations totaling $57, according to 
Mrs JoAnn R. Fremiotti, coordinator 
of intramural athletics and College ac- 
tivities. She added that donations are 
still being accepted for each team. 
"Organizations may also contribute," 
slic noted. 

The donations may be taken to 
Room A137, Recreation Center Office 
in the Lifelong Education Center or 
Mrs Fremiotti's office in the gym. 
Donations may also be taken to the Red 
Cross office, 320 East Third Street. 

Deadline for donations is 4 p.m. 
today. 



iDSPOniGHTDMondiy, JiBPiiy 14. IMS 

Take latest arms talks 'Band Aid' liveS 

with a grain of SALT yp to their name 

SPOTLIGHT commentary ~ 



President Reagan has proclaimed 
the new round of arnns talks between 
Secretary ol Stale George Shullz and 
Soviet Foreign Minister Andrei 
Gromyl<o as the beginning of a new 
dialogue between the superpowers. 

Geneva, Switzerland, the site of 
these talks, was also the location of the 
1972 SALT II negotiations. Those 
discussions dragged on for seven 
years as each side tried to build up 
their stock of weapons before they 
decided to negotiate seriously 
final proposal to limit nuclear weapons 
was signed in June 1979, but the US. 
Senate refused to ratify it, fearing that 
the treaty would give the Soviet Union 
an unfair advantage in certain weapons 
catagories. The Soviet Union's inva- 
sion of Afghanistan in January 1980 
abruptly ended the SALT II lalks. 

The latest round of disarmament 
talks featured a near-walkout by a 
disgruntled Gromyko It would 
therefore be unwise to expect much 
from the Geneva negotiations in the 
way of bringing an effective halt to the 
nuclear arms race Long-lasting 
agreements cannot be made in an at- 
mosphere ol mutual mistrust. 

Harold Robbins' latest 



Music Review by Richard E. Kopp Jr. 

By picking up the record jacket of 
the 45 "Do They Know It's 
Christmas?" by Band Aid, it is plain to 
see this record is not intended tolallv 
for listening enjoyment, it is intended' 
to convey the message that people in 
ttniopia are starving to oeain. 

All the money raised by the sale of 
the record will be used to feed the peo- 
ple of Ethiopia It started when a 
member of the Boomtown Rats saw 
the news clips on television. He decid- 
ed something should be done. Through 
word-of-mouth and invitation, about 40 
of England's top pop talent showed up 
to participate in the making of the 
record and in the video, according to 
Sling, a member of the Police, a very 
interesting chemistry went on. 

The effort put forth by these per- 
formers clearlv shows that the music 
profession is Interested in helping 
the good of mankind. 

Included in a list ol unusual job oc- 
cupations is a boner-one who inserts 
stays (such as bones or steel) inio 
prepared pockets of women's founda- 
tion gaimenis, such as corsets or 
hirissieres 



Nominations begin this week for 
Distinguished Teaching Awards 



A Melting Pot of Sin 

Book Review by Karen M. Metarko 

"We're all whores In our own way (or our own reasons," he said "Power, 
money, sex, ideals. The commodities ol life." 

The self-serving industry-head, Judd Crane, the main character ol Harold 
Robbins' "Descent Itom Xanadu" emphatically revealed his lile-style. 

As head ol Crane Industries, Judd had billions ol dollars in assets, govern- 
ment and employees bowing to his needs, and private planes to travel anywhere 
at anytime. 

Judd had achieved the highest levels ol earthly, material success. 
But that wasn't enough. 

He wanted the one lacel that a human being had never achieved - immortali- 
ty 

To llnd the "lormula" lor immortality, Judd had to wade through elements of 
Soviet agents, double agents, murder, blackmail, adultery, and narcotics, a vir- 
tual "melting pot of sin." 

The Search 
The milieu of this racy piece of literature begins in Yugoslavia. 1976. with 
Judd being interviewed by a renowned genetics scientist, lo discuss the "treat- 
ment" ol everlasting lile. 

Judd's search leads him Irom plane-lrekking Irom the communist-bloc coun- 
try to Florida, Havana, Brasilia, and to the Andes Mountains, where he linds an 
unfinished government nuclear generator and plans to "set up house" there 
-forever. 

During this "testing" time ol lour years, Judd's hypothalamus - a portion ol 
the brain - is taken to 90 degrees body temperature, which would insure him to 
live at least 150 years. But he is not satislied. 

Also during this time, Judd takes a slight detour ol his goal when a woman 

doctor, Solia, enters his lile and tails in love with Judd. and secretly has his child. 

The Discovery 

In the second above-titled portion ol the book, in the sequence happening in 

1 983-84. Judd has moved into the generator, dubbed "Crane Island", to linalize 

plans ol living forever. 

During this lime, the genetic scientist has died and left hall ol her writings 
concerning the immortality "lormula" to Judd and his part-time love interest, 
Sofia. 

Sofia returns to visit Judd at his calling, in order to discover the "lormula". 
The two study the notes, which lead them to the scientist's brother, a guru in 
Calilornia. who has the linal writings to the puzzle. 

"Descent Irom Xanadu" is currently on the Top Ten ol the New York Times 
Bestseller list, and though the paperback version is 407 pages, that drawn-out, 
plodding through leeling is non-existent. 

This novel is recommended lor recreational reading and lor those who are 
open-minded concerning society's morals. 



Nominations for the Distinguished 
Teacher Awards will begin this week, 
with the nomination forms and informa- 
tion being available starting tomorrow, 
according lo Dr. Robert G. Bowers, ex- 
ecutive assistant for internal affairs. 

The Distinguished Teaching 
Awards are designed not only to 
recognize excellent leaching and service 
to students, but also to encourage con- 
tinuation of that excellence. The 
nominees for these awards do not 
necessarily have a long record of 
distinguished service, but their service 
must have been demonstrably outstan- 
ding as measured by the criteria for 
selection of nominees. 

Faculty members who have com- 
pleted one full year of successfiil 
teaching at the College are eligible for 

Backhoe purchased for 
Indian Park Project use 

Benjamin H. Eldred, assistant pro- 
fessor of service and operation of heavy 
equipment, informed the SPOTLIGHT 
that a four-wheel drive model 580-E 
Case backhoe was purchased by the 
College. The new backhoe will be used 
this summer for the expansion of the In- 
dian Park, which is adjacent to Route 
220, at Montoursville. The expansion of 
the park began last May and is schedul- 
ed to be completed in about two years. 

The S&O program is designed to 



nominations. A monetary award of 
$1,000 is given as the "Master Teacher 
Award." One recipient will receive this 
award. Also, a monetary award of 
$500 is given as the "Excellence in 
Teaching Awdrd," and at most two 
recipents will receive this award. These 
awards will be presented at the College 
commencement in May. In 1982, Col- 
lege commencement exercises initiated 
this award. 

Students may Tdl out nomination 
forms after receiving the information. 
Deadline to return nominations is 
March I, stated Dr. Bowers. 

More information is available in 
Dr. Bowers' office, Room 200 of the 
Lifelong Education Center The loca- 
tions to return nomination forms will be 
announced at a later date. 

Phi Beta Lambda 
orientation set 
for January 15 

All business and computer science 
students are eligible to join Phi Beta 
Lambda (PBL), according to Paul W. 
Goldfeder, assistant professor of 
business administration and club ad- 
viser. 

Jonathan F. Miller, computer 
science student from Williamsport and 
club president, will preside at PBL's 



train students to maintain, repair and orientation tomorrow, Jan 15 at 3:30 
operate many types of equipment and to P'"i' '" «'"'"' ^29 of the Academic 
prepare students for jobs in the con- Center. 

"PBL is the largest student 

business organization in the United 

Slates," Goldfeder said, noting that 

about 200,000 students are involved 

Mrs. Janet R. Querimit, of student with the organization nationwide. Ap- 



struction equipment industry. 

Reminder from nurse 



health services, would like to remind all 
students who use student health in- 
surance that they must come to her of- 



proximately 37 colleges and universities 
in the U.S. have a PBL organization. 
The club is preparing to participate 



fice each time they use the insurance, to in the March of Dimes Birth Defects 
out a claim form. campaign, which is slated to begin Jan. 

27. 
NOTICE ^— ^^— — ^^ 



Letters to the editor may be submitted by noon Tuesday in the SPOTLIGHT. 



SPOTLIGHT 
Monday. January 14. 1985 - Vol. 20, No. 19 

Ttie SPOTLIGHT is publistied eacti Monday morning of the academic year, ex- 
cept lor College vacations, by journalism and ottier interested students of Ttie 
Williamsport Area Community College. 

Office Room 7, Academic Center, 1005 W Ttiird St.. Williamsport, Pa. 
1 7701 Telephone. (717) 326-3761 , Extension 221 



THE STAFF 

Karen M Metarko, Managing Edifof. James K Morrissey, Editorial Page Editor. 
Richard E Kopp Jr, Photography Editor, Donna M Barnett, Dartiroom Technician; 
Kathryn M Gi\be(i,Adminis1rative Aflairs Editor Wanna F Brown, Student Affairs 
Editor; Sandra R Taylor, Advertising Manager, Anne T Moratelll, Advertising Assis- 
tant; Kathleen L Elswert. Sporrs Editor, Gisela D Grassipv, Production Supervisor 
Rodney D Hill, Mark S Schwanke. Senior Staff Writers 

REPORTERSISTAFF ASSOCIATES 

Cynthia E A Harlranft. Kelly S Herrold. Sandra L Musgrave. Judith L. 
Swinehart, Jennifer S White, LeRoy S Whitmire Jr 
Faculty adviser Anthony N Cillo 
Acting adviser: Mrs. Louise H Sweeney 



Production SlaH This Isi 
Donna M. Barnett, copy editor. Karen M. Metarko, videocompositio 



«::::xW>i6KSSiW:SSSSSilA'»SWS.<SW::*i!^^ 



Intramural sign-ups 
in Rec Center 

Sign-ups for various intramural 
leagues are being held in Room A137, 
Recreation Center office, in the Lifelong 
Education Center, according to Mrs. 
JoAnn R. Fremiotti, coordinator of in- 
tramural athletics and College activities. 

For the intramural basketball 
league, there will be three leagues of 
competition; men's, women's, and 
coed. Deadline for signing-up is at 4 
p.m. on Jan. 14. 

For students interested in the in- 
tramural volleyball tournament, the 
same catagories will be offered with a 
minimum of 6 players on each team. 
"Individuals may sign up, but should 
note which league they would like to 
register for," Mrs. Fremiotti said. 
Deadline for rosters is at 4 p.m. today. 

Practice time may be scheduled by 
calling ext. 412. 

Students who are interested in an 
upcoming intramural wrestling tourna- 
ment should include weight class and 
curriculum when signing up. More in- 
formation will be given at a later date, 
according to Mrs. Fremiotti. 

Students interested in the in- 
tramural bowling league may sign up to- 
day at ABC Bowling lanes, 1254 Park 
Avenue. 



Open Gym schedule 

Open Gym will take place 
from 6 p.m. to 10 p.m. this even- 
ing, tomorrow evening, and 
Thursday, according to David A. 
Golfieri, evening activities assis- 
tant. 

He added that no open gym 
will be held Wednesday night, due 
to the Hybrid Ice concert/dance. 

During basketball practice, 
the gym will be closed from 4 to 6 
p.m. every evening, he said. 

The weight room will be open 
from 4 to 10 p.m. tonight, tomor- 
row and Thursday, according to 
Goldrieri. 



Downhill ski trips 
to Ski Sawmill 
begin this week 

College activities is sponsoring 
downhill skiing trips to Ski Sawmill in 
Morris, on Wednesday, Jan. 16; 
Wednesday, Jan. 23, and Wednesday, 
Jan. 30, according to Mrs. JoAnn R. 
Fremiotti, coordinator of intramural 
athletics and College activities. . 

More information is available in 
Room AI37, LEC, or by calNng ext 
412. 

College basketball coach 
seeks team improvement 

With a two and six record and 13 
games remaining on the schedule, Col- 
lege head basketball coach Andrew 
Peters is "optimistic" about the rest of 
the season and expects the team to equal 
its wins and losses by tournament play. 

"From the start of the season, 
we've been playing all the top teams in 
the conference," he said in reference to 
the team's record. However, "Delaware 
County Community College beat us by 
14 points and they're tied for first place 
in the conference." 

One strong point of the team is the 
offense. "Our offense is better than 
most teams in the league, however, the 
defense needs work." 

Leading scorers include Mark 
Smith, who averages 10.8 points a 
game; Tim Rodgers, 10.7; Bill Kauf- 
man, 11. 1; and Dave Durham, 14.0. 

"We'll possibly have three or four 
new players starting," he said, and 
noted that they looked "pretty promis- 
ing." 

The next scheduled game is at 3 
p.m. Saturday, Jan. 12, at home against 
Northhampton County Community 
College. 

"Northhampton isn't very big, but 
they're pretty strong," Peters said. He 
believes the Wildcats can pull through 
with the knowledge of Northhampton's 
previous performance against other 
teams. 



Over 7,000 persons attended the 
1983 Open House at the College. 



BENSON 



out mini. ^ 
l^tnmarket 



Coiner of 3id and Maynord Sts, 



Always Open: 
All Night 
Sundays 
and Holidays 




SPOTLIGHTDMondiy, Januir; 14, I985d3 

College to receive state bond issue 

By Kilhryn M. Gilbert 
SPOTLIGHT AdminislriUve Affairs Editor 

The College will receive $1,243,572 people from the company will be mak- 

as its share of the $190 million bond ing use of the laboratories, 
issue approved by the Pennsylvania Publication of a student viewbook 

voters. Dr. Robert L. Breuder, College produced under the direction of Dr. 

president, stated at the College Board of Miles Williams, dean of employee and 

Trustees meeting held Jan. 7. community relations, to recruit students 

Dr. Breuder said $1,140,885 of to the College was presented at the 
money will be used to upgrade equip- meeting. This publication will supple- 
ment in the College's post-secondary ment the College catalog and other Col- 
vo-tech education. Also, money from lege publications, 
the bond issue was established to lower A change of title for Dr. Cathryn 
the State's unemployment rate, and help Addy from Associate Dean of North 
the economy through inflow of Campus to Dean of North Campus was 
thousands of new jobs. The money mu; . approved, 
be spent by mid-1986. The board approved Kevin Bryer- 

Anotner issue discussed was the ton as a temporary full-time replace- 

trustees' approval of legally required ment instructor. Electrical Technolgy 

transfer of property used for the Allied Division, effective retroactive to Jan. 2, 

Advanced Technoloev and Allied to the earlier of May 1 1 or the return of 

Health Services Building and 17 other the regular instructor, Anthonv 

College construction projects. Ihe Guravage. Byerton has an associate 

trustees are not allowed to hold title to degree in electrical construction from 

any property and must transfer owner- the College, and approximately 10 years 

ship to the State until the projects are of professional experience, 
completed. Employment of David Golfiere as 

The trustees approved a number of evening College Activities Assistant, In- 
new courses to College curriculums, and tramural Athletics and College Ac- 
revisions to existing courses. This tivities, effective retroactive Jan. 2, was 
semester the College will be offering a approved. Golfiere has a bachelor of 
microcomputer course for one credit science degree in education from the 
hour. This course gives the College the former Lock Haven State College and 
opportunity to use their two microcom- has approximately two years of related 
puter laboratories. Officials noted that professional experience including 
the College has had an excellent employment at the College as a part- 
response to this program from the com- lime physical education instructor. Ex- 
munity. Twenty-five chief executives tended employment of Debra Kiess as 
from Stroehmann Brothers Company temporary full-time program assistant 
used the laboratories in December. In of the Displaced Homemaker Program, 
January and February an additional 50 was approved effective Dec. 22, 1984 
through June 28, 1985. 



HYBRID ICE 

Performs Wednesday 

January 16 

8:00 to 10:30 p.nn. 

Sponsored by 
Student Government Association (SGA) 

Admission $1 with validated I.D. 
$2without. 



J 



JOE MIGNANO'S SUB SHOP 


CORNER OF 2nd & MAYNARD 


PHONE 323-7443 




One Block from W.A.C.C. 


Daily Specials Monday Regular Sub Whole $1.60 

Tuesday Meatball Whole $1.75 

^ _^^ Wednesday Turkey Whole $1.40 

'^O^^ Thursday Ham Whole $1.80 

Friday Tuna Whole $1.70 

Saturday Cheese Steak Whole $2.50 

Hours: Mon.-Sat. U a.m. lo 9 p.m. Closed Sun. 



4aSPOTLIGHTDMoiida)r, Jniuy 14, IMS 

"CAMPUf ACTIVITIES ^ 

For the week of Monday, Jan. 14 through Sunday, Jan. 20 
MOVIE 
"Sudden lnipicl"...7:30 this evening, Academic Center Auditorium, $1 ad- 
mission with validated College ID, $2 admission for all others. 
ACTIVITIES 
Used Book Sale.. .Today, Monday, Jan. 14 through Feb. I, Phi Beta Lambda 
office, Room 3, Academic Center basement. 

Rollerskaling...8 p.m. to midnight, this Thursday, Jan. 17, at Skating Plus, 
$2 admission or free to faculty, staff and students With validated College ID; skate 
rentals, 75 cents; sponsored by Student Government Association. 

Concert/Dance: Hybrid Ice... 8 - 10:30 p.m., this Wednesday, Jan. 16, in the 
Gymnasium, $1 with validated ID, $2 admission for all others; sponsored by SGA. 
Downhill Skiing... 5 p.m. to midnight, this Wednesday, Jan. 16, at Ski 
Sawmill, Morris, PA, sponsored by College Activities. 
MEETINGS 
Narcotics Anonymous... 7 p.m., this Wednesday, Jan. 16, Room 118, 
Building Trades Center. 

Sludenl Government Association... Executive Committee, 4 p.m. tomorrow, 
Jan. 15, Room BI07, Lifelong Education Center. 

SPORTS 

Basketball... 7:30 p.m., this Wednesday, Jan. 16, against Montgomery County 
Community College, away. 

Buketbill...3 p.m. this Saturday, Jan. 19, against Lehigh County Communi- 
ty College, home. 



Part-time job openings 

li{fomalion provided by Lawrence W. Emery, director o/counseting, career development and 
placement 

Tompkins' Janitorial Serviced needs a dependable, local student to work eight 
to ten hours a week, nights or late evenings. Four hours a day, two days a week or 
fewer hours and more days. Call Jack Tompkins in the afternoon. No morning 
calls. 



iN 



ABC Bowling Lanes 
College League 

sign-ups 

Men. Women, or Mixed 
Four Persons per Team 

League starts at 4 p.m. 
Tuesday, Jan. 15 



Price is $3 and includes free shoes 



ABC Bowling Lanes 

1245 Park Avenue (at Rose St.) 
Phone: 326-2885 



Free Trophies 

and banquet 

provided by 

ABC Bowling Lanes 



College ID required to 
use gym or weight room 

Students must present College ID 
and sign in for any activity in the Gym- 
nasium, according to David A. Golfieri, 
evening activities assistant. 

Besides name and time, use of 
weight room or gym should be specified 
when signing in. 

Golfieri said that a semester-long 
survey is being conducted to see where 
the main interest is in the facility. "This 
will enable us to develop our program 
more towards the interest of the 
students," he added. 

Golfieri also reminded students to 
keep all outside shoes off the gym floor. 
"It will help preserve the floor," he 
said, "especially in bad weather." 

Classified Ads 

FOR SALE 
1973 Ford Gran Torino. Good studeni 
car in fair condition. $500 or best of- 
fer. Call Gisela al ExI. 221 

Will type papers, reports, resumes, 
inexpensively, neatly. Call 
717-546-8735 after 5 p.m. 

WANTED 

Female lead singer for area band, 
keyboard experience helpful, but not 
required. Contact Mike Lyons al 
546-3362. 

WANTED: One copy of Ibe 
(ollowing newspapers: THE SUN 
(Hummelstown); BELLEFONTE 
CENTRE DEMOCRAT (Bellefonte); 
THE EVENING SENTINEL 
(Cariisle); THE VALLEY TIMES 
STAR (Newville); BROCKWAY 
RECORD (Brockway); DUNCAN- 
NON RECORD (Duncannon); THE 
WEEKLY BULLETIN (Dillsburg); 
MARIETTA SUSQUEHANNA 
TIMES (Marietta); VALLEY VIEW 
CITIZEN STANDARD (Valley View); 
PERRY COUNTY TIMES (New 
Bloomfield); THE NEWS ITEM 
(Shamokin); THE VALLEY 
OBSERVER (Belleville); UPPER 
DAUPHIN SENTINEL (MiUersburg); 
WEST SHORE TIMES 

(Mechanicsburg). 

Anyone with copies of these 
newspapers should bring them to the 
SPOTLIGHT office. Room 7, 
Academic Center (basement). All con- 
tributors will be reimbursed. 



Le Jeune Chef 
evening meals 
to begin Jan. 16 

le Jeune Chef, the student- 
operated restaurant, will resume serving 
evening meals from 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. 
on Wednesday, Jan. 16 and Thursday, 
Jan. 17, according to Mrs. Sue L. Ben- 
nett, coordinator of food services. 

Managed by the quantity produc- 
tion students, the meals will feature 
soups, salads, and breads with an entre; 
including vegetables. For the weight- 
conscious, Thursday's menu will offer a 
calorie controlled meal. 

Prices for the meals will be $3.50. 
Desserts are a la carte. Reservations will 
be accepted by calling ext. 369. 
Wednesday 

Soup, Potage St. Germaine (cream 
of fresh pea soup); salad, Belgian endive 
and watercress salad with sauce 
remoulade; broiled flank steak 
marinade with sauce Champignon, 
Pommes Risole (sauteed potato balls), 
Epinard Veloute (pureed spinach with 
cream), crusty French bread, fruit tart. 
Thursday 

Soup, Golden Harvest orsherried 
mushroom consomme; salad of eastern 
greens, Chicken Breast Veronique 
(sauteed with grapes and cream) or 
Vineyard Chicken (herb-wine poach 
with grapes), spring carrots with herbed 
rice or braised green peas with lettuce, 
San Francisco style sour dough bread. 
Hot Cannoli ice cream crepes with fudge 
sauce or Swedish cranberry sorbet. 

Beverages are coffee, tea, and iced 



Equipment prohibited 
in Rec Center 

Cafeteria equipment from the Sus- 
quehanna Room - trays, plates, glasses, 
utensils, etc. - is prohibited in the ad- 
joining Recreation Center, according to 
Mrs. JoAnn R. Fremiotti, coordinator 
of intramural athletics and College ac- 
tivities. 

She added that anyone entering the 
Center with equipment will be asked to 
leave, and anyone caught disposing of 
the equipment will have their ID held 
and reported to Security for appropriate 
action. 



CILLO'S COLLECxE CORNER 

We'll prepare your favorite Subs and Burgers the way 
you like them! 

Play LUCKY NUMBERS and win a half sub plus a medium 
drink. Four winners every week! 

Cillo's College Corner 

1 100 W. Third St.,Williamsport 

(Next to Academic Center) Phone Ahead: 322-1321 

Hours: 7:30 a.m. to 6 p.m. 
Fri. 7:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. 





The clock helps decide. 



lilH 



■ IB 



WITH ONLY SECONDS 
s were on their 
iclory. 
[Story, Page 4.1 



tTll-ILi|T.l left, the Wildcats were on their 
IXblll. liJ „gy (g another victory 



Atsu insiue: 
Dean's List Pages 6 - 10 

Free ID's end Page 10 

Campus doin's Page 12 




Moidi;, Juur; 21, ins • Vol M, No. M • nPigci 
Williimiport Am Comnmlt} CoDetc • WBSuipoit, Pi. mil 



4i 



fnn 



St 900 pack Gym for Hybrid Ice 




Photos by LeRoy S. Whitmire Jr. 



LEAD VOCALIST Chris 
Alburger also contributes his 
talents to the band by playing se- 
cond guitar. 



Story by Wanna F. Brown 



CROWD PLEASER Bob Richards cops a smirii and a wink while taking 
over lead vocals, as Rusty Kouike strums into action. 



Band chats: Boston recording one of their hits 



Hybrid Ice, an east-coast band, 
performed for the student body last 
Wednesday night, Jan. 16, in the Col- 
lege gymnasium. According to David A. 
Golfieri, evening College activities assis- 
tant, 895 people attended the 
dance/concert, sponsored by the Stu- 
dent Government Association. 

Hybrid Ice plays what they call 
"American party rock and roll," and 
they're currently working on their se- 



cond album which should be released rn 
the summer, with a video to follow. 

"Jeff Willoughby (bass). Rusty 
Kouike (guitars), and I started playing 
in a band together in the tenth grade," 
Rick Klinger, drummer of the group, 
said. "We started and we just didn't 
slop~we still haven't." 

Other group members are Chris 
Alburger, lead singer and second guitar 
and Bob Richards, keyboards. 



Klinger added that Hybrid Ice has 
been together as a road band for about 
ten years. "Mainly, we play bars and 
we play under-21 nights," he said. 
"Whenever we play for the groups like 
Toto and the Beach Boys, we get a lot 
of exposure, and we became more wide- 
ly known in the Eastern part of the 
United States, which is great!" Klinger 
exclaimed. "Isn't that what it's all 
about?" 



r 



BASSIST Jeff Willoughby is one 
of Hybrid Ice's co-founders. 




Klinger said he wanted to set the 
record straight and put an end to 
rumors. "The band is not breaking up 
and we did not sell the rights to the song 
Magdolin. " 

He said, "Boston is doing the song 
and they will be putting it on their third 
album, even though Hybrid Ice retains 
the rights." 



ZaSPOTUGHTDMoidi;, Juiirr 21, IMS 

'Starman' is 



romantic sci-fi 



From My Desk 




editor's Note: From My Desk is a feature intertded to permit staff members 
to make irtdividual comment on sub/ects of particular interest to them. Opinion is 



Movl* R«vl«w 
Kelly S. Hcrrold 

II you're in the mood to see a 
heartwarming, yet very lunny movie. 
Starman Is the one to see. Starring JeH 
Bridges as the innocent yet highly In- 
telligent alien, Starman truly is the 
science (iciion love story ol today. 

The movie opens with the usual 
"alien visits planet Earth" plot. Starman 
crashes near the home ol an attractive 
young women. He changes himsell In- 
to an exact image ol the woman's 
deceased huSband. The widow, por- 
trayed by co-star Karen Allen, linds 
hersell in many unusual predicaments. 

Just as the movie reaches its 
peal<, she finds out that she must help 
Starman get bacl< to his home planet. 
To make matters worse, she realizes 
she really loves him. And yes, he also 
loves her. 

Producer John Carpenter went 
overboard with this classic Starman is 
an energetic, yet highly emotional 
movie that proves love surely con- 
quers all obstacles no matter what the 
circumstances are. 

This reviewer applauds the etforl 
put Into the making ol this lilm. It's one 
movie anyone would enjoy. 



That's what I think everytime I find mysell caught up in another line here at 
the College 

I was all optimistic about starling my linal semester here, and Lord knows it's 
very hard to be optimistic on the first day ol classes Well, that ended when I went 
over to the bookstore to buy my books Standing in line lor an hour to spend an 
arm and a leg on books really isn't my idea ol an enticing first day At that, when I 
finally got back to the SPOTLIGHT office, I discovered that I had been given the 
wrong book. Another hall hour in the cash line, and I was llnally set and ready to 
go. as lar as my books were concerned. 

Luckily, the book I took back was an outrageously priced $32 advertising 
book. Unlortunately, the store didn't have the book I needed, so my guess is that 
they'll have my $32 back before too long. 

Did you ever notice that the shortest line moves the slowest, especially II 
you're in it? As a perfect way to end the day, I ligured I had better get my ID 
validated. When I got to the Rec Center, there were 10 people in line. I thought, 
"WonderluM" Five minutes, slap a sticker on my card and I can check this off my 
list... 

That was 2:20, When I llnally got to the second person in line It was 3:35. A 
lady came out ol the office and explained to the line ol 30 people that the com- 
puter had been running all day, and since it was too warm, it was temporarily shut 
down. When I llnally got out of there, It was 3:50-all lor a sticker that reads "Spr- 
ing 1985" on a card I'll probably use twice the whole semester. 

I'm sure my first day back was not unlike the other 2,000 or so students who 
also came back lor the llrsl day ol classes. There has to be a better way to gel 
through these trivial, laborious tasks. Maybe something should be set up so 
students can get their IDs validated during registration, thus, killing two birds with 
one stone 

As a solution to the hassle ol buying books on campus, maybe the instruc- 
tors should have the name ol the text they plan to use printed on the schedule ol 
classes (the guide your adviser gives you to help you schedule you classes) so at 
least some ol the students can purchase their books ahead ol time, thus 
ellmlnaling some ol the lirst day rush to the bookstore and allowing students the 
lime to search for their required lexis in other bookstores in the area. 

These Ideas may not be very practical or even acceptable, but at least It's a 
start. Maybe In the lulure, there will be a better way to do these things. 



New York City Blues 

Editor's Nole: This satirical anicle was submilled by Scon R. Papp, a computer science slu- 
denl of Eldred. 

Last Saturday was my lirst trip to New York City, I have heard some really 
wild things about big cities: smog, enormous trallic jams and crime in the streets. 
But my Iriends never prepared me for the biggest shock ol my life, I have found 
all other drawbacks In New York City rather trivial when compared with the shor- 
tage ol public toilets. 

My lirst urge came as I stepped off the bus in front ol Rockefeller Center. Like 
a crazed mother lunging for the last Cabbage Patch doll, I exploded into the RCA 
Building in search of "comlort facilities", II was here that I lirst encountered the in- 
linlle line thai I would become lamlliar with through the course ol the day. This 
was one traffic jam that required a referee rather than a Iralfic cop. After wading 
through the human Hood, I was shocked to the point of constipation when I stood 
before a derelict sleeping in the trough, I fled in search of moreprivaleaccom- 
modations. 

I happened upon a lamlliar Iriend, the Burger King, I ordered a soft drink to 
convince my conscience ol my patronage. I realized my mistake a hall hour later 
while still waiting for the bathroom. As I approached the door, it dawned on me 
what 11,., So quickly I stole a napkin or two from on old lady eating at a table next 
to the waiting line. As Murphy's Law would have It. it was a good idea to rob that 
crippled old lady. 

Alter hours ol furious shopping, my last stop was dinner at world-lamous 
Mama Leone's Restaurant, And It is here, where the best food is served that the 
bathroom lines are the longest. However, I have discovered one advantage in 
making new acquaintances during our mutual delay, I lound that the two 
gentlemen in line behind me were also lirsl timers in the Big Apple "I will 
apologize lor what's to come, but I was out partying last night," I said. Both men, 
Irom Shippensburg State, put me al ease by replying that they they too were in a 
stale ol regret lor the previous evening's lestivities 

Upon arriving in my narrow stall, I realized another benefit ol "going in New 
York City, As there was no coat hook, and the lloor was saturated Irom what I 
hoped was a plumbing leak, Irelined my balancing skills, it was a feat worthy ol a 
circus juggler to squat over the "throne" holding my coat and a bag of newly pur- 
chased Christmas presents Irom Macy's, And to top It all off, when I went to the 
sinks to wash my hands, a feeble Italian man stood by with a towel for drying As I 
thanked him, I saw the saucer tilled with dollar bills and recognized what an ironic 
misadventure this was, 

in conclusion, I hope you will profit Irom my unique experience in New York 
City, I will leave two pieces of advice First, remember the motto ol all good 
scouts, "Be prepared" But even more important as the great philosopher Karl 
Maiden remarked about the lack ol toiled lacilities in New York City "Don't leave 
home without it!" 



Cop shows 
are predictable 

TV Review by Jennifer S. White 

Police and detective shows have 
been around since television began. 
They haven't changed at all over the 
years. No matter what crime has been 
committed, the bad guy always gets 
caught or killed. 

These programs are intended to 
be entertaining and relaxing. Who can 
relax when T.J. Hooker has a gunlight 
with the criminal? What kind ol 
entertainment is it to watch the victim 
drop dead? Besides all this, there is the 
ever present factor ol knowing the end. 

There Is one difference-the 
criminals in today's shows are worse. 
Their techniques are more advanced, 
and their crimes are more terrrilylng. 

I don't enjoy these programs 
anymore. They are loo easy to ligure 
out, usually within the lirst ten minutes. 
Even with an unexpected twist, the bad 
guy always gels caught. 

For once I would like to see a 
show about the one that got away. 

Cartoons, letters to the 
editor, and other 
commentary-type material 
for publication may be sub- 
mitted to the editorial page 
editor of the Spotlight, at 
Room 7 of the Academic 
Center, by noon Tuesday 
before the next date of 
publication. 



Rate hike a failure 
need better service 

SPOTLIQHT Commentary 

Another Increase Soon, to give so- 
meone your "two cents" will cost you 
22 cents via the United Stales Postal 
Service 

Eltective February 17. first class 
postage will increase by two cents. 

According to postal officials al the 
Williamsport, Post Office, it will cost 
1 4 cents 10 mail a post card (up 1 cent) 
and third and lourth class bulk rates 
will also increase. 

Television networks reported that 
the consistent postal rale climb 
averages 1 cent every year. The in- 
crease is due to a 2.7 percent pay in- 
crease for postal employees hired 
before July 21 , 1 984, as well as to bet- 
ter the service provided by the system. 

Has the service gotten any better? 
Is it worth the public's extra money to 
pay for the 2.7 percent wage Increase 
and supposed better service? 

What about all the mail we affec- 
tionately call "junk mail," which we 
throw away without opening? Most of 
this kind ol mail Is sent on a bulk 
postage rate, which Is less expensive 
than first class mail. Perhaps these 
companies should include a postage 
paid card with their llyers and catalogs 
that reads: D / am not interested in 
your product: please lake my name oft 
your mailing list. Thank you. (Name). 

This could possibly help cut down 
on the amount ol "junk mail" that 
makes our postal system so Inetlicient. 

Only when oustanding service 
warrants it, should postal employees 
receive a wage increase, and only 
when the service is better. Is the postal 
system justilied in raising its rates. 

The Riverboat Ragtime Revue was 
the first public event staged in the 
Auditorium following its renovation, in 
Fall 1983. 



SPOTLIGHT 
Monday, January 21, 1985 ■ Vol. 20, No. 20 

Tile SPOTLIGHT is pubiistied each Monday 
morning of tiie academic year, except (or Col- 
lege vacations, by )ournaiism and ottier in- 
terested students of The Williamsport Area Com- 
munity College, 

Office Room 7. Academic Center. 1005 
W, Third SI. Williamsport. Pa 17701. 
Telephone- (717) 326-3761. Extension 221, 



Opinions expressed are those of the student 
newspaper or o( those whose names accom- 
pany Items Opinions do not reflect oHicial opi- 
nion ol the institution. 



THE STAFF 

Karen M Metarko. Managing Editor 

James K Morrlssey, Editorial Page Edilor 

Richard E Kopp Jr , Ptiologfapiiy Edilor 

Donna M Barnetl. Datkioom Tectinician 

Kathryn M Gilbert, Adminislrative Affairs Edilor 

Wanna F, Brown, Sludenl Allans Edilor 

Sandra R, Taylor. Advertising Manager 

Anne T fvloratelli, Adverllsing Assistant 

Kathleen L, Eiswert, Sporfs Edilor 

Giseia D Grassiey, Pioducllon Supervisor 

Rodney D Hiii, Mark S Schwanke. 

Senior Slali Wrilers 

BEPOHTEBS/STAFF ASSOCIATES 

Cynthia E A Hartranft, Keiiy S Herrold. 
dandra L Musgrave, Judith L, Swinehart. Jen- 
nifer S While, LeRoy S Whitmire Jr 

Faculty adviser: Anthony N Clllo, 

Acting adviser: Mrs Louise H, Sweeney- 
Production Stall This Issue 

Richard E Kopp Jr., vldeocompositlon; 
James K Morrissey. copy editor, and Wanna F, 
Brown and Judltii L, Swinehart, production 
assistants, 



College foundation collects $350,000 
in donations from local industries 



Provided by College litformalion Office 

During last year, nearly $350,000 
in donations of equipment have been 
made to the Williamsport Area Com- 
munity College Foundation Inc. for the 
Transportation Technologies Division 
with donations ranging from aircraft 
engines to diesel engine parts, according 
to Frederick T. Gilmour, executive 
director. 

Gilmour stated, "The need for 
donations of products and equipment 
becomes all too apparent when one 
looks at the overall College picture. 
Transportation Technology is just one 
of eight academic divisions at the Col- 
lege. Nearly all of the programs are 
costly to maintain, especially in these 
days of fast-changing technological ad- 
vances. Gifts such as turbine engines are 
invaluable in terms of training and 
economic support for the College." 

"A piece of equipment that may 
have become inadequate to a company 
in terms of production tolerances can be 
used for a time by instructors in training 
labs, " Gilmour added. 

Gilmour recently listed the pieces 
of equipment donated to the division. 
Avco-Lycoming Williamsport Division 
donated an LT 101 turbine engine and a 
10-720-DlCD aircraft engine. Fair 
market value of the two engines is over 
;$125,000. 

Mobile Research and Development 
Corporation, Research Department, 
Paulsboro Laboratory in New Jersey, 
donated a Cummins 290 diesel truck 
engine, complete with accessories. Ben- 
son Trucking of Mansfield RD 1, 
donated a Detroit 8V-92 diesel truck 
engine. 

John Powell Chevrolet of 
Williamsport presented the College with 
a 1984 four-wheel drive half-ton pick- 
up. Shims Pontiac dealership of 
Williamsport gave the College a 1984 
Oldsmobile Cutlass V-6 and a 1984 
GMC diesel truck. 



Susquehanna Motor Company of 
West Milton donated two Mack truck 
diesel engines and B.T.R. Inc., of 
Milton RD 2, gave the College an 
8-V-71T Detroit diesel engine. Two 
DT-466 diesel truck engines were 
donated by International Harvester 
Co., Fort Wayne Product Reliability 
Center, Fort Wayne, Ind. 

Bucknell University, Lewisburg, 
donated a generator set and one com- 
plete Continental diesel engine and Chip 
Trucking Inc., of Mountville, presented 
an engine and various parts. Grumman- 
Olson of Montgomery, donated a 
Volkswagen front wheel drive assembly. 

And Joseph L. Kowalski of 
Williamsport gave the College a 1972 
Dodge coupe, and Williamsport 
Automotive donated 13 tool panels. 

PBL dance at Sheraton 
to be held Valentine's Day 

A dance which is open to all Col- 
lege students, will be held at the 
Sheraton Inn in Downtown 
Williamsport as part of National Phi 
Beta Lambda week, according to 
Jonathan F. Miller, a computer science 
student of Williamsport and PBL presi- 
dent. 

The event will take place on Valen- 
tine's Day, February 14, at 7:30 p.m. 
and will feature Top 40 music. Admis- 
sion will be $2. 

A box of candy will be raffled off, 
and the winner will receive the prize the 
night of the dance, said Miller. Tickets 
will be available in the PBL office, 
Room 3, Academic Center. 

PBL will also be selling lollipops 
during PBL week for 25 cents. This 
money will be used to send PBL 
members to the state conference. 

PBL will also be selling "Fuzzies". 
According to Miller, they are com- 
parable to "little mice" and are 
available in the PBL office for $1. 



JPOTUGHTOMoiidir, Jinairi :i, 19«5d3 

Club input wanted for Open House activity report 

Student organizations that would like to participate in the College's annual 
Open House may contact Mrs. JoAnn R. Fremiotti, coordinator of intramural 
athletics and College activities, by Monday Jan. 28 to enable completion of an ac- 
tivity report. 

Request to sponsor food vending operations must be cleared through Mrs. 
Fremiotti prior to Feb. 4. This year's theme is "20 Years of Service". Open House 
is scheduled for Sunday, March 24, noon to 4:30 p.m. 

Mrs. Fremiotti's extension is 269. 



STONEY STEAMER'S 

WORLD FAMOUS HOT DOGS 

Steamed in Beer! 



<y 




Jan. 23, 1 0:00 - 2:00 Academic Center 
Sponsored by ARTISTS UNLIMITED 



168 graduate last semester 

Provided by College Information Office 
A total of 168 students graduated 

from the College in December 1984, 

earning associate degrees or certificates 

from one of the College's 60 programs 

offered. 

The majority of graduated students 

were from the counties of Lycoming and 

Clinton. 

10 scholarships offered 

Five scholarships will be offered to 
Dental Hygiene students who will enter 
their second year in the program in Fall 
1985.These are nationwide scholarships. 

To apply for these scholarships the 
general criteria are: A need of at least 
$1,500 in financial aid; complete one 
year in the curriculum with at least a 3.0 
grade point average (GPA); and be a 
full time student. The applicant must 
submit a CSS by March 1, 1985, have 
the American Dental Hygienists' 
Association Foundation Needs Assess- 
ment form to the Financial aid office by 
April 1, and have all application 
material at the Foundation office by 
May 1. 

If you are interested in these 
scholarships please get in touch with the 
Health Sciences' office. Room 209 of 
the Academic Center. 

Five scholarships are also available 
for blind students. The deadline is 
March 31, for the following academic 
year. 

The scholarships are awarded on 
the basis of academic excellence, service 
to the community and financial need. 

Information on these scliolarships 
can be obtained from Ms. Kathy Fer- 
rence in Room 157, Learning Resources 
Center (LRC). 

Stroehmann executives 
take computer classes 

Executives from Stroehmann 
Brothers Company will be attending 
three three-day seminars on microcom- 
puters, according to Ms. Sandra L. 
Rosenberger, coordinator of center for 
business and industry advancement. 

William T. Ward, infonnation 
center software/device specialist will be 
instructing the group on the use of 
LOTUS. 

Ms. Rosenberger also noted that 
chief executives previously attended a 
similar course in February. 

Miss Charlotte Maxwell will teach 
a course in small business training call- 
ed "Home Based Business/ A Viable 
Alternative" through the College, ac- 
cording to Ms. Rosenberger. 

Miss Maxwell set up her own 
business in RD 1 Williamsport two 
years ago after being laid off. Today she 
runs a successful collection agency. 



Increased enrollment 
at College experienced 
for last Fall 

Courtesy College Information Office 

According to official enrollment 
reports, the College experienced a 1.51 
percent increase in equivalent full-time 
students and had a headcouni enroll- 
ment increase of 128 students for this 
Fall. Total College enrollment is 4,048 
with 3,490.7 equivalent full-time 
students (EFTS). 

Three academic divisions and the 
North Campus in Wellsboro experienc- 
ed increases in EFTS, namely in the 
business and computer technologies, in- 
tegrated studies, and non-degree offer- 
ings. 

Attendance breakdown 

A new report breaks down the 
headcount enrollments within each divi- 
sion by day, night, weekend, or one of 
four combinations. Of the 54,831 
credits generated, 87.8 percent were 
during the day, 11.2 percent were dur- 
ing the night, and one percent on the 
weekend. Although 1,646 students take 
classes at night, only 522 (31.7 percent) 
of them are exclusively night students. 
By headcount, 2,328 students took 
classes only during the day, 522 nights 
only, 80 only on weekends, 1,058 took 
classes days and evenings, 30 days and 
weekends, 34 nights and weekends, and 
32 took classes days, nights and 
weekends. 

Feoiile enrollmenl increased 

Reports note that on the Main 
Campus, 63 percent of the students are 
male and with a two percent increase 
over last year, 37 percent are female. 
The North Campus is 25 percent male 
and 75 percent female and overall the 
College has a 61 percent male popula- 
tion and a 39 percent female popula- 
tion. Females on both campuses ac- 
count for the largest percentage (59 per- 
cent) of part-time students. 

Age figures calculiled 

The College's population is slightly 
older in average from a year ago with a 
mean age of 23 years and nine months. 
The largest percentage of the population 
(70.6 percent) is 25 years of age and 
younger. The average age of men and 
women according to their attendance 
status compare as follows: full-time 
men, 21.1 years old, part-time men, 32 
years, full-time women, 22.6 years, and 
part-time women, 31.5 years of age. 

Seventy-five percent of the 
College's students read the 
SPOTLIGHT, according to a survey 
conducted by the student-operated 
newspaper last spring. 



4DSI>OTLlGHTDMoicb>, JtiiMj 21. 1M5 



Wildcats triumph in a close game 



Intramural Athletic 'Roundup' 



"The learn really came through at 
the end," commented Athletic coor- 
dinator Harry C. Specht on the 
Wildcats' 55-50 victory over Nor- 
thampton Community College last 
Saturday. The win pushes their record 
up to 3-6. 

Six foot two, 195 pounds, Bill 
Kaufman was the high scorer for the 
Wildcats, followed by freshman David 
Durham and Jack Schultz. 

Northampton trailed the Wildcats ; 
during the first half of play with a 30-23 
score at halftime. 

The opponents came back in the se- 
cond half edging the Wildcats 27-25 but 
the Wildcats pulled through to beat 
Northampton i. 

"The game went very well," 
Specht said, considering there were on- 
ly 3 or 4 days of practice due to the 
Christmas break. 

With a crowd of nearly 70 spec- 
tators, he was "very pleased" at the at- 
tendance for this game, as well as the 
overall turnout at home games. 
"Weeknight home games averaged 
around 100 people," he added. 

This week the Wildcats will be 




Norlhimpton allempis to block as 
the Wildcats Bill Kaufman makes the 
shut. 

playing Bucks County Community Col- 
lege at 8 p.m. tomorrow, away. They 
will also challenge Philadelphia Com- 
munity College at home this Friday at 8 
p.m. 



Ice skating, skiing, tobogganing trips 
to be offered over next five weeks 

The Intramural Athletics and ColleRc Activities Office is sDonsorins three ice 
skating trips to Sunbury Youth and Community Center, Sunbury, on Thursday 
Jan. 24, Thursday, Feb. 7, and Thursday, Feb. 28, according to Mrs. JoAnn R. 
Fremiolti, coordinator of intramural athletics and College activities. 

Transportation leaves the Learning Resources Center (LRC) at 5:30 p.m. and 
will return at 10 p.m. 

Skate rentals are 50 cents, and the trip is free to students, faculty, and staff 
with admission tickets and validated College ID's. 

In addition, downhill skiing trips at Ski Sawmill in Morris are offered on 
Wednesday, Jan. 23, Wednesday, Feb. 6, Wednesday, Feb. 13, and Wednesday, 
Feb 27. 

Transportation will leave the LRC bus loop at 5 p.m. and return at 12 a.m. 

Discounts are being offered; however, students must present a validated Col- 
lege ID and rates must be payable to Ski Sawmill. 

Also offered are tobogganing trips to Eagles Mere on Sunday, Feb. 3 and Sun- 
day, Feb. 17. 

Transportation leaves the LRC at 10 a.m. and returns at 3 p.m. The trips are 
free to students, faculty, and staff with tickets and validated ID. 

Students may pick up tickets and sign up for all activities in Room A137, 
Recreation Center office in the Lifelong Education Center. 



Practic e chnics begin this week for 
volley- I students who have signed 
ball I up for the intramural 
volleyball tournament, according to 
David A. Golfieri, evening activities 
assistant. 

Two participant practice sessions 
have been scheduled. The first cUnic will 
be held from 7-9 p.m. tomorrow in the 
gym. The second will be held from 8-10 
p.m. Wednesday, also in the gym. "In- 
dividuals must attend either of the 
clinics to participate in the 
tournament," Golfieri noted. 

Persons interested in officiating at 
the volleyball tournament may attend 
the participant clinic to sharpen their 
skills in officiating for the tournament, 
he said. 

The officials' clinic has been plann- 
led from 4 to 5 p.m. this evening in the 
gym. 

The following are the teams listed 
to play in the intramural volleyball 
tournament to begin at 6:30 p.m. 
Thursday, in the gym. 

Division l-Court I 
6:30 p.m. Payton Gang vs. 
Plunkers 

7:30 p.m. Ball Bangers vs. 
Bums 

8:30 p.m. Payton Gang vs. Bail 
Bangers 



Division 2-Court 2 
6:30 p.m. Scumbuzzards vs. 
Grace St. Fudge Packers 
7:30 p.m. Eliminators vs. 
Dudley's 

8:30 p.m. Straub Greenies vs. 
Hackers 

• •• 
On ano ther note, Golfieri reminds 
intramural basketball 
captains to stop by 



basket- 

ball . . 

Room 108 in the gym to pick up a copy 
of game rules. 

Practice time for intramural 
basketball may be scheduled by calling 
the Recreation Center office. College 
Ext. 412, according to Golfieri. 

The following teams have been 
listed for the intramural basketball tour- 
nament scheduled to begin at 6:30 p.m. 
Wednesday evening in the gym. 
6:30 p.m. Dunk-u-very-much 
vs. Bums. 
7:30 p.m. 
Town. 

8:30 p.m. Payton Gang vs. In- 
dependents. 

• •• 

Rosters for the intramural wrestling 
wresi- I must be submitted to the 
ling I Recreation Center by 

4p.m. on Jan. 24. Name, curriculum 
and weight should be included. 



Moondogs vs. G 




Catch 



SPOTLIGHT 



on the Wildcats 
...in action! 

.Attend this week's 
games tomorrow 
and Friday! 



• Intramural eligibility rules > 



BASKETBALL COACH Andrew Peters advises while learn member Mark 
Smith guzzles during last Saturday's game. /See basketball story al lop of page 
for game results.] 

Gym hours explained 

Students interested in using the 
gym this week may schedule the east or 
west end of the gym for a one-hour time 
period when space is available, accor- 
Eligibility requirements for par- D. Any team playing with an in- jing to David A. Golfieri, evening ac- 

ticipalion in College intramural athletics eligible member will forfeit all events in tivities assistant, 
have been decided according to infor- which that person participated. "Maximum amount of participants 

mation given by David A. Golfieri, E. An individual (participant or jj 12," he noted, 

spectator) who acts in an unsport- 
smanlike manner is subject to suspen- 
sion from further intramural activities. 
F. Every participant is responsible 



evenmg activites assistant. 

A. Any full-time student, faculty 
or staff of the College is eligible to par- 
ticipate in the College's intramural ac- 
tivities. 

B. A player is eligible to enter as 
an individual participant or as a 
member of a team only once for each 
different intramural activity offered. 

C. Any member of a varsity squad 
is not eligible to participate in an in- 
tramural activity of the same or related 
activity to which he/she is presently a 
participant. 



Students who would like to 
schedule gym space should sign up bet- 
ween 8 a.m. and 2 p.m. in Room 
A-137, Recreation Center, in the gym. 



for knowing and adhering to all rules Time and space availability will be on 



and regulations governing each 
tramural activity. 

Any questions concerning the Col- 
lege's intramural athletic program 
should be directed to Mrs. JoAnn R. 
Fremiotti, coordinator of intramural 
athletics and College activities, in Room 
108 of the Bardo Gym. 



hand when students sign up, according 
to Golfieri. 

He added that the gym will only be 
available to non-intramural participants 
and only through this sign-up pro- 
cedure. 

The weight room will be open from 
4 to 10 p.m. this evening and tomorrow 
evening. 



Drs. Breuder, Doyle, Hurley 
attend two-day ACCT seminar 



SPOTUGRTOMonU;, Jininr 21, IMSoS 



pCampus Candids- 



B; Karen M. Melirko 



Dr. Robert L. Breuder, College 
president, and Dr. Daniel J. Doyle, pro- 
fessor of government, history, sociology 
and philosophy, traveled to Charleston, 
South Carolina, as part of a seminar 
with the Association of Community 
College Trustees (ACCT), held Friday, 
Jan. 18 and Saturday, Jan 19. 

The two presented a workshop on 
Lgng Range Planning with Dr. Rodney 
G. Hurley, the former College dean of 
educational research, planning and 
evaluation, who left the College last 
month to assume a position at 
Hillsborough Community College in 
Tampa, Fla. 

The three were to explain the Col- 
lege's Long Range Plan for 1984-89 in 
which Dr. Doyle chaired the steering 
committee and Dr. Hurley played a key 
role. 

According to Dr. Doyle, the three 
explained how to deal with college 
philosophy and mission statements, 
goals, objectives, and action plans, to 
about SO members of the national 
organization. 

Grad committee 
seeks student input 

College commencement committee 
meetings will begin later this month and 
the committee is looking for student in- 
volvement, according to Lawrence W, 
Emery, director of counseling, career 
development, and placement. 

In previous years, the president of 
the Student Government Association 
has participated on the committee. 

Emery, coordinator of the Satur- 
day, May 11 commencement, noted that 
meetings will be held once every three 
weeks and also noted major structural 
change in graduation ceremonies. 

He stated that now with permanent 
bleachers being installed at the east end 
of the Gymnasium, where graduation is 
held, changes will have to be made to 
accommodate the sound system. 

Emery also commented that the 
search continues for a commencement 
speaker, and Dr. Robert L. Breuder, 
College president, has sent a request to 
Lee lacocca, chairman of the Chrysler 
Corporation, to speak, but he has not 
heard a reply. 

Other members of the commence- 
ment committee are William C. Brad- 
shaw, director of experiental learning; 
Dean R. Foster, director of develop- 
ment studies; Donald 0. Young Sr., 
project coordinator/expediter; and 
Barbara A. Martin-Johnson, director of 
communications. 

Those students wishing to par- 
ticipate on the committee may contact 
Emery in the Counseling, Career 
Development and Placement Office, 
Room 157, Learning Resources Center, 
or by calling College Ext. 246. 

About 600 students were named to 
the College's Dean's List last spring for 
Fall 1983. 



Also discussed were MBO's, 
management-by-objective, a listing and 
description of future goals to be com- 
pleted by a certain deadline, which the 
College sets for administrators and 
deans. 

They also distributed the College's 
Assessment Report, an overview of the 
state of the College in 1984, and the 
Fact Book, which focuses on data such 
as enrollment and the budget. 

Dr. Doyle detailed that (he current 
trend in community college planning is 
by five-year intervals, versus the former 
ten-year planning approach. He at- 
tributes this change to the escalating 
rate of changes in higher education, and 
noted that colleges really need updates 
every year. 

The three have attended former 
workshops on the subject, and plan to 
participate in a regional workshop in 
Boston in late summer, and one in 
Denver in October. 

The ACCT covered the expenses of 
the trip. 




"KILLING TIME" between 
classes is James E. 
Mothersbaugh, a broadcasting 



student of Muncy, scanning his 
American Government lexlbook. 
Photo by Richard E. Kopp Jr. 



Italian trip reservation deadline near 



A little more than a week is left to 
reserve a place for the "Springtime in 
Italy" excursion from May 12 to 25. 

James E. Logue, associate pro- 
fessor of English, is coordinating the 
space reservations and will act as tour 



Blood tests to be offered next month 
in conjunction with Health Week 

In conjuncUon with College Health Week, Monday, Feb. II to Friday, Feb. 
15, a fasting blood test for sugar and cholesterol levels is being offered on campus, 
according to Mrs. Janet R. Querimit, College nurse. 

Cost of the test will be $6.50 per person. 

While the sugar test detects early diabetes, the cholesterol test derermines the 
risk of coronary artery disease. 

If either of the tests is abnormal, referral to a physician can be recommended, 
according to Mrs. Ouerimit. 



guide. 

The $1,929 trip includes a package 
of round-trip airfare, first<lass hotel ac- 
commodations 

dmners, three wme tastings at local 
vineyards, motorcoach, escorts, local 
guides, and half-day tours of Rome, 
Perugia, Florence, Ravenna, Venice, 
Milan, and one day trips to Pisa and 
San Gimignano. 

Also included is a three night stay 
in Rome, a night in Torgiano, four in 
Florence, one in Ravenna, two in 
Venice, and one in Milan. 

The trip is limited to 25 people and 
Logue stated that four people have sign- 
ed up so far. 

Deadline to reserve a space is next 
Thursday, Jan. 31. To reserve, a $200 
deposit must be made to Thomson 



Anyone interested in having the test done may call Mrs. Querimit at College Brl ^i" P'.^'^!? *•"" ^^^ '" ^°°'" 



Ext. 244, to make arrangements 

Petition process continues ^ 

Petitioning for May 1985 gradua- 
tion began last week and will continue 
through Friday, Feb. 15, according to 
Miss Connie R. Kelsey, assistant 
registrar. 

Students who are eligible to 
graduate should complete a petition to 
graduate form and process through the 
Student Records Office, she added. 

The fee for petitioning is $5, rising 
to $10 after the Feb. 15 deadline. 

The assistant registrar also noted 
that the official period for adding class- 
es this semester is over, but the dropp- 
ing classes process may be done through 
this Friday, Jan. 25, without an instruc- 
tor's signature or a withdrawing grade. 

The adviser's signature is required 
on the forms, it was noted. 

Miss Kelsey reminded students they 
must initiate a drop if they have 
previously scheduled for a class which 
they advance-placed out of, or if they 
have stopped attending. 

Without officially dropping a class, 
students are subject to withdrawing 
failure (WF) grades appearing on their 
transcript, she added. 



317, Academic Center. 

For further information, Logue 
may be contacted at College Ext. 403. 



Phi Beta Lambda 
is looking for... 

...new and returning business and 
computer science students who are in- 
terested in being a member of PBL 

All interested students can pick up an 
application in the PBL office located 
in Room 3 (Basement) of the 
Academic Center 



6oSPOTLIGHTDMoiidiy, Jinoiry 21, I9IS 

almost 500 students named 
for Fall 1984 

Provided by College litformation Cffice 

Nearly 500 students enrolled in one of the College's 60 pro- 
grams were named to the Fall 1984 Dean's List, according to 
names released by Dr. James E. Middleton, dean of academic 
qffairs. 

Students must attain a 3.5 cumulative grade point aveage 

to be named for the honor. Students' names, addresses, and 

curriculums are: 



William J. Welker Jr., Towanda RD 1. 
Electronics Technology. 

Paul A. Bennell, Towanda, Air Condilion- 
William A. Pallon, Darlington, Dairy j„g a„|j Refrigeration. 

Paul L. Vanderpool, Towanda RD 4, 
Plumbing and Heating. 

William J. Jennings, Towanda RD 3, 
Machinist General. 

Burton R. Schrader, Towanda RD 2, Elec- 
tronics Technology. 

Kenneth Uniz, Ulster RD I, Carpentry 
and Building Construction Technology. 



BE A VER 



Herd Management 

BEDFORD 



John S. Henry, Bedford RD 4, Electronics 
Technology. 

David G. Henry, Bedford RD 4, Machine 
Tool Technology. 

Jeffrey V. Wenz, Everett RD 1 Electrical 
Technology. 



BERKS 



Jeffrey R. Hummel. Wemersville, Machine 
Tool Technology. 

David B. Pannabecker, Wemersville RD I, 
Diesel Mechanics. 



BUCKS 



Harry R. Vincelli, Levittown, Aviation 
Maintenance Technician. 



BUTLER 



Louis A. Gagliardi, Herman, Service and 



Rick R. Rice, KuUlown RD 2, Machine Operation of Heavy Construction Equipment. 
Tool Technology. 



BLAIR 



CAMBRIA 



Robert L. Luciano, Altoona, Auto Body 
U jjj Robert Natarian, Bamesboro, Service and 

Harry B. Kipp, Altoona, Air Conditioning Operation of Heavy Construction Equipment, 
and Refrigeration. Thomas R. Behe, Carrolltown RD, Elec- 

Daniel W. Coldwell, Altoona. Electrical "i"! Occupations. 
Occupations. William A. Balicki. Johnstown, Mactimist 

Daniel C. Zeth, Altoona, Electical Occupa- General. 
y„„j Jeffrey T. Wiegman, Johnstown, Conslruc- 

Robert A. Davis, Altoona, Aulo Body tion Carpentry 
Repair, 



David B. Emerick, Altoona. Electrical Oc- 
cupations. 

Craig D. Meadows, Hollidaysburg, Ar- 
chitectural Technology. 

Brian D. Lamborn, Martinsburg RD I, 
Electronics Technology. 

Stephen D. Hinish. Martinsburg, Construc- 
tion Carpentry. 

Robert H. Fleegle, Martinsburg RD 1, 
Welding. 



Francis M. Pentrack, Johnstown, Electrical 
Occupations. 

Joseph B. Hrivnak, Johnstown, Construc- 
tion Carpentry. 

David M. Thrower, Dunlo, Diesel 
Mechanics. 

Kevin F. Rosensteel, Ebensburg, Construc- 
tion Carpentry. 

Robert P. Leary, Ebensburg, Construction 
Carpentry. 

David J. Radyk, Mineral Point RD 2, 



Construction Carpentry. 

BRADFORD 



Brenda S. Decker. Columbia Cross Roads 
RD 2, Secretarial Science. 

Ray E. Eilfert. GillcH RD 1, Electrical Oc- 
cupations. 

Mary L. Castle, Canton RD 2, Word Pro- 
cessing. 

Tammy K. Wilcox, Canton RD 1, Word 
Processing. 



CARBON 



John W. Fischer, Palmerton, Construction 
Carpentry. 

Luke C. Hiitiier, Palmerton RD 1, 
Machinist General. 

Karl J. Bednar, Lehighton RD 2, Machine 
Tool Technology. 

Rodney L. Steigerwalt, Lehighton RD 7, 
Machinist General. 

Nicholas A. Holmes, Summit Hill. Com- 
puter Information Systems. 



CENTRE 



Richard D. Woodring. Stale College, Food 
and Hospitality Management. 

Ronald D. Mesavage, State College, Elec- 
trical Occupations. 

Mark E. Fultz. Bellefonte RD 2, Architec- 
tural Technology. 

Christopher R. Larimer, Pleasant Gap, 
Computer Information Systems. 

Kenneth R. Weaver, Bellefonte RD 1, 
Machine Tool Technology. 

Scott D. Sommers, Boalsburg, Machninist 
General. 

Wendy S. Fahl, Howard RD 1, Dental 
Hygiene. 

Michael B. Confer, Howard RD 1, Auto 
Body Repair. 

Darryl R. Wenrick, Howard RD 1, 
Machine Tool Technology. 

David L. Simcox. Philipsburg. Tool Design 
Technology. 

John S. Shook. Spring Mills. Machine Tool 
Technology. 



CLARION 



Brtjce E. McEntire, Clarion RD 1, Air 
Conditioning and Refrigeration. 

Michael R. McCleaiy, Knox. Machine 
Tool Technology. 



Gary L. Myers, Tyrone, Construction Diesel Mechanics. 
Carpentry. Robert J. Grecek, Portage, Machinist 

Vincent J. Liebal, Williamsburg RD 1. General. 

Raymond C. Earnest. Ashville RD 1, 
Welding. 

Raymond P. Shingle, Chest Springs, Ser- 



CLEARFIELD 



Robert A. Oarvey, Osceola Mills RD 1, 
Service and Operation of Heavy Constmction 
Equipment. 

Kevin E. Rollin, Clearfield, Machine Tool 
Technology. 

Harry S. Holland, Curwensville RD 1, 
Nursery Management. 

Rodney A. Eisenhower, Cutwensville, 
Business Management. 

Edward G. Brown, Orassnat, Computer 
Information Systems. 

Dennis A. Luzier, Karthaus. Engineering 
Drafting Technology. 

Joseph R. Rolley, Karthaus, Electronics 
Technology. 

Christine A. Watson, Morrisdale RD 2, 
Computer Operator. 

CLINTON 



vice and Operation of Heavy Construction 
Equipment. 

John M. Kennedy, Ctesson, Plumbing and 
Heating. 

Mark G. McCulley, Hastings RD I. 
Welding. 

Richard W. Finet, Hastings, Machinist 
General. 

John A. Crowell, Patton, Construction 
Carpentry. 



Daria J. Beahm, Beech Creek RD I, Ac- 
counting. 

Katiierine M. Shoemaker, Lock Haven RD 
1, Practical Nursing. 

Debra J. Gramley, Lock Haven, Practical 
Nursing. 

Randy L. Marks, Avis, Machinist General. 

Wesley R. Carson, Avis, Engineering Draf- 
ting Technology. 

Sherri Hoffman, Avis, Computer Informa- 
tion Systems. 

Angela Y. Maurer, Avis, Practical Nurs- 
ing. 



Donald J. Raab, Caslanea, Outdoor Power 
Equipment. 

Jeffrey D. Lucas, Castanea. Business 
Management. 

Todd F. Walker, Lock Haven Electronics 
Technology. 

David E. Grimm, Remington, Accounting. 

Terry R. Bauman. Lock Haven RD 1, Con- 
struction Carpentry. 

Linda K. Hardy, Uck Haven RD 1. Ac- 
counting. 

James L. Gorham. Lock Haven RD I. 
Construction Carpentry. 

Susan G. Kohen. Lock Haven. Word Pro- 
cessing. 

Donald W. Eyer, Lock Haven Rd 1. Com- 
puter Infonnation Systems. 

Gayla J. Ziegler. Lock Haven. Human Ser- 

Gerard L. Banfill. Lock Haven. Quantity 
Food Production and Service. 

Brian P. Semder, Lock Haven. Diesel 
Mechanics. 

Sharon A. Doebler. Lock Haven, Human 
Services. 

Debra L. Tressler. Lock Haven, Accoun- 
ting. 

Kenneth L. Miller, Lock Haven, Constmc- 
tion Carpentry. 

Carol L. Nevel, Lock Haven, Practical 
Nursing. 

Cherie A. Muthler, Loganton RD I, Ac- 
counting. 

Tanya J. Boone, Loganton RD 1, Retail 
Management. 

Alan M. Geyer, Loganton, Auto Body 
Repair. 

Venion K. Harbach. Loganton RD 1, 
Machinist General. 

Michael K. Hills, Mackeyville, Computer 
Information Systems. 

Todd R. Moore, Mill Hall RD 3, Advertis- 
ing Art. 

Scon M.Bitner, Mill Hall RD I, Business 
Management. 

Becky S. Bechdel, MiU Hall RD 2, Word 
Processing. 

. Timothy R. Fenton, Mill Hall, Construc- 
tion Carpentry. 

Frank Cnise, Mill Hall, Electronics 
Technology. 

William L. Probst, Jr., North Bend, 
Carpentry and Building Construction 
Technology. 

Keith M. Shearer, Renovo, Automotive 
Mechanics. 

Mark E. Schnars, Renovo, Construction 
CarfKntry. 

LynnM. Lundy . Renovo, Dietetic Techni- 



COLUMBIA 



James A. Zimmerman, Benton, 
Agribusiness. 

Linda L. Boyer, Bloomsburg RD S, 
Nursery Management. 

Sandra F. Hess, Bloomsburg RD 9, 
Floriculture. 

Branson H. Jones, Bloomsburg, Aulo 
Body Repair. 

Kim M. Welliver, Bloomsburg RD 9, Civil 
Engineering Technology. 

WilUam C. Upton, Computer Information 
Systems. 

TimoUiy L. Hock, MillviUe RD 2, General 
Services. 

Tom L. Haley, Millville, Nursey Manage- 
ment. 

Jack P. Mrock, Millville, Service and 
Operation of Heavy Construction Equipment. 



Arnold J. Avery, Orangeville RD 1. 
Machinist General. 

Michael A. Harmon, Berwick RD 4, Elec- 
trical Technology. 

CUMBERLAND 

Matthew E. FolU, Camp Hill. Electrica, 
Technology. 

Warren Hardman, Mechanicsburg, 
Floriculture. 

Jeffrey W. Warrick, Mechanicsburg, 
Machine Tool Technology. 

Gary J. Hoke, Mechanicsburg, Machine 
Tool Technology. 

Thayne C. Maurer, Shippensburg, Carpen- 
try and Building Construction Technology. 



DAUPHIN 



Ton 1 1. Chau, Halifax, Machine Tool 
Technology. 

Frank A. Lesher, Hummelstown, Machine 
Tool Technology. 

Robert J. Early, Hummelstown Rd 3, 
Machine Tool Technology. 

Scot P. Schaefter, Lykens, Machinist 
General. 

Scott G. Kline, Middletown, Air Condi- 
tioning and Refrigeration. 

Dean A. Witmer, Harrisburg, Aviation 
Maintenance Technician. 



HUNTINGDON 



Sean J. Heaton, Huntingdon, Construction 
Carpentry. 

Larry L. Greene, Huntingdon, Carpentry 
and Building Construction Technology. 

Brock A. Newman, Mapleton Depot RD, 
Carpentry and Building Construction 
Technology. 

Kurt P. Lantz, Mt. Union RD 2. Air Con- 
ditioning and Refrigeration. 

Michael L. Pollicino, Mount Union, 
Automotive Mechanics. 

Curtis H. Shaw, Blairs Mills, ElecUical Oc- 
cupations. 



INDIANA 



Stephen P. Churchill, Indiana RD 5, Elec- 
trical Occupations. 

Barbara K. Miller, Blairsville, Food and 
Hospitality Management. 

Robert B. Yingling, Cherry Tree RD 1, 
Construction Technology. 



DELAWARE 



Jack G. Schultz, Havertown, Nursery 
Management. 

ELK 

Scott A. Deasey, Brockport RD 1, Elec- 
trical Technology. 

Ronald M. Steudler, Johnsonburg, Elec- 
trical Technology. 

Philip T. Parks, Ridgway, Welding. 

Daniel 0. Aiello, Ridgway, Machine Tool 
Technology. 

Ronnie J. Steele, St. Marys, Electrical Oc- 
cupations. 

Bryan J. Valentine, St. Marys, Electrical 
Occupations. 

David H. Green, St. Marys, Carpentry and 
Building Construction Technology. 

Ronald Gleixner, St. Marys, Machine Tool 
Technology. 

Paul J. Hanna II, St. MaryS; Machine 
Tool Technology. 

Howard W. Gradl Jr., St. Marys, Elec- 
trical Occupations. 

John H. Pavlock, Wilcox, General Studies. 

WUham J. Sabatose, Brockport, Electrical 
Occupations. 

ERIE 



Harry A. Jones, Girard, Nursery Manage- 
ment. 

Matthew D. Brewster, West Springfield RD 
1, Diesel Mechanics. 

FULTON 



Gregory A, Deike, Crystal Spring, Con- 
struction Carpentry. 

Eric B. Deike, Crystal Spring, Construc- 
tion Carpentry. 

Todd W. Grissinger, Hustontown, 
Machine Tool Technology. 

Derek J. Hendershot, Warfordsburg, 
Machine Tool Technology. 



JEFFERSON 



Scott A. Reed, Brockway, Electrical 
Technology. 

Donald L. English, Brookville, Carpentry 
Construction. 

Michael Mennitti, Reynoldsville, Machinist 
General. 

George M. Gilga Jr., Sykesville, Machinist 
General. 

Jeffrey P. Haag, Sykesville, Machinist 
General. 



LEHIGH 



Scott R. Mondschein, Coplay, Electrical 
Occupations. 

Thomas F. Hourt. Coplay RD 2, Machine 
Tool Technology. 

Mark M. Genetii, New Tripoli RD 2, 
Machinist General. 

Timothy J. Smoyer. Oreneld Rd 1, 
Machine Tool Technology. 

Charles S. Hemmis, Orefield, Machinist 
General. 

Edmund V. Continenza, Allentown, 
General Studies. 



LUZERNE 



Michael W. Oliver, Dallas RD 2, Service 
and Operation of Heavy Construction Equip- 
ment. 

Scott P. Swan, Dallas RD 4, Auto Body 
Repair. 

Eric A. Cornell, Hunlock Creek RD I, 
Construction Carpentry. 

Scott R. Oakley, Lehman, Construction 
Carpentry. 

John A. Robbins, Nescopeck, Machine 
Tool Technology. 

Michael A. Wright, Shickshinny RD 3, 
Broadcasting. 

Thomas W. Judge, Sweet Valley RD 1, 
Diesel Mechanics. 

Brian B. Heapps, Mountain Top, 
Automotive Technology. 

Edward A. Moore, Shavertown, Auto 
Body Repair. 



JUNIATA 



Brian W. Booher, Mifllintown RD 2, Elec- 
tronics Technology. 

Angela D. Renninger, Mifllintown, Retail 
Management. 

Dwayne E. Wagner, Mifllintown RD 2, Air 
Conditioning and Refrigeration. 

Keith Noss, Port Royal RD I, Machine 
Tool Technology. 

Andrew C. Snyder, Richfield, Diesel 
Mechanics. 

LACKAWANNA 



Michael J. Moflitt. Carbondale, Electrical 
Technology. 

Thomas P. Baigis, Jermyn RD 1, Welding. 

David E. Hudak, Blakely, Electrical Oc- 
cupations. 



LANCASTER 



Jan C. Long, LiUtz, Electrical Occupa- 
tions. 

Theodore L. Burkhart, Talmane, Carpen- 
try and Building Construction Technology. 

John R. Sload, Lancaster, Machine Tool 
Technology. 

Ernest V. Zagars, Lancaster, Auto Body 
Repair. 

LEBANON 



James D. Cramer, Cleona, Automotive 
Mechanics. 

David B. Kase, Palmyra, Aviation 
Maintenance Technician. 

rhomas M. O'Shea, Palmyra, Plumbing 
and Heating. 

Jonathan M. Zinn, Richland RD 1, Con- 
struction Carpentry. 



LYCOMING 



Kathleen E. Kielwein, Williamsport, 
Business Management. 

Lonaine J. Shaheen, Williamsport, Com- 
puter Operator. 

Martin D. Brule, Williamsport, Machinist 
General. 

Monica J. Konyar, Williamsport, Com- 
puter Information Systems. 

Deborah A. Magargle, Williamsport, 
Secretarial Science. 

Michael P. Behney, WilUamsport, Elec- 
trical Occupations. 

Eugene H. Parmeler, Williamsport, Service 
and Operation of Heavy Construction Equip- 
ment. 

Donna T. Brown, Williamsport, Computer 
Operator. 

Regina M. Krumenaker, Williamsport, 
Food and Hospitality Management. 

Debra R. Kem, Williamsport RD 5, Ac- 
counting. 

Lewis E. Maroni, Williamsport, Welding. 

Connie D. Boyce, Williamsport, Computer 
Information Systems. 

Daniel F. Zeiglet, Wilhamsport, Air Con- 
ditioning and Refrigeration. 

Scott A. Baney, WilUamsport, Construc- 
tion Carpentry. 

Sherri A. Creveling, South Williamsport, 
Word Processing. 

Clifford C. Hiller, Williamsport, Elec- 
tronices Technology. 

Lauri L. Cero, WilUamsport, Accounting. 

Richard D. Bubb, Williamsport, Computer 
Information Systems. 

Mark F. Bennardi, Williamsport RD 3, 
Construction Carpentry. 

Craig L. Hower, WUIiamsport, Broad- 
casting. 

Michael J. Massaro, Williamsport, Com- 
puter Information Systems. * 

Aldene T. Messner, Williamsport. Accoun- 
ting. 



SPOTLIGHTDMoiday, Jinoir; 21 IMSQ? 

Karen R. Hewitt, Williamsport, 
Floriculture. 

Richard E. Kopp Jr., Soutii Williamsport, 
Journalism. 

Paula J. Lupoid, Williamsport, 
Unclassified. 

Anthony C. Miosi, Williamsport, Com- 
puter InfonnaUon Systems. 

Crystal A. Childs, Williamsport, 
Floriculture. 

John J. Rider, Williamsport, Electronics 
Technology. 

Sally L. Manning, South WiUiamsport, 
Computer Infonnation Systems. 

Donald L. Reynolds, Williamsport, 
Carpentry and Building Construction 
Technology. 

David A. Badger, South WiUiamsport, 
Computer Information Systems. 

Francis J. Bennett, Duboistown, 
Automotive Technology. 

Drew C. Ertel, South WiUiamsport, 
General Studies. 

Patricia A. Koehler, South WiUiamsport, 
Dietetic Technician. 

Karen L. Preamble, South Williamsport, 
General Studies. 

Gregory S. Snell, Williamsport, Auto Body 
Repair. 

Mark L. Kauffman, Williamsport RD 4, 
Machine Tool Technology. 

Leon G. Lewis, WUIiamsport, Air Condi- 
tioning and Refrigeration. 

Michael E. Greenway, WUIiamsport, 
Machine Tool Technology. 

David P. Schneider, Williamsport, 
Machinist General. 

Jonatiian F. Miller, Williamsport RD 3, 
Computer Infonnation Systems. 

Greg S. Applestein, WiUiamsport, General 
Studies. 

Tammy M. Netterblade, Williamsport, 
Computer Information Systems. 

Richard J. Sholder, WUIiamsport, Com- 
puter Information Systems. 

Amy R. Lamade, WUIiamsport, Food and 
Hospitality Management. 

Steve W. BaU, WUIiamsport, Automotive 
Mechanics. 

James L. Benson, SouUi WiUiamsport, 
Diesel Mechanics. 

WilUam J. Hertzog, WUUamsport, Elec- 
tionics Technology. 

Scott E. Carr, WiUiamsport, Air Condi- 
tioning and Refrigeration. 

Robert N. Glossner, Williamsport, 
Radiologic Technology. 

Suzann L. Bennett, Duboistown, Food and 
HospitaUty Management. 

Jane L. Fouike, Williamsport, Human Ser- 
vices. 

Edythe P. Bohart, WUIiamsport, Dietetic 
Technician. 

Betii A. SuUivan, WiUiamsport, Computer 
Information Systems. 

John E. Crouse, Williamsport RD 3, 
Machine Tool Technology. 

Gregory Kocher, WiUiamsport, Individual 
Studies. 

Mary A. Petros, Williamsport, Business 
Management. 

Dixie G. Laudenslager, Williamsport, 
Dietetic Technician. 

James L. Morris, Williamsport, Electrical 
Technology. 

Ellen K. Reeder. Williamsport RD 2. 
Dietetic Technician. 

Patrick M. Banlett, WilUamsport, Con- 
struction Carpentry. 

Lisa R. WiUiams, WilUamsport, Secretarial 
Science. 

Jeffrey K. Bedford, WiUiamsport, Com- 
puter Information Systems. 

■■■ Please lurn lo Page 8 



SaSPOTUGHTnMonli;, JiHujr 21, IMS 



Lycoming County continued 
from page 7 

Vincent R. Fagnano, WillJanispon, Air 
Conditioning and Refrigeration. 

Lori A. Allen, Williamsport, Human Ser- 
vices. 

Gerald E. Haas. Williamspon RD 3. Com- 
puter Information Systems. 

Thomas J. VanSant Jr., South 
Williamsport, Electronics Technology. 

Rose-Marie A. Ziegmann, South 
Williamsport, General Studies. 

Wendy E. Confer, Williamspon, General 
Studies. 

Janice A. Lowry, Williamsport, Word Pro- 
cessing. 

Rick E. Poliska, Williamsport, Electronics 
Technology. 

Gordon W. Gamble, Williamsport, Elec- 
tronics Technology. 

Beth L. Moore, Williamsport, Nursery 
Management. 

Melissa J. Phillips, Williamsport, Word 
Processing. 

Kevin C. Kessler, Williamsport, Eectronics 
Technology. 

Max R. Houseknecht, Williamsport, 
Carpentry and Building Construction 
Technology. 

Teresa A. Way, South Williamsport, Com- 
putet Information Systems. 

Troy M. Andersen, Williamsport, In- 
dividual Studies. 

Russell N. Foust, South Williamspon, 
Computet Infonnation Systems. 

Steven B. Perry, Williamsport, Human 
Services. 

Patricia A. Fenderson, Williamspon, 
Surgical Technology. 

Cynthia M. Perry, Williamsport, Broad- 
casting. 

Danny L. Haner, Williamsport, Air Condi- 
tioning and Refrigeration. 

Jean M. Warner, Williamspon, Dietetic 
Technician. 

Gregory A. Young, Williamsport, Elec- 
trical Technology. 

Kathleen S. Reyes, Williamspon, Nursery 
Management. 

Lynne M. Fox, South Williamsport, Word 
Processing. 

Charies W. Walker, South Williamsport, 
Auto Body Repair. 

Anne Krosnicki, South Williamspon, 
Dietetic Technician. 

Vicki A. Knecht, Williamsport, Computer 
Information Systems. 

Maty I. Malloy, Williamsport, Individual 
Studies. 

Michael C. Grieco, Williamsport RD I, 
General Studies. 

Timothy S. Sleek, Williamsport, Business 
Management. 

Joanne K. Lego, Williamsport, General 
Studies. 

William A. Keen, Williamsport, Individual 
Studies. 

Patricia A. Little, Williamsport Rd 5, 
Computer Infonnation Systems. 

Bret F. Myers, South Williamsport, 
General Studies. 

Geno F. Bragalone, Williamsport, Air 
Conditioning and Refrigeration. 

Audrey S. Indelicarto, Williamsport RD 3, 
Accounting. 

Betsy D. Follmer, South Williamsport. 
Computer Operator. 

Stephen J. Wenner. Williamsport RD 3. 
Electronics Technology. 

Willard J. Ramph Jr., Williamspon. 
Mechanical Drafting. 



Kiireo L. Murphy, Williamspon RD 4, 
Computer Information Systems. 

Daniel A. Radke, Williamsport RD I, 
General Studies. 

Suzanne K. Sitler, Williamspon RD 4, 
Word Processing. 

Constance M. Vitolins, Williamsport, 
Computer Information Systems. 

Andrea K. Bennett, Williamsport, Food 
and HospitaUty Management. 

William E. Riggs Jr., Williamsport, Elec- 
tronics Technology. 

Jennifer L. Hammond, Williamsport Rd 4, 
General Studies. 

Kathleen E. Martin, Williamsport, Dental 
Hygiene. 

Randy B. Metzget, Williamsport. Plumb- 
ing and Healing. 

Susan L. Poust. South Williamsport. Word 
Processing. 

Robin L. Maggs. Williamsport. General 
Studies. 

Patricia A. Durand, Williamsport. Dental 
Hygiene. 

Sharon C. Fegan. Williamspon Rd I. 
Engineering Drafting Technology. 

Carol A. Prater. Williamsport. Dental 
Hygiene. 

Robert V. Wasaff. Williamsport. Com- 
puter Information Systems. 

Lorna L. Petersen. South Williamsport. 
General Studies. 

Sharon K. Quinn, WilUamsport, Practical 
Nursing. 

Joanne Stevens, Williamsport, Practical 
Nursing. 

Brion M. Watson, Antes Fort, Accounting. 
Patricia B. Hinshaw, Cogan Station, In- 
dividual Studies. 

Donald W, Cohick, Cogan Sution RD 3, 
Tood Design Technology. 

Meny K. Hurst, Cogan SUtion RD 1, 
Advertising Art. 

Charles D. Dangle, Cogan Sution RD I, 
Welding. 

Holly Jo Rook, Cogan Station RD 3, 
Secretarial Science. 

Maureen R. Baumgartner, Cogan Station 
RD 3, General Studies. 

Sherry L. Rhone. Cogan Station RD I. 
Business Management. 

Thomas 0. Brickell, Cogan Station RD 3, 
Cooslnictiott Carpentry. 

Dennis G. Kriner, Cogan Station Rd I, 
Electrical Occupations. 

Scott D. Kriner, Cogan Station RD 3, Elec- 
tronics Technology. 

Donald Bronson, Hughesville RD 1, Air 
Conditioning and Refrigerations. 

Kelley L. Morgan, Hughesville, Computer 
Operator. 

David S. Craft, Hughesville RD I, Con- 
struction Carpentry. 

Mary C. Reiner, Hughesville, Engineering 
Drafting Technology. 

Mark E. Maroney, Hughesville, Electrical 
Technology. 

Julie D. Gray, Hughesville, Floriculture. 
Anthony D. Villella. Hughesville RD 2. Air 
Conditioning and Refrigeration. 

Sheila D. Pillot. Hughesville RD 1. 
General Studies. 

Thomas L. Miller. Hughesville. El«trical 
Occupations. 

Timothy S. Fenstaraacher. Hughesville RD 
1. Forest Technology. 

Mary L. Koch. Hughesville RD 2. Dietetic 
Technician. 

Ramona G. Bigger, Hughesville, General 
Studies. 

Cindy L. Wanier, Jersey Mills, Technical 
Illustration. 

Stephen R. Ross, Jersey Shore RD 3, 
Forest Technology. 



Jeffrey R. Bardo, Jersey Shore RD 3, 
Business Management. 

Gerald S. Koch, Jersey Shore RD 3, 
Engineering Drafting Technology. 

Leshe K. McConnell, Jersey Shore, 
Business Management. 

Curtis S. Woodhouse, Jersey Shore RD I, 
Computer Information Systems. 

Robert J. Kamus, Jersey Shore RD 2, Con- 
struction Carpentry. 

Donna R. Naugle, Jersey Shore RD 2, Ac- 
counting. 

Vincent M. Stone, Jersey Shore RD 3, 
Computer Information Systems. 

Gail M. Welsh, Jersey Shore, Accounting. 
Amelia C. Schwanke, Jersey Shore RD 2, 
Accounting. 

Michael J. Nau. Jersey Shore RD 2. 
Welding. 

Christine I. Fink. Jersey Shore. Practical 
Nursing. 

Linda A. Tawney. Linden RD I , Computer 
Information Systems. 

Brad A. Starr. Linden RD I. Electronics 
Technology. 

Robert A. Worth. Linden RD 1. 
Automotive Mechanics. 

Wayne M. Rickards. Montgomery. Service 
and Operation of Heavy Construction Equip- 
ment. 

Steven G. Gross. Montgomery, Service and 
Operation of Heavy Construction Equipment. 
David C. Wilkins, Montgomery. Computer 
Information Systems. 

Beth A. Grittner. Montgomery. Accoun- 
ting. 

Donna J. Finck. Montgomery RD 2, 
General Studies. 

Randy J. Vermeulen. Montgomery RD 1. 
Electrical Technology. 

Lance D. Converse, Montoursville RD I, 
Machine Tool Technology. 

Howard J. Kling, Montoursville, Electrical 
Technology. 

Diane L. Lamade, Montoursville RD 2, 
Computer Infonnation Systems. 

Merriann K. Way, Montoursville RD 1. 
Word Processing. 

Michael S. Ellis, Montoursville, General 
Studies. 

Samuel D. Thomas, Montoursville RD 3, 
Business Management. 

Robert J. Gehr, Montoursville, Architec- 
tural Technology. 

Rebecca A. Gardner, Montoursville 
Nursery Management. 

Kelly L. Calehuff, Montoursville, General 
Studies. 

Jeanetta A. Garvey, Montoursville RD 2, 
Floriculture. 

Robert A. Bamonte, Montoursville, Con- 
struction Carpentry. 

Cynthia A. West, Montourville RD I, Ac- 
counting. 

Barbara J. Hutchison, Montoursville RD 
2. General Studies. 

Ross 0. Bigelow, Montoursville RD 1. Ar- 
chitectural Technology. 

Richard T. Wolfgang. Montoursville. 
Plumbing and Heating. 

James E. Ayrer. Montoursville RD 4. Elec- 
trical Technology. 

Kurt A. Westbrook, Montoursville, Elec- 
tronics Technology. 

Diane J. Madden, Montoursville, Com- 
puter Information Systems. 

Robert S. Newton, Montoursville, Elec- 
trical Occupations. 

Nancy L. Cole, Montoursville RD 4, Com- 
puter Operator. 

Jody K. Horn, Montoursville RD 4, 
General Studies. 

Kenneth E. Roush, Montoursville RD 2. 
Automotive Technology. 



Sharon A. Souter, Montoursville RD 4, 
Surgical Technology. 

Christia L. Keyle, Montoursville, General 
Studies. 

Christine L. Hemrick, Muncy RD 3, Com- 
puter Information Systems. 

Lindsay K. Wood, Muncy Rd 5, Machinist 
General. 

Claudia N. Parr Coales, Muncy Rd 2, 
Human Services. 

Carios J. Mendoza, Muncy Rd I, Com- 
puter Information Systems. 

Beverly A. Derrick, Muncy Rd 4, General 
Studies. 

Diane L. Winter, Muncy RD 4, Computer 
Information Systems. 

Gregory K. Niklaus, Muncy RD 2, Elec- 
tronics Technology. 

James H. Farrow, Trout Run, Air Condi- 
tioning and Refrigeration. 

Karen S. Ludwig, Trout Run, Broad- 
casting. 

Tracy Ludwig, Trout Run, General 
Studies. 

Robert E. Fontaine, Trout Run, Plumbing 
and Heating. 

Cari D. Ward, Williamsport, Constniction 
Carpentry. 

LeAnn M. Livennore, Trout Run RD I, 
Word Processing. 

Charles C. Bigler, Trout Run, Welding. 

Margery L. Waugh, Trout Run, Human 
Services. 

MERCER 

Stephen T. Collenette, Stoneboro, Con- 
struction Carpentry. 

MCKEAN 

Matthew R. Allen, Bradford, Diesel 
Mechanics. 

John H. Welch, Eldred, Electrical Occupa- 
tions. 

Craig S. Bunker, Kane, Plumbing and 
Heating. 

Michael E. Park, Kane, Electrical Occupa- 
tions. 

Robert J. Ostrom, Port Allegheny, Carpen- 
try and Building Conslnjction Technology. 

Scou J. Lowery, Port Allegheny, Machine 
Tool Technology. 

MIFFLIN 



Todd R. Yoder, Belleville, Electrical 
Technology. 

Jeffrey L. McKinley, Bumham, Architec- 
tural Technology. 

John R. Besch Jr., Granville RD I, 
Carpentry and Building Construction 
Technology. 

Douglas R. Henry, Lewistown RD 2, Ar- 
chitectural Technology. 

Calvin R. Bargo, Lewistown RD 3, Elec- 
tronics Technology. 



MONROE 



Chadd B. Gray, Cresco RD 2, Electrical 
Occupations. 

John M. Bartnick, Effort, Automotive 
Technology. 

MONTGOMERY 



Robert W. Anderson, Audubon. Constnic- 
tion Carpentry.' 

Kurt F. Painter. Pottstown, Constniction 
Carpentry. 

Please turn lo Page 9 



continued from page 8 
MONTOUR 

Stephen D. Welch, Danville, Automolive 
Mechanics. 

Scott E. Mensch, Danville, Carpentry and 
Building Construction Technology. 

Howard L. Reasner, Danville RD 8, 
General Studies. 

Robin L. Honaberger, Danville RD 1, 
Diesel Mechanics. 

Mark A. Kocher, Danville, Automotive 
Technology. 

NORTHAMPTON 



Judy A. Heimer, Bath, Accounting. 

Andrew B. Roecker, Bethlehem, Service 
and Operation of Heavy Construction Equip- 
ment. 

Matthew J. Zeleski, Bethlehem, Machine 
Tool Technology. 

Joseph M. Bradford, Easlon, Automotive 
Technology. 

Jesse E. Repash, Hellertown, Service and 
Operation of Heavy Construction Equipment. 

NORTHUMBERLAND 



Steven J. Snyder, Dalmatia RD I, 
Automotive Mechanics. 

Marsha L. Helzendorf, Turbolville, 
Floriculture. 

Susan A. Kifl, Turbotville RD 2, Food and 
Hospitality Management. 

Catherine E. McLaughlin, Watsontown, 
Engineering Drafting Technology. 

Richard F. Wright, Walsonlown, 
Machinist General. 

Don L. Reilmeyer III, Watsontown RD 2, 
Welding. 

Kimberiy A. Stugard, Watsontown RD 2, 
Secretarial Science. 

Steven C. Ellis, Watsontown RD 1. Air 
Conditioning and Refrigeration. 

Greta J. Kling, Watsontown, Business 
Management. 

Shawn E. Gelnett, Watsontown, Business 
Management. 

David L. VanHoute, Watsontown RD 2, 
Auto Body Repair. 

Donna E. Ranck, Watsontown, Practical 
Nursing. 

James B. Stetler, Sunbury RD 3, Elec- 
tronics Technology. 

Steve W. Long, Sunbury RD 3, Diesel 
Mechanics. 

Bradley D. Blaisdell, Sunbury RD 3, Plum- 
bing and Heating. 

Donald H. Stuck. Electronics Technology. 

Donald E. Perry, Sunbury, Machinist 
General. 

Carson A. Riland, Sunbury RD 3, Elec- 
tronics Technology. 

Paul S. Gelnett, Sunbury RD 3, Electronics 
Technology. 

Sandra J. Erdman, Domsife RD 1, Ac- 
counting. 

Linda Heim, Domsife RD I, Practical 
Nursing. 

Sandra L. Langis, Elysburg, Dietetic 
Technician. 

Leon P. Shofller, Elysburg, Electrical 
Technology. 

Melissa A. Ramer, Gowen City, Computer 
Information Systems. 

Joseph A. Winhofer, Kulpmont, Carpentry 
and Building Construction Technology. 

Toni Pettovia, Kulpmont, Accounting. 

Floyd J. Dobson, Kulpmont, Plumbing 
and Heating. 

Kathy J. Ranck, Computer Information 
Systems. 



Michael Wagner, Milton, Electronics 
Technology. 

Amanda J. Brown, Milton RD 3, Word 
Processing. 

Jeffrey J. Firman, Milton. Automotive 
Technology. 

Melvin E. Crist Jr.. Milton. General 
Studies. 

John G. Lamprinos, Milton RD 2, Elec- 
tonics Technology. 

Jon W. Owens, Milton RD 3, Electronics 
Technology. 

Richard M. Bowersox, Milton, Accoun- 
ting. 

Scott D. Geiser, Montandon, Electronics 
'echnology. 

Cheryl A. Jatko. Mount Carrael, Dietetic 
Technician. 

Steven J. Bariol, Mount Carmel, Electrical 
Occupations. 

Allen G. Watts, Northumberiand, Com- 
puter Information Systems. 

Patrick J. Scullin, Northumberiand, Elec- 
trical Occupations. 

Michael J. Classic, Shamokin, Machinist 
General. 

Scott E. Herr, Shamokin, Electrical Oc- 
cupations. 

Kim R. Bordner, Trevorton, Computer In- 
formation Systems. 

Kenneth L. Hall, Washingtonville, Elec- 
tronics Technology. 

William G. Robenolt, West Milton, Com- 
puter Information Systems. 

Gary J. Lentz, Walnutport, Machine Tool 
Technology. 

PERRY 

Donald G. Shaeffer, Newport, Forest 
Technology. 

PIKE 

John Frisbie, Greentown RD 2, 
Automotive Mechanics. 

POTTER 



Gladys E. Hunsinger, Austin RD I, Elec- 
trical Occupations. 

John L. Seifert, Austin RD I, Construction 
Carpentry. 

Lorri A. Jackson, Galeton, Business 
Management. 

Roger S. McCutcheon, North Bingham, 
Electrical Technology. 

Douglas E. Miller, Cross Fork, Electronics 
Technology. 

SCHUYLKILL 

Frank E. Koles, Saint Clair, Plumbing and 
Healing. 

John F. Cooper, Pottsville RD 3, Electrical 
Technology. 

Wayne M. Parfilt,. Pottsville. Auto Body 
Repair. 

John C. Brigade Jr., Pottsville, Electrical 
Occupations. 

Dwayne W. Scheib, Hegins RD I, Elec- 
trical Occupations. 

Nancy A. Shade, Hegins, Agribusiness. 

Kenneth J. Wetzel, Hegins RD 2, 
Machinist General. 

Richard L. Wronski, New Boston, Auto 
Body Repair. 

Joseph Ryan, Minersville, Computer Infor- 
mation Systems. 

John H. Epler, New Ringgold RD 2. Con- 
struction Carpentrv. 

Joseph E. Epler, New Ringgold RD 2, 
Machinist General. 



Rodney 0. Dreisbach, Pine Grove RD 4, '"'"n-'GHTDMo.d.,, a...„ 21, 1M5n9 

Plumbing and Heating. TIOCA 
Kevin D. Forry, Pine Grove RD I, 

Automotive Mechanics. 

Scott L. Deibert. Sacramento, arpentry Robert Bannon, Wellsboro, Electronics 

and Building Construction Technology. Technology. 

Jerry A. Wise, Tower City RD 1, Machine Jolene T. Smith, Wellsboro, Accounting. 

Tool Technology. james P. May, Wellsboro, Air Condition- 
Mark A. Blew, Tuscarora, Machinist ing and Refrigeration. 

^'""»1- Lee H. Chilson, Wellsboro, Construction 

Timothy L. Scheib, Valley View, Engineer- Carpentry. 

ing Drafting Technology 



Robert W. Reed, Valley View, Machine 
Tool Technology. 



SNYDER 



William B. Hawk, Beaver Springs, Nursery 
Management. 

Brian D. Zechman, Beavertown RD 1, 
Electronics Technology. 

Gene A. Kreamer, Civil Engineering 
Technology. 

Lon W. Zeigler, McClure, Aviation 
Technology. 

Donna A. Prince, Middleburg RD 4, Den- 
tal Hygiene. 

Steven M. Boonie, Middleburg, Electronics 
Technology. 

Rudy L. Kratzer, Middleburg, Respiratory 
Therapy Technician. 



Mark A. Umer, Wellsboro, Forest 
Technology. 

Harland E. Warriner. Wellsboro, Plumb- 
ing and Heating. 

David J. Wilston, Wellsboro RD 2, 
Machine Tool Technology. 

Brian C. Dwyer, Wellsboro, Business 
Management. 

Mark A. Boyce, Wellsboro, Computer In- 
formation Systems. 

Debbie A. Harer. Arnot, Business 
Technology. 

Richard R. Priset. Blossburg, Auto Body 
Repair. 

David C. McNett, Blossburg RD 1, Auto 
Body Repair. 

Danny L. Fish, Elkland, Electrical Oc- 
cupations. 

Shiriey M. Hunter, Elkland, Accounting. 

Craig J. Troncone, Lawrenceville RD 1, 



Salvatore J. Randello, Middleburg, Com- Carpentry and Building Construction 



puter Information Systems. 

Joan B. Cover. Mifllinburg, Food and 
Hospitality Management. 

Howard J. Fertig, Mifflinburg RD 3, Elec- 
trical Technology. 

Daphine R. Reed, Mifflinburg RD 2 
Dietetic Technician. 

Lisa G. Eberhart. Mifflinburg RD I, Word 



Michael E. Shaffer. Mifflinburg, Computer 
information Systems. 

Mary A. Sullivan, Mifflinburg RD 2, 
General Studies. 

Lee J. Shaffer, Mount Pleasant Mills RD 1, 
Floriculture. 

Michael T. Berg, Mount Pleasant Mills RD 
1, Aviation Technology. 

Micah P. Mosey, Port Trevonon RD I, 
Machine Tool Technology. 

Ross A. Charles, Port Trevorton, Diesel 
Mechanics. 

Leona G. Ressler, Selinsgrove, Dietetic 
Technician. 

Kenneth A. Swineford, Selinsgrove, Elec- 
trical Occupations. 

Craig S. Lewis, Selinsgrove, Electronics 
Technology. 

Dwight A. Musser, Selinsgrove. Air Condi- 
tioning and Refrigeration. 

Ginger L. Wendt, Selinsgrove, Accounting. 

SOMERSET 

Joseph R. Boland, Central City, Diesel 
Mechanics. 

John L. Hostetler RD I, HoUsopple, Elec- 
trical Occupations. 

John M. Berish, Windber, Service and 
Operation of Heavy Construction Equipment. 



Technology. 

Cheryl A. Kline, Lawrenceville RD 2, 
Computer Information Systems. 

Teresa K. Hackett. Lawrenceville RD 2, 
Practical Nursing. 

Myra K. Sindlinger, Liberty RD 1, 
Business Management. 

CUnton L. Beverly, Mansfleld. Plumbing 
and Heating. 

Daniel D. Clarlc, Man.ilield RD 3, Elec- 
tronics Technology. 

Kevin E. Crumb, Mansfield RD 1, Plumb- 
ing and Heating. 

Lisa K. Pilling, Mansfield RD 2, Computer 
Information Systems. 

Kelly S. Harris, Millerton RD 2, Business 
Management. 

Kelly E. Everett, Millerton RD 1, Com- 
puter Information Systems. 

Sharen L. Lewis, Morris RD I, 
Unclassified. 

Ramona L. Longabaugh, Morris RD I. 
Computer Information Systems. 

John Abel, Tioga, Computer Information 
Systems. 

Kelly L. King, Westfield, Computer Infor- 
mation Systems. 

Kim E. Oulman, Westfield, Secretarial 
Science. 

UNION 



SULLIVAN 



Bonnie Eberiin, Muncy Valley RD I, Prac- 
tical Nursing. 

Susan R. Smith, Forksville RD I. General 
Studies. 

SUSQUEHANNA 

Guy L. Parrish, RD 1, Montrose, Welding. 
Christopher T. Herbert, Susquehanna, 
Plumbing and Heating. 



Nathan E. Fisher Jr., Allenwood RD 1, 
Computer Information Systems. 

Lisa A. Hill, Allenwood RD 1. Accoun- 
ting. 

Gregory E. Planz, Laurelton, Plumbing 
and Heating. 

James T. McShane, Lewisburg, Business 
Management. 

Timothy J. McGovem, Lewisburg, Plumb- 
ing and Heating. 

Richard D. Troutman, Lewisburg, Nursery 
Management. 

Jeffrey D. Stahl, Lewisburg RD 2, Business 
Management. 

Curtis C. Krebs. Lewisburg RD 3, Civil 
Engineering Technology. 

Thomas E. Beck, Lewisburg RD 3. Ac- 
counting. 

please turn lo page 10 



Union County continued 
from page 9 



lOaSPOTLIGHTDMoiidiy, Jinoirj 21, 1985 

Veteran benefit schedules; 
deadline is this Friday 

All veteran students receiving 
educational benefits who have not turn- 
ed in a copy of their schedule to the 
veterans specialist should do so im- 
mediately, according to Mrs. Barbra A. 
Mundorff, veterans affairs specialist. 

According to Mrs. Mundorff, this 
is one of the requirements that must be 
fulfilled in order to continue receiving 
educational benefits. 

The College will assume that any 
student who has not filled out a 
schedule by Friday, Jan. 25 is not 
enrolled. Unless a schedule is on file in 
the Veterans OlTice, Room 201, 
Academic Center, (Financial Aid Of- 
fice), a termination notice will be sent to 
the Veterans Administration Center and 
benefits will be stopped immediately. 



Gregory G. Wagner, Lewisburg RD 2, Ar- 
chitectural Technology. 

Allan J. Weinand. Lewisburg, Air Condi- 
tioning and Refrigeration. 

Tammy L. Hassinger, Millmonl RD I, Ac- 
counting. 

Daneen M. Oidl. New Berlin, Dietetic 
Technician. 

Robert L. Seebold, New Columbia RD I, 
Computer Information Systems. 

Jody R. Johnson, Winfield RD 1, Com- 
puter Information Systems. 

VENANGO 

Douglas E. Hoffman, Franklin RD I, Elec- 
trical Occupations. 

Ronald Lindsey, Franklin, Construction 
Carpentry. 

Stephen S. Leskoskc, Franklin, Computer 
Information Systems. 

Gary L. Monroe Jr., Polk, Electrical Oc- 
cupations. 

WARREN 

David L. Morine, Russell, Electronics 
Technology. 

Michael R. Camahan, Warren, Carpentry 
and Building Conslruclion Technology. 

WAYNE 

James Pillar, Hawley, Automotive 
Mechanics. 

Valerie A. Petroski, Honesdale RD 4, 
Floriculture. 

Kenneth M. Kraus, Milanville, Construc- 
tion Carpentry. 

John H. Vandclinde, Milanville, Construc- 
tion Carpentry. 

WYOMING 



Jay S. Eberiin, Laceyvillc RD I, Auto 
Body Repair. 

Steven B. Kamisiein, Noxen, AuiO Body 
Repair. 

John A. Kobylski, Tunkhannock, 
Agribusiness. 

WESTMORELAND COUNTY 



Richard W. Jackson, New Kensington, 
Machinist General. 

Brian L. McCall, New Kensington. 
Machine Tool Technology. 

Thomas S. Avcrsa, Lx)wcr Burrell, Con- 
struction Carpentry. 

Scotl S. Seitz. Murrysville, Construction 
Carpentry. 

YORK 

Bernard P. Scholl, Brogue RD 1, Machine 
Tool Technology. 

Andrew A. Beating, Hanover RD 2, Tool 
Design Technology. 

Allan D. Brandl, Hanover, Plumbing and 
Heating. 

Thomas J. Leshcr, Red Lion RD 2, 
Machine Tool Technology. 

Leonard G. Haines, Red Lion RD 2, 
Nursery Management. 

Albert P. Ginler, Spring Grove, Carpentry 
and Building Conslruclion Technology. 

Ronald E. Solles, York, Architectural 
Technology. 

Samuel A. Mundis, York, Diesel 
Mechanics. 

Kevin E. Meckley, York, Graphic Arts. 

Vickie L. Householder, York, Nursery 
Management. 



Guest speaker next week 
to focus on gun control 

In conjunction with the College's 
Special Events Committee and the Pen- 
nsylvania Humanities Council, Dr. 
John J. Turner, Jr., a lecturer will be 
here next Tuesday, Jan. 29 in the 
Academic Center Auditorium at 8 p.m. 

He will talk about the Second 
Amendment and gun control. The pro- 
gram is free to all, however, groups who 



Free validation 
set to end tonight 

Today is the last day for processing 
ID'S during the hours of 7:30 a.m. -8 
p.m. After 8 p.m. there will be a SIO fee 
to have the ID processed. 

Photo id's will only be processed 
on Mondays from 10 a.m. -I p.m. and 
5-7 p.m., or by special appointment, ac- 
cording to Mrs. JoAnn R. Fremiotti, 
coordinator of intramural athletics and 
College activities. For further informa- 
tion call College Ext. 412 (Recreation 
Center). 

The ID validation and processing went 
smoothly this past week because of the 
addition of another personal computer, 
Mrs. Fremiotti noted. 

City hospital offers 
child car seat rentals 

The Williamsport Hospital is offer- 
ing vehicle safety seats for rent as a 
result of the Jan. 1 enactment of the 
Pennsylvania Child Passenger Protec- 
tion Act. 

According to a hospital release, 
under the Infant and Toddler Safety Car 
Seat Program, parents may rent safety 
seats for a SIO deposit and a 50 cents-a- 
month rental fee. Babies born at the 
hospital are presented the gift of an in- 



would like seats liay make reservations f»"' "' ^«f when discharged 



by calling College Ext. 412. 



Officials noted the program has 



Dr. Turner has been a professor of "^^^"^^ PO^'''^' f'PO"se- 



history at West Chester University since 
1965, he sits on the board of directors 



The new state act requires children 
ages four and under weighing less than 



of the Chester County Historical Society "0. Pounds to be securely fastened in a 
as well as belonging to numerous pro- *"'' ;«'rainl device when in a moving 



fessional, academic and civic groups in- 
cluding the Oral History Association, 
the American Historical Association 
and the American Civil Liberties Union. 



vehicle. 

More information is available at 
the hospital, 322-7861, ext. 5160, bet- 
ween 8:30 a.m. and 4:30 p.m. 



Student help sought in poUcy review 

Student participation is being asked for by Lawrence W. Emery, director of 
counseling, career development and placement, for an institutional self-study of sec- 
tion 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, to review College policies for handicap- 
ped students to make certain they are in compliance with the act. 

Emery stated that the committee will be reviewing programs of study, building 
accessibility, and College policies to update if needed. 

Emery elaborated that the committee was started in November 1984 and asked 
for students' response, but received none. 

He added that once the committee finalizes their report, they will invite groups 
from the community that represent handicapped persons to review the findings. 

The draft will then be kept on file and Emery will advise Dr. Robert L. 
Breuder, College president, about the areas that need improvement. 

Interested students may contact Emery in Room 157 of the Learning Resources 
Center, or i»U College Ext. 246. 



Blue Cross implements 
new admission procedure 

The office of Dr. Miles Williams, 
dean of employee and public relations, 
has released the following information 
for faculty: 

A new Pre-Admission (PAC) pro- 
gram has been implemented by Blue 
Cross of Northeastern Pennsylvania ef- 
fective this month, which is vital to 
anyone facing hospitalization. 

Under this program, about two 
weeks prior to any elective (non- 
emergency) hospital admission, your 
physician must submit a form describing 
your case and condition to the Blue 
Cross Office in Wilkes-Barre, where a 
medical review board will evaluate your 
case and delermine-based on accepted 
norms-whether hospitalization is re- 
quired or whether the procedure can be 
handled safely and adequately on an 
outpatient basis. 

If hospitalization is necessary, Blue 
Cross will certify your admission and 
assign a specific number of inpatient 
days, again based on nationally ac- 
cepted recognized norms. A copy of this 
determination will be sent by Blue Cross 
to you, your physician, and the hospital 
approximately five working days after 
receiving notice of impending 
hospitalization. 

Note that Blue Cross of Nor- 
theastern Pennsylvania will not pay for 
elective admissions to the hospital that, 
occur without this pre-admission cer- 
tification approval. Additionally, Blue 
Cross will not pay for extra charges 
arising from hospital stays beyond the 
initially approved number of days 
unless the ' extra care was medically 
necessary or approved in advance. 

Your physician must submit an ad- 
mission notification to Blue Cross 
within 48 hours of an emergency admis- 
sion. The PAC provisions do not apply 
to cases involving maternity, 
psychiatric, alcohol or drug abuse treat- 
ment, or to medicare cases. 

Brochures providing the above in- 
formation with additional details were 
distributed with the paychecks issued 
Dec. 21. If you have not taken the time 
to read the information, please do so. If 
you have misplaced your copy, please 
call the Personnel Office for another 
copy. Questions should be addressed to 
Personnel Office staff. 

Dr. Robert L. Breuder became the 
College's fifth president in March 1981. 



Budget requests due 

Student organization requests 
: for the College Activities Budget 
; for 1985-86 are due by Monday, 
; Feb. 4, according to Mrs. JoAnn 
: R. Fremiotti, coordinator of m- 
tramural athletics and College ac- 
tivities. 

Mrs. Fremiotti noted that she 
can be contacted at College Ext 
269 to aid organizations with com- 
pleting the proper forms. 



JOE MIGNANO'S SUB SHOP 

CORNER OF 2nd & MAYNARD 

PHONE 323-7443 

One Block from W.A.C.C. 

Daily Specials Monday Regular Sub Whole $1. 



Tuesday Meatball 
Wednesday Turkey 
Thursday Ham 
Friday Tuna 
Saturday Cheese Steak 



Hours: Mon.-Sat II a.m. to 9 p.m. Closed Sun. 



Whole $1.75 
Whole $1.40 
Whole $1.80 
Whole $1.70 
Whole $2.50 



Emery receives NCC certification 



SPOTUGHTDMoidi;, Juur; 21, IMSdII 



Lawrence W. Emery, Jr., director 
of counseling, career development, and 
placement received notification from the 
National Board for Certified 
Counselors, Inc., that he has been cer- 
tified as a Natonal Certified Counselor 
(NCC). 

Requirements for the certification 
include an appropriate master's degree 
frpm an approved program of study, at 



least two years of supervised counseling 
experience, and the passage of a na- 
tionally administered examination. The 
certification is for five years and re- 
quires active continuing education ac- 
tivities in order lo be renewed. 

Emery is also certified as a profes- 
sional counselor by the Pennsylvania 
Professional Counselor Certification 
Board. 



r 



Sarprise! Surprise! 



IRS tax aids available at library 

The Internal Revenue Service has furnished the College Library with a variety 
of materials to help taxpayers prepare their federal income tax forms, according to 
information provided by Mrs. Kate D. Hickey, director of the Learning Resources 
Center. 

One useful aid is audio cassettes containing simple, line-by-line instructions for 
preparing federal Forms 1040EZ, I040A and Schedule I, 1040 and Schedules A, B, 
and W. The cassetus will be available February I. 

Available now is IRS Publication 1194, a four-volume set of the IRS' most re- 
quested publications and Publication 1132, which contains over 90 reproducible tax 
forms that easily can be photocopied for a small fee. In addition. Publication 910, 
the Taxpayer's Guide to IRS Information, Assistance and Publications, is available 
at the library. This publication contains year-round tips on how to obtain tax infor- 
mation, according to Mrs. Hickey. 

Other IRS publications are available for reference. One that can help taxpayers 
prepare their individual tax returns is PubUcation 17, Your Federal Income Tax. 
Federal tax laws applying to business and fanners are explained in Publication 334, 
Tax Guide for Small Business, and Publication 225, Farmer's Tax Guide. 

While College librarians are not expected to serve as tax experts, they will be 
able to direct those interested to these tax aids. The library will be open Monday- 
Thursday, 8 a.m. to 9 p.m., Friday, 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., and Sunday, 2 to 9 p.m. 
For more information, students may contact the LRC at ext. 211. 

PHEAA provides grants to some education majors 

The Pennsylvania Higher Education Assistance Agency has grants available to 
students planning to become teachers in mathematics or science in Pennsylvania 
secondary schools, according to information provided by the Financial Aid Office. 

There are 100 new awards per year, which are renewable throughout 
undergraduate years as long as the renewal requirements are met. 

The grant is a minimum of $1,500, up to half of tuition at 77 schools in Penn- 
sylvania. 

The College is not an eligible school, but any student transferring into a 
teacher education program at one of the eligible schools may apply. 

According to the information given, the Pennsylvania Scholars in Education 
Award Program Grants are the newest and some of the largest grants offered to 
students planning to become mathematics or science teachers. 

One of the eligibility requirements is having a personal commitment to teach, 
because applicants will be asked to complete a written agreement to do so. If the 
teaching fulfillment is completed, the grants are then, in effect, a scholarship. If the 
teaching commitment is not fulfilled, the grants are repayable as a loan, including 
interest charges. 

Brochures explaining further information and eligiblility requirements are 
available in Room 201, Financial Aid Office, Academic Center. The deadline to ap- 
ply is April I for the next academic year. 



m 




RUSSELL W. UMSTEAD, iopervisor of porchising for the Col- 
lege, received quite a snrprise for his birthday u he walked in to his of- 
fice lo fiod it decorated with slretmers and balloons. Karen W. Rlccardo, 
purchasing clerk, and Virginia M. Misslgman, purchijlng assistant, were 
behind the surprise. The real treat came at lunch when Karen and Ginni 
and four others helped Umstead celebrate at the Peter Herdick House, 
the recently-renovated dining mansion, on West Fourth Street. His age? 
No one would offer a leak lo the press! fPhoto by Richard E. Kopp Jr.j 



Anti-discrimination laws outlined 

Courtesy of Lawrence W. Emery, Jr., director of counseling, career development, 
and placement. 

Students are protected against discrimination by various slate and federal laws, 
and alleged violations of any of these may be brought to the attention of Emery, 
who will advise students of the proper course of action. Emery is in Room 157 
Learning Resources Center (LRC), or call College Ext. 246. 

The laws and policies and the area of coverage are as follows: 

Lfliv- Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. PtoAiAiV/om- Discrimination 
against students on the basis of race, color or national origin. 

iaif- Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972. Prohibilions- 
Discrimination against students and employees on the basis of sex. 

IflH-- Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973. Prohibitions- 
Discrimination against handicapped students. 

/•o/Zcv- Board of Trustees Policy on Sexual Harassment. /'roAiA/'/w/w-Sexual 
harassment of students. . 

The Grievance Procedure for any alleged violations is outlined on the mside 
cover of the College Handbook, 1984-85. 



Need to talk? 

Have a problem? 

Come to the .. 



Room 105 
Gymnasium 




Peer Information 
and Referral Center 



Hours: 

Mon-Thurs: 1 -9 p.m. 

Fri: 1 - 5 p.m. 

Sat: Closed 

Sun: 6-9 p.m. 



llaSPOTUGHTOMoDdiy, Jiimrr 21. IMS 

jQAiuiniie A r*Ti\/iTipg I 

For Ihe week of Monday. Jan. 21 through Sunday, Jan. 27 
ACTIVITIES 

Used Book Sale.. .Today, Monday, Jan. 21 through Feb. 1, Phi Beta Lambda 
(PBL) office, Room 3, Academic Center basement. 

Ice Slating... 5:30-10 p.m., this Thursday, Jan. 24, at Ihe Sunbury Youth and 
Community Center, free admission to students, faculty and staff with ticket and 
validated ID; skate rentals, 50 cents; sign up in Room A 137, Lifelong Education 
Center and pick-up ticket; sponsored by College activities. 

Downhill Skiing... 5-midnight, this Wednesday, Jan. 23, at Ski Sawmill, Mor- 
ris; sponsored by College activities. 

MEETINGS 

NirtoUcs Anonymous...? p.m., this Wednesday, Jan. 23, Room 118, 
Building Trade Center. 

Student Government Asjociilion... Executive Committee, 4 p.m., tomorrow, 
Jan. 22, Room 8107, Lifelong Education Center. 

Student Government Aisociilion... Senate, 5 p.m. tomorrow, Jan. 22, Room 
BI07 Lifelong Education Center. 

Alpbi Omega.. .7-10 p.m., tomorrow, Jan. 22, Room 132, Academic Center. 

Service and Operation of Heavy ConitmcUon Equipment Association... 6-8 
p.m., Wednesday, Jan. 23, Room 227, Academic Center. 
SPORTS 

Bukelba0...8 p.m. tomorrow, Jan. 22, against Bucks County Community 
College, away. 

Basketball... 8 p.m., Friday, Jan. 25, a gainst P hiladelphia Community 
College, home. WANTED: One copy of tbe 

Award forms available ('nSist'oTu'irBELiJEFONTE 

Nominations forms and informa- CENTRE DEMOCRAT (Bellefonte); 



tion for the Distinguished Teaching 
Awards can be picked up at the follow- 
ing locations, according to Dr. Roberi 
G. Bowers, executive assistant for inter- 
nal affairs. 

The locations are: The North Cam- 
pus, Natural Resources Management 
Campus, Uarning Resources Center, 
College switchboard. Recreation Center, 
Center for Lifelong Education and Dr. 
Bowers' office. Room 200, Lifelong 
Education Center. 

Deadline to return nominations is 
March 1, slated Dr. Bowers. 




Mlte@r§S5SlF|teij 



THE EVENING SENTINEL 
(Carlisle); THE VALLEY TIMES 
STAR (Ncwvillc); BROCKWAY 
RECORD (Brockway); DUNCAN- 
NON RECORD (Duncannon); THE 
WEEKLY BULLETIN (DUIsburg); 
MARIETTA SUSQUEHANNA 
TIMES (Marietta); VALLEY VIEW 
CITIZEN STANDARD C'a!!;> View); 
PERRY COUNTY TIMES (New 
Bloomfield); THE NEWS ITEM' 
(Shamokin); THE VALLEY 
OBSERVER (Btlleville); UPPER 
DAUPHIN SENTINEL (Millersburg); 
WEST SHORE TIMES 

(Mechanicsbur);). 

Anyone with copies of lhe.se 
newspapers should bring them to the 
SPOTLIGHT office, Room 7, 
Academic Center (basement). All con- 
Iribulnrs will he reimbursed. 

FOR SALE 
1973 Ford Gran Torino. Good student 
car in fair condition. SSOO or best of- 
fer. Call Gisela at Ext. 221 



BENSON 



€MWn mini, ^ 
nnt market 



Comei of 3id and Maynard Sts. 



Alw(Tys Open: 
All Night 
Sundays 
and Holidays 




Financial Aid office 

Financial aid applications for the 
1985-86 year are now available in the 
financial aid office. Room 201, 
Academic Center, according to Donald 
S. Shade, director of financial aid. 

According to Shade, currently 
enrolled students must refile if they plan 
to return for the summer, fall or spring 
1986 terms. 

All students applying for financial 
aid must file a PHEAA/Federal grant 
application besides the College's aid ap- 
plication. 

Students interested in the College's 
work-study program should fill out the 
mentioned forms. The application 
should be in the mail by the middle of 
February so that it is received by the 
May I deadline, according to Shade. 



has 1985-86 forms 

Beginning Tuesday, Jan. 29, a 
financial aid office staff member will be 
available on an appointment basis to 
provide assistance in completing these 
forms. This service will be offered 
from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. on Tuesdays 
and Fridays during the semester. 

Students needing assistance should 
make an appointment, complete as 
much of their application as possible, 
bring along their application and 1984 
Income Tax forms. Dependent students 
must also bring their parents' Federal 
Income Tax forms. 

Will type papers, reports, resumes, 
inexpensively, neatly. Call 
717-S46-8735 after 5 p.m. 



The Placement Office has information on summer employment with Penn's Woods 
Giri Scout camp in Wilkes-Barre and Central Oak Heights in West Milton. 
Part-Time Temporary Employment 

Programmer, days 4-5 hours; System 34-36 a must. MFG/MATICS. Telecom- 
munications experience beneficial. Salary commensurate with experience. Send 
resume to Personnel Manager, P.O. Box 3555, Williamsport. 

For more information contact Lawrence W. Emery, director of counseling, 
career development and placement, at College Ext. 246. 

The College is looking to fill the following positions: Programmer Analyst; 
Coordinator of State Weatherization Program; Dean of Student Services; and 
Director of Physical Plant. 

Salaries for all positions commensurates with credentials. Deadline for applica- 
tions is open. 

For more information contact the Personnel Services Office at College Ext. 
314. 

Sears Roebuck and Co., Lycoming Mall, Muncy, has an opening for a part- 
time small engine repair person for small appliances, tractors and lawnmowers. 
Could work mornings or afternoons. Apply at Sears' Personnel Office before 5 
p.m. Indicate that your application is in response to this notice. 

Babysitter for a 10 month old child, days only, some Saturdays,will work 
around student's schedule. Call Mrs. Rusk at 326-1279. 

Footlocker, Lycoming Mall, Muncy, needs a sales clerk (preferably someone 
in the business related program), 15-25 hours per week. Tuesdays and Thursdays 
10 a.m. -5p.m. or noon-9 p.m. See Del Coslett at the store. Immediate opening. 
Permanent for Graduates 

Food and Hospitality Graduates-Seller's Food Service, Valley Forge Square, 
661 Moore Rd. King of Prussia, 19406 needs managers for college feeding and 
medical institutions. Send a resume to Don Despers, Regional Manager, noting 
which area. 

The Placement Office has information on applying to Rax Restaurants, Inc. 
and Eal'n Park, both headquartered in Pittsburgh. If interested see Mrs. Matilda 
S. Elmer in the Learning Resource Center (LRC) Room 157, or call College Ext. 
239. 

Retail Management-Fashion Bug, Loyal Plaza, needs manager trainees-after 
a 90 day training program relocation would be required, possibly out of state. After 
the training program students would become an assistant manager or a manager 
with manager's salary and benefits. Stop by store and fill out an application. Bring 
a resume with you. 



CILLO'S COLLEGE CORNER 

We'll prepare your favorite Subs and Burgers the way 
you like them! 

Play LUCKY NUMBERS and win a half sub plus a medium 
drink. Four winners every week! 

Cillo's College Corner 

1 100 W. Third St. .Williamsport 

(Next to Academic Center! Phone Ahead: 322 1321 f-^^"- 

Hours: 7:30 a.m. to 6 p.m. 
Fri. 7:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. 




Spotlight 



Monday, Jannir;, 28 1985 • Vol. 20. No. 21 • 8 Pita 
Williuiisporl Ar« Commniiily College • WilUamsport. Pa. 17701 



Dr. Breuder: 'We all must continue to work together ... 



College president responds to sponsorship proposal 



fPlsase see other front page story for 
details on the sponsorship proposal./ 

Dr. Robert L. Breuder, College 
president, spoke at an open meeting 
concerning sponsorship last Thursday 
afternoon in the College Auditorium. 

Dr. Breuder's comments about the 
sponsorship issue included that during 
the proposal made by Richard F. 
Eberhart, Williamsport Area School 
Board president, the College ad- 
ministration and its board of trustees 
were not contacted by those who knew 
about the proposal in WiUiamsport or 
Harrisburg. Dr. Breuder noted that a 
formal statement from the trustees will 
be released this week. 

The administration and the trustees 
agree the College is an educational 
asset, and there will be no interruption 
at the College, which will remain open 
and provide its services. Dr. Breuder 



Inaccuracies noted 

Dr. Breuder said there are things 
being said that are not accurate and the 
trustees feel responsible to set the record 
straight. The president did not elaborate 
on the source of the inaccuracies. The 
trustees and Dr. Breuder agree that the 
state will not intervene on the local issue 
of the College. In the final analysis 
about the state. Dr. Breuder noted that 
the Governor's Commission of Higher 
Education, Financing Commission 
deemed that a one-third partnership of 
state, sponsor, and student funding 
(through tuition), for the past 19 years 
on behalf of this College and other com- 
munity colleges is the right way in the 
future and as a result, there must be a 
local involvement in the community col- 
lege concept. 

College nhes lech idea 

The administration and trustees do 



stated. The school districts are responsi- "ot share in the proposal that the Col- 

ble for kindergarten through 12th grade lege return to a technical institute. This 

education and do not have the apprecia- 's a comprehensive community college 

tion and sensitivity to post-secondary and to return to a technical institute is 

education. Also, the College not a decision to be made by the school 

acknowledges that the current Articles districts or Lycoming County govern- 

of Agreement must be changed, he add- "lent, the president clarified. He added 

ed. Ihat the Pennsylvania legislature can 

Referral Center opens door 
to provide service to students 

student Affairs Editor 

gain assistance for these situations. 

The center deals with such pro- 
blems as relationships with students-and 
instructors, stress, legal services, and 
housing and financial problems. 

The center is staffed by students to 
create a relaxed environment, Bloom 
added. The staff members include 
Timothy C. Bowen, a general studies 
student of Lock Haven; Jane L. Fouike, 
a general studies student of 
Williamsport; Beth A. Holsopple, a 
human services student of State College; 
Michael J. Bloom; and Edward K. 
Fouike, a diesel mechanics student of 
Williamsport. 

Also, on the staff is Claudia M. 
Coats-Parr; a human services student 
who is doing a human services prac- 
ticum at the center. 

"All information will be kept con- 
fidential and students are not asked to 
give their names if they don't want to", 
said Holsopple. 

"One of the services provided is for 
non-traditional students, and it is being 
widely used," stated Bloom. He also 

Please turn lo Page 3... 



By Wanna F. Brown, 

On Monday, Jan. 14 the Peer In- 
formation Referral Center opened its 
doors to provide a new service to the 
student body. 

Three semesters ago Michael J. 
Bloom, a human services student of 
Williamsport, felt that a Peer Student 
Center would be of great benefit to the 
student population. He got together 
with other students to get their opinions 
on the center idea and to expand the 
service available to students at the Col- 
lege. 

The center, staffed by students 
committed to helping other students, is 
located at Bardo Gym, Room 105. The 
students have information about the 
school and outside agencies. If they can- 
not help with a situation, they can refer 
people to the appropriate person or 
agency. 

Their purpose is to assist students 
with problems that revolve around 
school and personal situations, and to 
provide help to students to create a 
relaxed environment and have informa- 
tion available on how to deal with these 
situations or where to send students to 



make this decision and if the College 
loses local control then the inability to 
meet the needs of the community would 
exist. The College Board of Tmstees 
will not move in the direction of a 
technical institute. Dr. Breuder said, 
adding, "It is not in the College's best 
interest and we are proud of our 
heritage and recognize our origin. The 
College wants to move forward, not 
backward." 

Tuition rise under proposal 

Under the school board proposal, 
the state's subsidies, reimbursements 
and student tuition would ftind the Col- 
lege, but if it were to become a technical 
institute, tuition would rise for the 
students. Dr. Breuder said. The purpose 
of the College is to provide education at 
an affordable level, he noted. 

The trustees have been working to 
resolve the complex sponsorship pro- 
blem, and form a relationship with the 
school districts until a new sponsorship 
framework can be established, but the 
school districts have not accepted the in- 
vitation, the president continued. 

In conclusion, Dr. Breuder said,"it 
is important that we all continue to 
work together, pull together and to 




Dr. Robert L. Breoder 

recognize the importance of a college 
family environment. We all have our 
role to play. It's a burden I hate to 
share, that 1 can't carry alone, and a 
good many of you have been willing to 
assist in the endeavor and I appreciate 
that a great deal." 

An estimated audience of 150 plus, 
mainly College faculty and staff, attend- 
ed the session, which lasted about 30 
minutes. Following his presentation. 
Dr. Breuder received a few inquiries and 
comments from those in the auditorium. 



Proposal introduced due to 
College sponsorship dilemma 



By Kalhryn 

A proposal to solve the College 
sponsorship dilemma was proposed at a 
closed meeting Jan. 17 by Richard F. 
Eberhart, president of the Williamsport 
Area School Board, to area school 
district representatives. Also attending 
the meeting were representatives from 
Loyalsock Township and Muncy, non- 
sponsoring school districts. 

This proposal is designed to keep 
the College operating after the present 
sponsorship agreement ends this June 

30, and the plan calls for eventual fun- 
ding for the College through state sub- 
sidies and student tuition, according to 
Eberhart. 

Eberhart 's plan also calls for the 
Lycoming County Commissioners to 
assume College sponsorship on a tem- 
porary basis from July 1, 1985 to Dec. 

31, 1986. The county would be a spon- 
sor in name only to satisfy stale re- 
quirements. No county funds would be 
used 10 support the College, according 
to the proposal. 

Eberhart and Commissioner Gene 
E. Smith said interim county sponsor- 
ship involves transferring of the school 



M. Gilbert 

district funds into the county's hands 
and there is no financial support from 
county funds. For instance, Smith said 
that if the city district budgets $700,000 
a year for its share of the College cost, 
this money will be forwarded to the 
commissioners for College expenses as 
they arise. 

This proposal also calls for the 
commissioners to appoint a new trustee 
board with the board majority being 
made up of superintendents and school 
directors from eight Lycoming County 
school districts. The purpose of appoin- 
ting a new board is a way of 
reinstituting district control over the 
operation of the College. 

The College will operate as a state- 
funded technical school with the Depart- 
ment of Education continuing ap- 
propriations at current levels, according 
to the plan. However, the state take- 
over would not result in a doubling of 
the present student share, since tighter 
control over College spending would 
help the state's contribution. The state 
Department of Education approval is 
Please turn to Page 3... 



•iDSPOTUGHTaMoiidi)', Jinniry 2<. 1985 I 



Whaddya Say...? 

Question: Which media do you get your Information 
from? Why this source? 

Location: Lifelong Education Center 
Photos: Richard E. Kopp Jr. 
Text: Wanna F. Brown 





Korl M. Jones, dietetic techni- 
cian student of Pine Qrove: "Listen- 
ing to the radio, talking to nny friends, 
neighbors and relatives ..because my 
television brol<e and by the time I'm 
done vvith work, all the newspapers are 
sold out." 



Ralph T. Klugh, diesel 
mechanics student of Allison Park: 

"Listening to the radio and watching 
television. ..because the radio is more 
descriptive, more in depth, and televi- 
sion just for the on-the-spot interviews 
and political positions." 



Karen S. Ludwig, broadcasting 



Steve M. Kovalyak, diesel 
student of Trout Run: "Listening 'to mechanics student of RIdgway: 

theradio...becauselspendaloloftime "Watching television and reading the 
in my cat. and I do my homework in my newspaper. because television is a lot 
rQQf^ " easier - I just have to turn it on - more 

for national news, and Ihe paper for 

local news." 




Connie L. Klees, advertising art 
student of Wllllamsport: "Listening to 
the radio.. .because it's always on " 



A first-name basis inspires no respect 



The first class of the semester 
awaits the instructor. Students check 
each other's appearance and admire 
the ceiling lighting, while others gather 
in small groups to discuss their expec- 
tations of the forthcoming class. 

In trots the instructor, who half- 
heartedly apologizes for his tardiness, 
and begins the class by telling the 
students he wants to be referred to by 
his first name. 

Alter the first few sessions, the 
class turns into an entertainment 
showcase and students make a 
mockery of the teacher, shouting his 
first name when they want attention or 
a few laughs. 

Is this the way to run an educa- 
tional environment? 

Is this the way an instructor should 
be treated? 

Should instructors be referred to 
by their first name? 

The hypothetical scene above is a 
known reality to many students at the 
College, as the students made a 
mockery out ol the teacher and the 
learning environment was ruined and 
evaded. 

Many students of that class 
remember the course, but only thai 
they "had a good time", which if asked 
that by a prospective employer, will not 
produce a successful career. 

And isn't that why we are here and 
why we are shelling out our dollars lor 
these classes? 

The SPOTLIGHT may be from the 



"old school" {no pun intended), but we 
leel that Instructors should be referred 
to by their proper names in the order of 
respect, courtesy, and non-favorltlsm. 

Vast majorities of students are 
taught from grades K through 12 to 
refer to their teachers as "f^iss Pringle" 
or "Mister Haus". and find it difficult or 
uncomfortable to call a teacher by their 
first name. Especially after the former 
was ingrained into them - as a way of 
respecting, and therefore learning 
something Irom their teachers. 

Others may see the first-name 
basis as "brown-nosing" and feel that 
their fellow students who refer to 
teachers in this way have an edge 
over them when It comes to the final 
tallying of grades. 

The instructor should be in com- 
mand ol the class, holding some type 
of leadership and control in order to 
keep his students' attention when 
listening to a lecture or holding a class 
discussion. 

And we also feel that students 
should hold a regard for the experience 
of the teachers, many ol whom at the 
College not only have teaching ex- 
perience, but years of knowledge in 
their actual fields. Addressing teachers 
by their proper names and titles 
signifies that regard. 

Another point of view on the sub- 
ject was expressed by one who has 
been in the teaching business for about 
35 years, and is an Instructor at the 
College 



When posed the dilemma, he 
replied that some students may feel 
disgruntled and alienated from other 
students when they cannot make 
themselves use first names, but Ihe 
professor pointed out that the basic 
thread was not what the instructor Is 
called, but how good a teacher he is. 

He elaborated that the teacher 
should not command respect, but also 
should not be too casual, or he risks a 
breakdown between himself and his 
students. 

He also fell that in the mockery 
situation, the instructor was trying to be 
accepted, but used the wrong ap- 
proach. 

In relation to adult and elderly 
students, the faculty member noted 
that since they are more than likely us- 
ed to the rigid secondary school 
system, they usually fell uncomfortable 
about a week, but seem to adjust to 
various College classroom en- 
vironments. That Is as long as the in- 
structor Is fair, consistent, and lets his 
position be known. 

But may it not be true that students 
FEEL they can get "closer" to the first- 
name instructor and "brown-nose" 
them since the teacher okayed the first- 
name, personal reference? 

In the conclusion of the 
SPOTLIGHT'S opinion, the majority of 
the staff feel that referring to instructors 
by their first names dissolves class uni- 
ty and a good, professional learning 
situation 



Robert P. Cassarly, engineering 
drafting technology student of Hun- 
tingdon: "Watching television and 
listening to the radio. ..because wat- 
ching television is easier - all you have 
to do is turn It on - and it saves time. I 
listen to the radio because I can do 
something else, like homework, while 
it's on." 



SPOTLIGHT 
Monday, January 2B, 1985 - Vol. 20, No. 21 

The SPOTLIGHT Is published each Monday 
morning of the academic year, except for Col- 
lege vacations, by journalism and other in- 
terested students of The Williamsport Area Com- 
munity College 

Office: Room 7, Academic Center. 1005 
W Third St., Wiillamsport, Pa 17701, 
Telephone: (717) 326-3761, Extension 221. 



Opinions expressed are those ol the student 
newspaper or of those whose names accom- 
pany items Opinions do not reflect official opi- 
nion of the institution 



THE STAFF 

Karen M fyletarko. Managing Edilor 

James K Morrissey, Edilorial Page Editor 

Richard E Kopp Jr , Photograpny Edilor 

Donna M Barnetl, Darkroom Technician 

Kathryn M Gilbert, Adminislralive Attairs Editor 

Wanna F. Brown, Student Affairs Editor 

Sandra R Taylor, Advertising Manager 

Anne T Moratelli, Advertising Assistant 

Kathleen L Eiswert, Sports Editor 

Gisela D Grassley. Production Supervisor 

Rodney Hill and fwlark S Schwanke. Sen/or 

Staff Writers 

REPORTERS/STAFF ASSOCIATES 

Cynthia E A Harlranit, Kelly S Heriold 
Sandra L Musgrave, Judith L Swinehart, Jen- 
niler S White. LeRoy S Whilmire Jr 
Faculty adviser, Anthony N Cillo 
Acting adviser Mrs Louise H Sweeney 

Producllon StaH This Issue 

Kathryn M Gllben, copy editor: Donna M 
Sarnett. Richard E Kopp Jr , and Karen M. 
Metarko. videocomposilion, and Wanna F 
Brown, Kelly S Herrold, Judith L, Swinehart 
and LoRoy S. trtfhltmire Jr.. production 
assistants. 



College is offering applied 
ethics courses this semester 



SSPOTLIGHTDMoiidi;, Jugw; M, 19«5d3 '■ 



In an attempt to "attract a non- 
traditional population of students who 
want bits of information" the College's 
Integrated Studies division is offering a 
series of seven applied ethics courses 
this semester, according to Mrs. 
Veronica M. Muzic, division director. 

The series, set for health care pro- 
fessionals, business and industry and 
law enforcement personnel, is a way to 
"expand our offerings," Mrs. Muzic 
said. 

The first class. Theory of Applied 
Ethics began last Tuesday, and will run 
Tuesdays and Thursdays from 6:30 
p.m. to 9:30 p.m. until Feb. 7 and is a 
one-credit hour module, as are the other 
six. 

The first course will hit upon the 
debate and analysis of contemporary 
social problems, including Egoism, 
Relativism, and the principle of Justice. 
This course is also a prerequisite for the 
other modules. 

The next course is Life and Death 
Issues which is to be held Feb. 9 to 
March 2, on Saturdays from 9 a.m. to 1 
p.m., and includes topics of abortion, 
euthanasia, genetic counseling and 
patemahsm. 

Other courses are: 
--Maintaining the Integrity of the 
Health Care Profession: Saturdays, 9 
a.m. to I p.m., April 13 to May 4, 
topics include telling the truth, informed 
consent, behavior control and confiden- 
tiality. 

-Corporate and Social Responsibility: 
Tuesdays and Thursdays, 6:30 p.m. to 
9:30 p.m. Feb. 19 to March 5, topics in- 
clude advertising ethics and en- 
vironmental concerns. 
-Employee Rights in Business: Satur- 
days from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m., March 9 to 
March 30, topics including affirmative 
action, whistleblowing and discrimina- 
tion. 



-Moral and Legal Issues in Nursing: 

Tuesdays and Thursdays from 6:30 
p.m. to 9:30 p.m., April 9 to April 23, 
topics include privacy, patient ad- 
vocacy, lying to patients, and peer rela- 
tionships 

-Ethics and Law Enforcement Person- 
nel: Tuesdays and Thursdays from 6:30 
p.m. to 9:30 p.m., April 9 to April 
23,topics include privacy, suppression 
of evidence, police rights and use of 
force. 

The applied ethics courses were 
also modeled as a marketing initiative 
and there is a charge of $37.15 per 
course for sponsored students and 
$83.85 per course for non-sponsored 
students. 

Mrs. Muzic stated that persons 
wishing to register for the courses may 
do so up until the first meeting of the 
course. 

All courses will be taught in Room 
309, Academic Center, and will be in- 
structed by Robert M. Timko, part-time 
philosophy and ethics instructor at the 
College. 

For more information, Mrs. Muzic 
may be contacted at College Ext. 331. 

Proposal introduced 

Continued from Page I... 

necessary for the plan's implementa- 
tion. 

The school boards will not take any 
action on the proposal until next month 
after the districts have discussed the 
matter at regular board meetings. Time 
is important because of the sponsorship 
deadline, so a decision has to be made 
soon, according to Eberhart. 

The current 14 sponsoring school 
districts outside Lycoming County 
would be released of their obligations to 
the College in this agreement plan, ex- 
cept for those involved in bond issues. 



Four hundred and fifty-one 
students on academic probation 



Four hundred and fifty-one of the 
College's students for the the Fall 1984 
semester were placed on academic pro- 
bation, according to John F. Thomp- 
son, associate academic dean. 

Academic probation is given to 
students who have under a 1.5 
cumulative average at the end of their 
first semester, a 1 .8 at the end of the se- 
cond, and a 1.9 at the end of the third, 
and others who have below a 2.0 
cumulative average. 

Probation committees met last 
Dec. 19 and staff from all divisions took 
part of the load due to the high volume 
of probationary students. 

In other academic information, 90 
students were terminated from the Col- 
lege. Out of that number, 36 appealed 
and 28 were readmitted and with eight 
denied, for a total of 62 students finally 
terminated. 

According to Thompson, these 



figures are about average in compari- 
sion with other semesters. 

The appeal process was held on Jan. 
2, Thompson said, and with a one-on- 
one approach, with students meeting 
with Lawrence W. Emery Jr., director 
of counseling, career development and 
placement, and R. Dean Foster, direc- 
tor of developmental studies. 

The two then talked with the 
students' instructors, and made recom- 
mendations to Thompson, who made 
the final determinations. 

According to the College's student 
handbook, the College may terminate 
students for not paying their bills, 
meeting course requirements, or 
demonstrating "unsafe practices". 

In the appeal process, the student 
is recommended to follow the procedure 
of consulting the instructor, appealing 
to the division director and then the 
dean of academic affairs. 



Martin appointed dean of student services 

Appointed as the new dean of stu- 
dent services today was Dr. William J. 
Martin, the former director of secon- 
dary vocational programs. He has suc- 
ceeded Dr. Rodney 0. Hurley, who left 
the College last December for a position 
at Hillsborough Community College in 
Tampa, Fla. 

Dr. Martin began his career at the 
College as the secondary director in 
February 1983, and before that was the 
principal of the Williamsport High 
School from 1976 to 1983. 

Dr. Martin taught at the high 
school from 1968-76 as a biology 
teacher for vocational students. 

The new dean stated that the Col- 
lege adminstration intends to appoint in 
an interim director of secondary voca- 
tional programs. 




m 



I 



Valentine's Day Love Bouquet 

S carnations, baby's Single carnations are also^ 
breath, fern and ribbon in available 60' each or $6 a 
a glass bud vase with dozen (fern and bow ex- 
card. Only $3.50 tra) 



add a special touch with an 7 love you balloon 'for $1 



10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Feb 14 
Academic Center Lobby 
and Susquehanna Room 
foyer 



sponsored by the 

Horticulture 

. Club 




Dr. WUIiam J. Martin 

Referral Center 

Continued from Page I... 
said, "This is a valuable service for 
students and school. If we can help one 
student we feel we have justified our ex- 
istence." 

When asked what services they still 
needed to obtain, Holsopple and 
Bloom replied, "What we need is a 
phone to better facilitate our referral of 
students. We hope to remedy that in 
the near future." 

Bloom added, "We've had a great 
deal of help for out organization from 
such people as Mrs. JoAnn R. Fremiot- 
ti, coordinator of intramural athletics 
and College activities, and Janet R. 
Querimit, the College nurse." 

Thomas A. Zimmerman, instructor 
of human services and social science, 
advises and helps provide staff training. 
The center is supervised by 
Lawrence W. Emery Jr., director of 
counseling, career development, and 
placement. The Student Government 
Association (SGA) has also helped pro- 
vide funds for its operation. 

Hours for the center are 1 p.m. to 
9 p.m., Monday-Thursday, 1 to 5 p.m. 
on Fridays and 6 to 9 p.m., Sunday. 
The center is closed on Saturdays. 



■4DSPOTLlGHTDMon(liy, Jinmry M. IMS ! 



Student Interest Briefs 



Anthropology professor to speak here 



Financial forms are 
still available 

Financial aid applications for the 
1985-86 year are now available in the 
Financial Aid Office, Room 201, 
Academic Center, according to Donald 
S. Shade, director, flnancial aid. 

He stressed that currently enrolled 
students must refile if they plan to 
return for the summer, fall or spring 
1986 terms. 

All students applying for financial 
aid must file a PHEAA/Financial grant 
application besides the College's aid ap- 
plication. 

Students interested in the College's 
work-study program should also fill out 
the mentioned forms. The application 
should be in the mail by the middle of 
February so that it is received by the 
May deadline, according to Shade. 

Beginning Tuesday, Jan. 29, a 
financial aid office staff member will be 
available on an appointment basis to 
provide assistance on completing the 
forms. This service will be offered from 
8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. on Tuesdays and 
Fridays during the semester. 

Students needing assistance should 
make an appointment, fill out as much 
of the application as possible, and bring 
along their application and 1984 Income 
Tax forms. Dependent students must 
also bring their parents' Federal Income 
Tax forms. 



Register early for popular 
second session courses 

All persons interested in taking a 
non-credit course during the second 
session are reminded to register early, 
according to Mrs. Carol F. Kaufman, 
coordinator of community and personal 
development programs. 

The second session courses are to 
begin March 11, and the brochure will 
be available in the Center for Lifelong 
Education Office, Room 102, Academic 
Center, the first week of February, ac- 
cording to Mrs. Kaufman. 

"We mail brochures to a limited 
list of students; those who look courses 
last session and to those persons who 
call or write in to request one," said 
Mrs. Kaufman. She noted that one- 
third of the students enrolled in classes 
during one session will return for 
another session. 

Mrs. Kaufman said some of the 
popular classes for the current session 
are Stained Glass I, Guitar 1, Wines of 
Italy, Mixology I, Carpentry and 
Woodworking, Autobody Ilepair, Per- 
sonal Financial Planning, Aerobic 
Dancercize and Creative Movement for 
Tots. Mrs. Kaufman noted that these 
classes were filled before regular credit 
classes began in January. 

Sparkle with Colors, Computer 
Literacy, Photography I, combination 
Welding, Woodworking, Rollerskating 
for Childern and Dancersize also filled 
quickly according to Mrs. Kaufman. 



Bookstore returns 
to regular hours 

The College Bookstore has return- 
ed to its regular hours, according to 
Mrs. Eleonore R. Holcomb, supervisor 
of the Bookstore. 

The Bookstore will be open from 8 
a.m. to 4:30 p.m. 

Mrs. Holcomb stated that 'ring 
day' will be held on Jan. 29. A 
representative from the Herff-Jones 
Company will have a ring display in the 
Bookstore. Orders will be Uken and 
there will be a special discount. Dis- 
count prices vary depending on the 
type 01 ring ordered. The representative 
will be in the Bookstore from 10 a.m. to 
4 p.m. 

A deposit of $20 is necessary for 
each ring ordered, Mrs. Holcomb said. 



Tutoring Center is official- 
ly open 

The Tutorial Center is officially 
open and running smoothly, according 
to Mrs. Diana L. Kuhns, director of the 
Tutorial Lab. Schedules containing the 
names of students available for tutoring 
services may be picked up in Mrs. 
Kuhns' office, in Room 161 in the 
Library, located in the Learning 
Resources Center, Mrs. Kuhns stated. 



The College offers 
microcomputer courses 

The Business and Computer 
Technologies Division at the College is 
offering a series of microcomputer 
courses. 

According to Dr. Donald B. 
Bergerstock, director of the business 
and computer technologies division, 
these courses are designed for anyone 
seeking the practical skills needed to use 
a microcomputer at work, home or 
school. 

Each course in the microcomputer 
series is worth one academic credit. To 
make them more accessable to the 
public, many courses are available in 
the afternoon, in the evening and on 
weekends. 

For more information on the 
schedule and course description please 
contact Dr. Bergerstock at 236-3761, 
Ext. 225. 



Students can participate 
in this year's Open House 

student organizations who would 
like to participate in Open House this 
year must contact Mrs. Jo Ann R. 
Fremiotti, coordinator of intramural 
athletics and College activities by the 
end of today to enable completion of an 
activity report. 

Open House is scheduled for 
March 24 from noon to 4:30 p.m. This 
year's theme is "20 Years Of Service". 



Courtesy College litformalion Office 

Dr. Marshall J. Becker, Professor 
of Anthropology at West Chester 
University, will speak about "The First 
Pennsylvanians: Indian Nations" at 8 
p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 12 in the Academic 
Center Auditorium. 

The slide-illustrated lecture will be 
sponsored jointly by the College's 
Special Events Committee and the Pen- 
nsylvania Humanities Council. Dr. 
Becker will speak about the I^nape, 
Munsee, Susquehannock, 

Monongahela, Delaware, and other 
native American tribes who were in this 
country long before Columbus. How 
they lived, their dealings with each other 
and the Europeans, and what became of 
them is the subject of Dr. Becker's lec- 
ture. 

Dr. Becker is an archaeologist and 
physical anthropologist whose research 
in many areas has achieved interna- 
tional recognition. He earned his Ph. D. 
at the University of Pennsylvania, where 
he also completed his undergraduate 
work with honors in anthropology. He 
is a member of Phi Beta Kappa and Pi 
Gamma Mu (the social science honor 
society), as well as several other 
honorary societies and numerous pro- 
fessional organizations. 

Noted for his work of Bronze Age 
trade and Greek Colonial settlement in 
the Mediterranean, American Colonial 
archaeology and ethnohistory, and the 
ancient Maya, Dr. Becker is interested 
in all aspects of cultural contact as they 
relate to cultural change. He travels fre- 



quently to sites both in Central America 
and throughout the Classical World to 
conduct research and act as a consultant 
on projects in his areas of expertise. 

In his extensive research into the 
life and culture of the Lenape Indians of 
southeastern Pennsylvania, from the 
time of their first contact with the Euro- 
pean settlers until 1740, Dr. Becker 
employs both ethnohistoric and ar- 
chaeological techniques to provide com- 
plementary information. The first 
volume of reporting on this research is 
about to be completed and several 
papers are already available. 

Dr. Becker publishes the results of 
all his researcli regularly in both 
scholarly journals and popular 
magazines. He has contributed the in- 
troductory chapter to the book, Maya 
Archaeology and Ethnohistory and has 
several other chapters in various books. 
He frequently presents papers at profes- 
sional meetings as well as to regional 
civic organizations and is active in a 
number of professional associations, 
organizing and participating in con- 
ferences and seminars, holding office, 
serving on boards, and editing publica- 
tions. He is a past president of the 
Philadelphia Anthropological Society. 

The anthropologist will be the se- 
cond speaker in a series of lecturers to 
appear at the College this winter and 
spring. 

No admission fee will be charged. 

For more information, call the Col- 
lege Activities Office, College ext. 412. 



The Metropolitan Brass Quintet 
In Concert 




Featuring Musical Selections From The 
Sixteenth Thru The Twentieth Centuries 

Sunday, February 3, 1985 — 4 p.m. 

The Williamsport Area Community College 
Academic Center Auditorium 

A Free Program 

Sponsored By The Special Events Committee 
The Williamsport Area Community College 

For additional information and reservations 
Call 326-3761, extension 412 

Represented By The Great Lafces Performing Artist Association 



SPOTLIGHTDMonday, January 28, I98Sd5 



Fourteen 'students' participate 
in College changing careers course 



A section of 14 people from the 
community recently participated in a 
"Changing Careers" course offered by 
the College's Counseling, Career 
Development, and Placement office, ac- 
cording to Lawrence W. Eraery Jr., 
dean of that area. 

The course was at the James V. 
Brown library in downtown 
Williamsport Jan. 15 to 17, and 22 to 
24. Thomas C. Shoff, a College 
counselor, taught the no tuition charge 
program. 

Providing a service to the com- 
munity for those who need additional 
training is the purpose of the special 
non-credit course, Emery stated. He ad- 
ded that there are no "eligibility re- 
quirements" to attend the course, which 
is for persons of all ages and from all 
walks of life. 

Emery will be teaching the same 
course in a four hour block of time at 
Selinsgrove High School this Wednes- 
day and Thursday, he stated. Total cost 
of the course is $5 per person, for 
testing and other career-oriented 
materials. 

The maximum number of 
"students" in the course is 30, which 
Emery stated he has taught in previous 
classes. 

Emery noted that when leaving the 
course, participants will at least have a 
specific activity to work on, i.e., short- 
term career goals. He added that they 
will also have a better sense of their 
career interest, their values, and prior- 
ties. 

The College also benefits from 
these courses, in that Emery estimated 
that 10 percent of each group enrolls at 
the College in some form-full-time, 
part-time, or night and special courses. 

The "Changing Careers" course 
was also recentlv offered at the North 
Campus in Wellsboro Jan. 19 and 26, 
taught by Anne L. Cridler, a casual 
part-time counselor at the campus. The 
cost for that course was $23. 

Emery noted that he taught the 
course at the North Campus last 
semester to six people, which he noted 
was a good amount for that area. 

The counseling office also provides 
other career-minded services for the 
community, under the heading of 
Career Exploration for Adults, such as 
the "interest inventories" on Friday 
mornings. 

Emery detailed that Thomas M. 
McNally, College counselor, talks with 
usually ten people from the community 
who are "non-students" and they them 
complete an interest inventory, which is 
a questionnaire that helps indicate if the 
person would be successful in a field 
they choose to pursue. The question- 
naire answers are compared to the 
"norm", or a group of those who are 
successful in the field, to find the per- 
sons success indicators. 

Persons can call the counseling of- 
fice to set up a Friday morning appoint- 
ment and are given an initial career ex- 



ploration talk before the inventory is 
adminstered. 

Emery would like to expand the 
service, but noted that supplies and time 
are not avaiable, as each inventory cost 
$5 and counseling staff takes turns with 
the workload. 

The service is not to be confused 
with the six-week program of the same 
name, which is coordinated by G. 
Robert Converse, coordiantor of 
federally-funded career education pro- 
grams. 

This course incorporates a trial of 
programs of study, where the 
"students" are briefly lectured by an in- 
structor and then work on a mini- 
practicum to decide whether they want 
to enter a certain field. 

Emery said that College students 
can also take the interest inventory, and 
appointments may be made by contac- 
ting College Ext. 246. 

Women's Week meet 
to make preparations 

The Women's Week meeting was 
held Wednesday, January 16, in Room 
B107, Lifelong Education Center 
(LEC), according to Mrs. JoAnn R. 
Fremiotti, coordinator of intramural 
athletics and College activities. 

Issues discussed at the meeting 
were artists and speakers who will be 
featured during Women's Week on 
April 14. 

The theme this year will be 
"Women as Artist" said Mrs. Fremiot- 
ti. 



Circle K 
Membership 
Drive 1985 

You've made it through Ihe years gone by, 

but now you face the worst! 
You've loads of work and liltle time, 

your mind's about to burst. 
You've found yourself, your're lost again... 

you don't know who to be. 
You look around for help through this, 

but find no one to see. 
Have hope, my friend, there is somone, 

10 help you through this day. 
With love and hope and care and more, 

for you there is CIRCLE K!! 
We work for others and ourselves, 

we find ourselves and more. 
We learn that others need us loo, 

and that is what this club is for. 
We feel the pride of helping out 

and give the sad chance. 
We see iheir hope and joy return. 

it's in their slightest glance. 
We help the young and old alike, 

and families through their strife. 
We make them feel that someone cares, 

and that there's more to Ufe. 
We meet new friends, the lasting kind, 

who stand beside our sides. 
We have their help though Uiick and thin, 

they act just like our guides. 
Break that slump you're in, 

and reach to come and join us. 
You'll help us make our theme come true; 

"Achieve Unity Through Service." 

Circle K needs You! s a sharkna 

Join tlie People Who Care! 

Come to our next meeting, this Wednesday, Jan. 30, 3:30 p.m. 
Room B107, Lifelong Education Center. 



Movie of the Week 




Tonight 7:30 p.m. 
ACC Auditorium 



$1 (with ID) 
$2 (without ID) 



►♦♦♦ 



■6DSPOTLICinnMondiy. Jinnirr M, 1W5 



Dew Crew takes first place 
in IM bowling last semester 

Dew Crew captured first place in the first half final standings in the intramural 
bowling league, according to information provided by ABC Bowling Lanes 's 
management. 

The team standings were: Dew Crew; WACC Five-0; tied for third: We Three; 
Lucky Strikes; Pin Busters; tied for sixth Scratch; The Outlaws; and Defenders of 
the Faith. 

High Average winners were Mark Reamsnyder-196; Denise King-136. 

High Series winners were Rudy Long-621; Denise McNeil-475. 

High Single winners were Barry Boney-238; Denise NcNeil-191. 

Most improved average winners were Rudy Long plus 10; Denise McNeil 
plus3. 

All-around champs include Steve Roeder, George Ponchine, and Denise King. 

Trophies were awarded to all high scorers. 

\Sports Schedules \ 





The following are the schedules for 
the intramural basketball, volleyball, 
and coed volleyball games, according to 
David A. Golfieri, evening activities 
assistant. Playoffs begin the first week 
of March. 

Men's Basketball 

(All games main court) 

MoDdiy, JaD. 28 

6:30 - SPOTLIGHT vs. G-(own 

7:30 - Payton Gang vs. Bums 

8:30 - Dunk-you-very-much vs. Moondogs 

Wedondiy, Jan. 30 

6:30 - Dunk-you-very-much vs. Paylon Gang 

7:30 - SPOTLIGHT vs. Moondogs 

8:30 - G-lown vs. Bums 

Scumbuzzards improve rep 

After two weeks, the Scumbuzzards 
have taken the lead in the intramural 
bowling league, according to informa- 
tion Drovided by the ABC Bowling 
Lanes management. Lucky Strikes, 
Pinbusters are trailing in a close second 
place by one game. 

Team StandiDgi 
Scumbuzzards 5-1 
Lucky Strikes 4-2 
Pinbusters 4-2 
Defenders of the Faith 3-3 
The Outlaws 3-3 
Two plus One 3-3 
Dew Crew 2-4 
No. 8 0-6 

Higb Team Series 
Outlaws-] 860 
Two plus One-1776 
Dew Crew-1711 

High Team Single 
Outlaws-699 
Dew Crew-64S 
Two plus One-626 

Men's Higb Series 
Mark Reamsnyder-644 
Paul Maserick-549 
Scott Kehs-539 

Men's Higb Single 
Mark Reamsnyder-287 
Paul Maserick.230 
Bryan Valcnline-202 

Top Five Averages: Mark Reamsnyder, 
192; George Panchione, 188; Bryan Valentine, 
185, Rick Jackson, 182; Rudy Long, 172; and 
Paul Maserick, 172. 

Denise McNeil is the only women bowler 
this semesler-series-360; singlc-124. 



Men's VoUeyball 

Division 1 
Thursday, Jan. U 

6:30 - Payton Gang vs. Plunkers 

7:30 ~ Ballbangers vs. Bums 

8:30 - Independents vs. No names 

Tuesday, Jan. 29 

6:30 - No names vs. Bums 

7:30 - Independents vs. Plunkers 

8:30 - Paylon Gang vs. Ballbangers 

Thursday, Jan. 31 

6:30 ~ Paylon Gang vs. Independents 

7:30 " No names vs. Ballbangers 

8:30 - Bums vs. Plunkers 

Coed Volleyball 

Monday, Jan. 28 

6 - No names vs. Bums 

7 - Ball WACCers vs. Cardiac Kids 

8 - VT I02's vs. Cardiac Kids 

9 - Bums vs. VT I02's 

Wednesday, Jan. 30 

6 - Cardiac Kids vs. Bums 

7 - No names vs. Ball WACCer 

8 - VT 102' vs. Ball WACCers 

9 - No names vs. VT I02's 

Monday, Feb. 4 

6 - No names vs. Cardiac Kids 

7 - No names vs. VT I02's 

8 - Bums vs. Ball WACCers 
9 - Bums vs. Cardiac Kids 

Other lists are available from the Recrea- 
tion Center Office, AI37, Lifelong Education 
Center. 



Maybe that is one reason for his suc- 
cess. 

Winter activities available for students at College 

A beginners clinic for cross country ty Center, Sunbury, on Thursday, Feb. 

skiers in addition to various other 7 and Thursday, I'eb. 28. 
winter activities are being sponsored Transportation leaves the LRC bus 

through intramural athletics and Col- loop at 5:30 p.m. and will return at 10 

lege activities in cooperation with the p.m. 

Center for Lifelong Education, accor- Skate rental is 50 cents and the trip 

ding to David A. Golfieri, evening ac- is free to students, faculty and staff vrith 

tivities assistant. He added that all ac- admission tickets and validated ID's. 
tivities are "weather permitting". Downhill skiing trips are also being 

The skiing clinics, offered at White offered to Ski Sawmill, Morris on 

Deer Golf course, will be held from 3 Wednesday, Feb. 6, Wednesday, Feb 13 

p.m. to 7 p.m. on Thursday, Jan. 31, and Wednesday, Feb. 27. 
from 8:30 a.m. to 11 a.m. Saturday, Transportation will leave the LRC 

Feb 2, and from 3 p.m. to 7 p.m. on bus loop at 5 p.m. and will return at 12 

Tuesday, Feb. 5. a.m. 

Transportation will be provided by PqqI tournament sisn UD 

College activities and will depart from ^""' lOUHldlllcm Mgll up 
the LRC bus loop. Any full or part time student. 

Prices for ski rentals are $2.50 for faculty or staff interested in a pool tour- 

the first hour; $1.50 for the second "ament may sign up in Roon A-137, 

hour, and $5 if over two hours. recreation center office in the Lifelong 

Interested students should sign up Education Center (LEC), according to 



Sportj Commenliry 
By Rodney D. Hill 



49er's mike final entry in 84-85 record books 

MV./4a'AMn/MW«l I Kt I UM < <i«MIW*lil«4tM >NW 



Forty-Niners were ol all teams lo make A few months back 1 picked the 

the playoffs, the least heard of. San Francisco Forty-Niners to play in 

On Super Sunday, 1985, the the Super Bowl against the Los Angeles 

Dolphins came into the game as the Raiders, but what I didn't know was 

overwhelming favorites with a 16 and 2 that Dan Marino was going to rewrite 

record and the Forty-Niners came into the record book in a number of seasonal 

the game as the immediate area's stats. 

favorite with a 17 and 1 record. The When Marino was approaching the 

game was played 30 miles from the record for touchdown passes in one 

Forty-Niners hometown. season, he had all the attention of fans 

The Forty-Niners came into the and anybody associated with profes- 

game a bit differently than the sional football. Obviously, as a result of 

Dolphins. They didn't set records and his record performances, his team was 

they didn't have a "killer-bee" defense, at the top of their division and they were 

But, after the final gun, the score also the last team to stay unbeaten 

read: San Francisco, 38 and Miami, 16. through most of the season. 

Records were broken in the game, all by Since Marino and the Miami 

San Francisco. San Francisco walked Dolphins were in the eyes of the media 

off with $18,000 more than what Miami and public, all other teams seemed to 

did, since the winners were guaranteed have played second fiddle. The National 

$36,000. Football Conference (NFC) was not re- 

The quarterback of the Forty- establishing the record book with the ex- 

Niners, Joe Montana, was named the ception of one career mark, when 

most valuable player of the game, his Walter Payton broke Jim Brown's 

second award in as many games. He has rushing record, 

the distinction of sharing that honor The Chicago Bears and the Dallas 

with only two other quarterbacks, Bart Cowboys were probably more newswor- 

Starr and Terry Bradshaw. thy than any other teams. The Bears 

I think the best part of the televi- finally making the playoffs and the 

sion coverage was the interview with one Cowboys not making them was quite a 

of the most respected coaches of all shock. 

time, Don Shula, a winner regardless if In the semi-final NFC round the 

his team wins or loses. Bears beat the Eastern Divison champs, 

Shula displayed some of the finest the Washington Redskins, for the right 
sportsmanship that a person would ever to play the Forty-Niners for the con- 
see. Shula, interviewed by ABC com- ference crown and a trip to Stanford 
mentator O.J. Simpson, had an ex- Stadium to play on January 20th. 
tremely friendly smile as he said the Just like the 82-83 season, the 
Forty-Niners deserved to win the game Forty-Niners were a quiet team that was 
and there were no excuses for his team, unheard of and played a mediocre 
schedule and only to become well 
known after a Super Bowl win. The 



in Room A-137 recreation center. 

Deadline for sign-ups is 8 p.m. on 
Wednesday, Jan. 30. 

Two ice skating trips are being of- 



fered at Sunbury Youth and Communi- °f"'' E"'- '•'2- 



David A. Golifieri, evening activities 
assistant. 

Further information can be obtain- 
ed by contacting the Recreation Center 



Gym available 

Any student may schedule the east 
or west part of the gym Monday- 
Thursday for a one hour time period 
when space is available, according to 
David A. Golfieri, evening activities 
assistant. 

Some of the activities included are 
badmittion and table tennis. 

Sign-ups will take place from 8 
a.m. to 2 p.m. in Room A137 in the 
Lifelong Education Center. If there are 
no sign-ups, the gym will be offered on 
a first come, first serve basis, Golfieri 
said and added that time and space 
availability will be on hand when 
students sign up. 



Wildcats' schedule 

Mon. Jan. 28 vs PSU Schuykill, away 
Tue. Jan. 29 vs Lock Haven Jv, home 
Wed. Jan. 30 vs Luzerne County CO, 
away 



Brass Quintet will 
perform at College 

By Wanna F. Brown, Student Affairs 
Editor 

In conjunction with the College's 
Special Events Committee and the Pen- 
nsylvania Humanities Council, The 
Metropolitan Brass Quintet, which 
comes from the Cleveland, Ohio area, 
will be performing this Sunday, Feb. 3 
in the Academic Center auditorium at 4 
p.m. 

They will be playing selections 
from the sixteenth through the twentieth 
centuries. 

The performance is free to all; 
however, groups who would like seats 
may make reservations by calling Col- 
lege Ext. 412. 

The quintet is made up of Ralph 
Ponti, (trumpet); John Brndiar, 
(trumpet); Michael Lewellen, (horn); 
James Taylor, (trombone) and Gary 
Adams, (tuba). 

Ponti is the newest member of the 
quintet. He also performs with the 
Eastern Brass Quintet and the Cleveland 
Orchestra as an extra musician. He is a 
faculty member at the Ashtibula Arts 
Center. Brndiar is a member of the 
Ohio Chamber Orchestra and also per- 
forms with the Cleveland Orchestra and 
the Erie Philharmonic as an extra musi- 
cian. He is on the faculty of the 
Cleveland Institute of Music. Lewellen 
performs as an auxiliary member of the 
Cleveland Orchestra. He is a faculty 
member of he Cleveland Institute of 
Music. Taylor is principal trombone 
with the Ohio Chamber Orchestra, the 
Erie Philharmonic, and performs as an 
extra musician with the Cleveland Or- 
chestra. He is presently on the faculty at 
Cleveland State University. Adams also 
plays for the Canton Symphony, the 
Erie Philharmonic, and is a free lance 
player throughout the Cleveland area. 

The quintet is represented by the 
Great Lakes Performing Artist 
Associates. 




U^^ 



Special Events Committee 
will present guest lecturers 

The Special Events Committee of 
the College will be presenting a series of 
special guest lecturers this spring, accor- 
ding to Mrs. JoAnn R. Fremiotti, coor- 
dinator of intramural athletics and Col- 
lege activities and a member of the com- 
mittee. Three of the speakers will be 
presented by the committee in coopera- 
tion with the Pennsylvania Humanities 
Council, Mrs. Fremiotti said. 

The first speaker in the series. Dr. 
John J. Turner Jr., will appear in the 
Academic Center Auditorium at 8 p.m. 
Tuesday, Jan. 29. No admission fee will 
be charged. 

Dr. Turner's appearance is co- 
sponsored by the Humanities Council, 
and he will speak on the Second 
Amendment and Gun Control. He will 
also examine the origins of the second 
amendment and analyzes the 
arguments, pro and con, of the contem- 
porary debate over gun control. Both 
topics will be open to discussion. 

The speaker graduated cum laude 
from Muhlenberg College in 1953 and 
received his M.A. in History and 
Political Science from the University of 
Rhode Island in 1955 and his Ph.D. in 
American History from Columbia 
University in 1968. His dissertation 
topic was "New York in Presidential 
Politics, 1789-1804." He has been Pro- 
fessor of History at West Chester 
University since 1965. 

Among Dr. Turner's current in- 
terests are the American Revolution, the 
U.S. Constitution, and violence in 
America. He is co-editor of Riot, Rout 
and Tumult: Readings in American 
Social and Political Violence, published 
by Greenwood Press in 1978. He is cur- 
rently editing A Documentary History 
of the Twelfth Amendment and The Se- 
cond Amendment and Gun Control. 

He sits on the Board of Directors 
of the Chester County Historical Socie- 
ty. He belongs to numerous profes- 
sional, academic and civic groups in- 
cluding the Oral History Association, 
the American Historical Association, 
and American Civil Liberties Union and 
the NAACP. 

Five persons are scheduled to speak 
at the College in the course of the lec- 
ture series, Mrs. Fremiotti said. 

For more information, contact the 
College Activities Office at College Ext. 
412. 



■SPOTUCHIPMoniliy. Jinoiry M IMSdTj 



JOE MIGNANO'S SUB SHOP 

CORNER OF 2nd & MAYNARD 

PHONE 323-7443 

One Block from W.A.C.C. 



Daily Specials 



Monday Regular Sub 
Tuesday Meatball 
Wednesday Turkey 
Thursday Ham 
Friday Tuna 
Saturday Cheese Steak 



Whole $1.60 
Whole $1.75 
Whole $1.40 
Whole $1.80 
Whole $1.70 
Whole $2.50 



Plans for College to have advisement center 

Plans are in the works for the formal implementation of the College's Advise- 
ment Center, according to Lawrence W. Emery Jr., director of counseling, career 
development and placement. 

A committee is now reviewing the findings of the Advisement Center "experi- 
ment" held last November, in which about 150 students took part. 

The center is a concept in which students who are enrolled for the coming 
semester come to the College for one dav and receive DlTcment ic^tine. scheduling, 
and financial aid advisement, It provides improved service to students. 

Emery said the concept has been "very positive" and the tentative date for im- 
plementation is mid-March. 

The proposal includes money to pay specially assigned faculty-15 or 16, one 
or two from each division- to work on initial special advising for the students, and 
administering and scoring placement tests of math, reading and English composi- 
tion in the same day. 

Emery noted that the highest amount of academic advisement will be concen- 
trated on "high risk" students, those who have at least two deficiencies in their 
placement test scores or are scheduled to take at least two developmental College 
courses. 

The advisement would continue throughout the developmental courses, and 
the assigned adviser would press the students to take responsibility for succeeding in 
the course, Emery stated. 

The final outcome of the center is to increase the ability to attract, advise and 
retain students and to attract students to the opportunity of career planning and 
how it can fit into the College's curriculums. 

The committee to study this more "personalized approach" includes R. Dean 
Foster, director of developmental studies and chairperson, Chester D. Schuman, 
director of admissions, Emery, and various directors of other offices and student 
services. 

The committee plans to submit their proposal to Dr. Robert G. Bowers, ex- 
ecutive assistant to the president, for Dr. Robert L. Breuder's approval. 

On the same matter, Emery is coordinating the development of an academic 
advisement handbook, with the purpose in mind to improve the College's advising 
methods. 



Club Briefs 



Hours: Mon.-Sat. II a.m. lo 9 p.m. Closed Sun. 



SGA adopts 

Good Neighbor policy 

According to Steven D. Metzker, a 
business management student from 
Williamsport and Student Government 
Association president, the SGA has 
adopted the Good Neighbor Policy, 
asking students to establish a good rela- 
tionship between the students and the 
community. 

The SGA is asking students to 
think of their neighbors in the 
Williamsport community and treat them 
with the same respect they use in their 
own community. 

PBL to sponsor dance 
at Quality Inn, Feb. 14 

Phi Beta Lambda (PBL) will spon- 
sor a Valentine's Day dance at the 
Quality Inn, Route 15, Williamsport on 
Feb. 14 at 7;30 p.m., according to 
David E. Davenport Jr., business 
management student of South 
Wilhamsport. 

It was originally reported that the 
dance would be held at the Sheraton; 
however, Davenport reported that it has 
been "all booked up." 

Ronald J. Wright, broadcasting 
student of Williamsport will be playing 
Top 40 music. 

A box of candy will be raffied off, 
and the winner will receive the prize the 
night of the dance, according to 
Jonathan F. Miller, a computer science 
student of Williamsport and club presi- 
dent. Tickets will be available in the 
PBL office, Room 3, Academic Center. 



SGA senate adopts 
new priorities at meeting 

The Student Government Associa- 
tion's Senate met on Jan. 22 and the 
following SGA priorities were adopted: 
-To develop the constitution and 
bylaws into a formal document and 
have it approved and implemented. 
-To develop the SGA's 1985-86 budget 
and have active participation in the 
development of the College Activities 
budget. 

-To perpetuate the SGA through the 
guidelines stated in the constitution. 
-To provide a clear line of communica- 
tion on a college-wide basis. 
-To provide leadership and support lo 
students and student organizations. 

The information was provided by 
Steven D. Metzker, a business manage- 
ment student from Williamsport and 
SGA president. 

PBL booksale over 
pick up checks; books 

All students who participated 
in the Phi Beta Lambda (PBL) 
book sale are reminded lo pick up 
books and checks, since the sale is 
over, according lo Jonathan F. 
Miller, computer science student 
of Williamsport and PBL presi- 
dent. 

Miller also noted that a 
general meeting will be held 
tomorrow, Jan. 29, at 3:30 p.m. 
in Room 329, Academic Center 
for all members and interested 
students. 



■8nSPOTLIGHTDMoiil«j, tmtry 28, 1M5! 



CAMPUS ACTIVITIES 

For the week of Monday, Jan. 28 through Sunday, Feb. 3 
MOVIE 

"Christine". ..7:30 this evening, Academic Center Auditorium, SI admission 
with validated College ID, %1 admission for all others. 

ACTIVITIES 

Downhill Skiing... S p.m. to midnight, this Wednesday, Jan. 30, at Ski 
Sawmill, Morris, sponsored by College Activities. 

Tobogganing... 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., this Sunday, Feb. 3, at Eagles Mere, free 
admission to students, faculty, and staff with ticket and validated ID. Sign-up in 
Room AI37, Lifelong Education Center and pick up ticket; sponsored by College 
Activities. 



MEETINGS 

Narcotics Anonymous...? p.m., this Wednesday, Jan. 30, Room 118, 
Building Trades Center. 

Student Government Association... Executive Committee, 4 p.m. tomorrow, 
Jan. 29, Room B107, Lifelong Education Center. 

Alpha Omega... 7 p.m., tomorrow, Jan. 29, Room 132, Academic Center. 

Circle K... Inter-club meeting with Lycoming's Circle K, 7 p.m. tonight, Jan. 
28, Wert Student Center, second floor, Lycoming College. 

SPECIAL EVENTS 

Speaker... 8 p.m. tomorrow, Jan. 29, Academic Center Auditorium, Dr. John 
J. Turner Jr., speaking on the Second Amendment and gun control; sponsored by 
the Special Events Committee. 

Quintet... 4 p.m., this Sunday, Feb. 3, Academic Center Auditorium, The 
Metropolitan Brass Quintet; sponsored by the Special Events Committee. 

SPORTS 



Basketball... 8 p.m., this evening, against PSU Schuylkill campus, away. 

Basketball...? p.m., tomorrow, Jan. 29, against Lock Haven University (JV), 
home. 

Basketball... 8 p.m., this Wednesday, Jan. 30, against Luzerne County Com- 
munity College, away. 

Basketball... 8 p.m., this Saturday, Feb. 2, against Delaware County Com- 
munity College, away. 



You Can Help Conserve 

Our Natural Resources 

...turn off lights when room is not in 

use... use only the water you need; 

don't leave it running... 



BENSON 



€Iffl mini, ^ 
§9Mn market 



Cornel of 3rd and Maynard Sts 



Always Open: 
All Night 
Sundays 
and Holidays 




JOB OPENINGS 

lr\formalion was provided by Lawrence W. Emery, director of counseling, 
career development and placement. For more information on the following job 
openings, Emery may be contacted at College Ext. 246. 

The Placement Office has received applications and a listing of summer jobs 
with the federal government. These jobs are mostly in the Washington and Pitt- 
sburgh areas. 

Also, a notice of seasonal/summer jobs in Pennsylvania state parks for skilled 
and unskilled laborers, custodial (maintenance and janitorial) workers, clerks and 
clerk typists, park rangers, environmental interpretation guides and lifeguards an- 
nouncements. For more details, applications and the announcement, contact Pa. 
Department of Environmental Resources, Bureau of Personnel, P.O. Box 2357, 
Harrisburg, Pa. 17120, Phone (71?) 787-8737, Monday-Friday, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. 
Also each state park has a supply of announcements and applications. 

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Tioga-Hammond and Cowanesque Lakes 
Projects in Tioga County, is currently recruiting Park Aids for the 1985 summer 
recreation season. Stop by the Placement Office for more information. 

Permanent for '85 graduates 

James Craft & Son Inc., Mechanical Contractors, York Haven, PA 17370 is 
interested in receiving resumes from Air Conditioning/Refrigeration, Accounting, 
Engineering Drafting-Technology and Plumbing and Heating students or you may 
contact James L. Nouse at (717) 266-6629 for an interview at their office. 

The U.S. Department of State is recruiting individuals for clerical positions 
and foreign service secretaries. More information is available in the Placement Of- 
fice. 

Campus Recruiting 

ChemLawn Corporation, Warminster, PA campus recruiting on January 29 
has been cancelled because of lack of interest. 

Le Jeune Chef Menus for lunch, dinner given 



Le Jeune Chef will be open for 
lunch every Tuesday, Thursday and Fri- 
day, 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. in the Lifelong 
Education Center (IMC). 

The menus are: 

Tuesday, January 29 

Chicken Velvet Soup. Chop Suey 
on Rice, Winter Mix or Green Bean 
with Mushrooms. Waldorf Salad. 
Raisin Nut Muffins, Beverage, butter. 

Butterscotch Squares. 

Star Burst Cake/Ice Cream 
Frosting. 

Thursday, January 31 

Com Chowder Soup. Breaded 
Pork Chops on Noodles Romanoff, 
Buttered Brussel Sprout, or Buttered 
Peas and Carrots, Banana Nut Bread 
Beverage, Applesauce Cake/Caramel Ic- 
ing and Chocolate Rolls. 

Due to budgetary cuts, the College 
deleted wrestling, women's basketball, 
field hockey, and cheerleading from the 
sports schedule for the 1984 academic 
year. 



Friday, February 1 

Beef Barley Soup. Chicken Tetraz- 
zini, Parsley Buttered Carrots, or Corn 
O'Brien, Carrifruit Salad, Roll, 
Beverage, Cherry Walnut Squares and 
English Toffee Dessert. 

Le Jeune Chef will be open for din- 
ners every Monday, Wednesday and 
Thursday. 

Monday, January 28 
Shrimp Scampi or Broiled 
Chicken. 

Wednesday, January 30 
Louisiana cajun chicken 

Thursday, January 31 

Roast Top Round of Beef Au Jus. 

Some of the people who had foods 
named after them include: Samuel 
Benedict, (eggs benedict); Sylvester 
Graham, (graham cracker); Nellie 
Melba, (peach melba); and John Mon- 
tagu, 4th, Earl of Sandwich, 
(sandwich). 



CILLO'S COLLEGE CORNER 

We'll prepare your favorite Subs and Burgers the way 
you like them! 

Play LUCKY NUMBERS and win a half sub plus a medium 
drink. Four winners every week! 

Cillo's College Corner 

1 100 W. Third St.,Williamsport 

(Next to Academic Centerl Phone Ahead: 322-1321 {_. 

Hours: 7:30 a.m. to 6 p.m. 
Fri. 7:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. 




-SPECIAL EDITION— 



Students' opinions 




OTLIGHT 



...Page 2. 



Tuesday, Jinuary 29, 1985 • Vol. 20, No. 22 • 2 Ptpi 
WilUimiporl Area CommanUy Collegt • Williamsport, Pa. 17701 



Community's opinions 
...Page 2. 



College board of trustees issues response to school 
board president's sponsorship proposal 



(The following is the 
Board of Trustees' response to the 
sponsorship proposal made by Richard 
F. Eberhart, president of the 
Williamsport Area School Board, to 
area school representatives. The plan 
calls for the College to operate as a 
state technical school. Dr. Robert L. 
Breuder noted in a meeting last week 
thai he and the board do not agree with 
the proposal./ 

The Williamsport Area Community Col- 
lege Board of Trustees welcomes all discussions 
concerning the future of the College. The only 
group which has shared ideas and suggestions 
directly with the College has been the Area 
Conunission on College Sponsorship. This 
group was formed al Ihe request of the Board of 
Trustees in December and consists of local 
leaders from business, industry and government. 
As a next step, the Board of Trustees proposes 
that the Area Commission on College Sponsor- 
ship invites others who have recently discussed 



the College sponsorship issue to join together 
with that Commission to develop a mutually ac- 
ceptable alternative. 

As a governing body of the College and as 
individuals deeply concerned with this important 
community problem, the Board of Trustees 
beUeves that some statements in recent press ac- 
counts and other reports require clarification. 
However, the Board does agree with some of the 
assumptions and suggestions as we understand 
them. 

Specifically, the Board agrees that: 
-The College is a primary educational asset for 
fiiture community and statewide development. 
-Uninterrupted operation of the College is in 
the best interest of the community. 
-There is an immediate need for a transitional 
plan which can lead to long-term economic and 
operational stability for the College. 
-There needs to be a central sponsor. Multiple 
school district sponsorship has proven to be 
unrealistic and unworkable. County-based 
sponsorship has been found to be a viable alter- 
native. 
-The College Board of Trustees must represent 



the constituents served and must respond to 
local needs. 

-Local school districts' responsibility, 
kindergarten through 12th grade, does not in- 
clude the College's acknowledged poslsecondary 
mission. 

-The participation of Loyalsock and Muncy 
school districts is critical for county-based spon- 
sorship. 

-A revised plan of future College operation, 
sponsorship and governance requires 
cooperative support from all affected parties in 
order to gain necessary State approval. 

The Board of Trustees believes that several 
conclusions and recommendations as reported 
are predicated on inaccurate information. Some 
suggestions would bring unintended negative im- 
pact to the community. It is important that all 
parties be realistic concerning viable options. In 
particular, Ihe Board believes Ihal: 
-The Slate will not lake over College sponsor- 
ship and funding to solve a local problem. The 
State will not approve a new plan which could 
not be adopted by all other community colleges. 
Repeated contact with and information provided 



by State officials have confirmed this conclu- 
sion. 

Most recently (on the day following 
Lycoming County school board representatives 
and Commissioner Gene E. Smith's visit to 
Harrisburg). Dr. James Hunter, Commissioner 
on Higher Education, indicated to Pennsylvania 
community college presidents that the Com- 
monwealth will NOT take over The 
Williamsport Area Community College. The 
preliminary report of the Governor's Commis- 
sion on Financing Higher Education concludes, 
"The Slate maintains Ihe principle 
of uniform IreatmenI and Ihe preseni for- 
mula of one-lhird. one-lhird,' one-lhird 
(sharing cosis among Ihe Stale, Ihe local 
sponsor and the student) be continued. 
The State should not assume Ihe local 
sponsor share. To do so wllJ eilhtr re 
quire a substantial increase in Stale fun- 
ding or lower State support for institu- 
tions in other sectors. It would also 
lessen Ihe community-focus ofcommuni- 
naoPlease Urn u Page 2 



Dr. Breuder takes stand on retention of community college 



[The following are excerpts from a SPOTLIGHT interview with Dr. Robert 
L. Breuder, College president, concerning the recent sponsorship proposal made 
by Richard Eberhart, president of the Williamsport school board. 

The president answered questions concerning the proposal and its implica- 
tions.] 



Who are the members of the Area Commission on College Sponsorship? 

Mr. Jack T. Detwieler, vice president of Stroehmann Brothers Co. is chairper- 
son; Michael R. J. Felix, member of city council, is vice-chairman. Other members 
are Joseph V. Grieco, former general assemblyman from Jersey Shore; Birch B. 
Phillips, Phillips Supply House, Williamsport; Robert T. Manley, Pennsylvania 
Power & Light, Williamsport; Peyton D. McDonald, vice president, E. F. Hutton. 



Would the College lose its academic courses? 

There would not be much of a need for courses like English, chemistry, 
anatomy, physics, and psychology -- courses that business and industry will tell you 
quick enough that if they wanted to hire robots .... they would simply go out and 
get them to perform that task. This is not what business and industry- want. They 
want a person trained in a given technology but they want the individual to com- 
municate effectively, to be able to reason effectively, to be able to compute from a 
mathematical point of view. And industry is very much concerned with graduates of 
higher education who do not posess the basic skills to be successful in life, both per- 
sonally as well as professionally. The College therefore feels it has an obligation not 
only to give students a technical skill that they are looking for but also to give 
students other knowledge necessary to be successful in life. If you went to a 
technical institute, much of that would be removed from the college. 



In what ways do yon plan to inform the public of your position? 

I think the board of trustees has made known its position when it released its 
formal statement over the weekend, which we know was published almost in its en- 
tirety in the GRIT on Sunday. The board has no other course of action other than 
it is looking to the Area Commission on College Sponsorship to help resolve this 
problem. I think it is important to recognize that the sponsorship issue is not an 
issue that has materialized over the last 12 to 24 months. It has been in existence 
also since day one. It's only been recently that we have been willing to acknowledge 
the severity of the problem and people now know something must be done to cor- 
rect it. Since the school districts and the College working together without outside 
involvement have been unable to affect a mutual acceptable alternative the trustees 
are looking to the Area Commission on Sponsorship to not only research the pro- 
blem but to come forth with some reasonable, responsible, rational suggestions to 
alleviate the problem. 



If Ihe College did change to a technical institute, how many programs, divi- 
sions, faculty, and administration would be terminated? 

I think you would see a major adjustment in not only programs at the College 
and services but obviously staffing because in essence you would be narrowing the 
focus of the institution and whenever you do that, you obviously would be then tur- 
ning away students who would express interest in the given program that we pro- 
bably would not be able to offer under the technical institute unbrella. What some 
people would suggest to be a simple decision to go from a comprehensive communi- 
ty college to a technical institute ....would have an effect not only on studeiit 
population, programs and services, but obviously the staffing of the College. So it 
would be rather dramatic. 



IdSPOTLIGHTDTocmIi;. Jinniry 29, 1985 i 



'SPECIAL EDITION^ 



Positive response about College College board issues response 
according to recent Mall survey 



With the question of "Do you feel the College should return to a technical 
school as the school districts proposed or remain a community college as it is now?" 
12 area residents gave their responses during a random survey by two SPOTLIGHT 
members at the Lycoming Mall in Muncy over the weekend. 

The first couple, elderiy residents of South Williamsport, reasoned that they 
had no opinion on the current sponsorship issue and since they felt they were not 
directly involved, "it is better to say nothing if you don't know all the pros and 
cons." 

The next woman questioned, Lenna Bensinger, a clerk at Singer Sewing 
Center, from Montgomery, noted that she could accept a technical school, but "it 
would be nice to have it stay both ways. I have two boys, 9 and II, and if they 
don't go to a four year college, I would like them to have some kind of training, 
and WACC is right here." 

Another woman, Shirley O'Brian from Lewisburg RD, who was shopping at 
Hess' Department Store, stated, "I'm not very well versed on the subject, but I 
think it (the College) should stay the way it is." She added that her son attended 
the College in the aviation curriculum and now has a good job. 

Most of the other respondents voted for the College to remain in its current 
educational vein. Vicki Pavne, a clerk who lives in Williamsport, noted, "I think 
the College should keep having academics. It's a benefit to the community." The 
clerk also added that she was thmkmg about enrolling in the College over the last 
semester, but has decided to see the outcome of the sponsorship issue before mak- 
ing a decision. 

Tom Montgomery, a professional photographer/proof consultant from 
Williamsport, also echoed Miss Payne's sentiments concerning academics. A 
graduate of the College's journalism program, Montgomery stated, "Even though 
the technical field is important, especially in this area, I feel that academia is even 
more important." 

Another academic-oriented resident, Charlie Stahl, a meat cutter from 
Williamsport, wants the College to stay with its current programs because, "it's 
cheaper that way!" 

Brian Fagnano, a business management student from Williamsport who also 
works at Wee Three Records at the Mall, said the College should keep exoanding, 
also reasoning that the College is a benefit to the community and opens more doors 
for more people, and does not limit itself. 

A Monloursville car sales manager, Mike Callahan, also thought the College 
should stay the way it is, and pointed out that his wife had taken various College 
courses and loved the school, the education she received, and the instructors. He 
also relayed that his wife felt the College had as much to offer as Lycoming College, 
where she is now attending. 

Another Mall employee, Judy Babb, a resident of Muncy who works at the 
Hickory Farms shop, said, "Have it (the College) stay the way it is. It would be a 
shame if the College wouldn't be here anymore." 

The last man questioned, who is involved in a Williamsport construction 
business, also thought the College should stay the way it is, adding that the com- 
munity needs more variety that the College offers. The man, who asked not to be 
identified, also added that the College "goes overboard with expansion of the 
school, and the people in charge - from the top man down - want the most 
elaborate plan in the state. You don't need first class." 

He elaborated that most of the students are from rural communities and do 
not expect elaborateness anyway. 



Student responses 
on sponsorship 

Students want liberal arts 

/College students responded when asked if 
they jell the College should return to a technical 
institute as the Williamsport school board 
president proposed, or jf the College should 
stay the way it is, as the College wants. Among 
the responses are:/ 

"For most people, this College is a 
springboard to go into a four year 
school, (fit became a technical institute 
it would cut out all the liberal art pro- 
grams. I feel that this College should 
stay definitely the way it is..." Michael 
K. Reibsome, advertising art student 
from Bloomsburg. 



'Wo, / Ihink It would be better if it 
stayed the nay it is. It is a guod schout 
we have here, ft would be bad if all 
liberal art programs are cut out, 
especially for the curriculum I'm in. 
These courses are very vital for me..." 
Thomas E. Worth, advertising art stu- 
dent from Linden. 

"If they revert back to the 
trade/technical format they would be 
regressing instead of evolving and caus- 
ing the students to lose out on their 
education opportunities. It would also 
be a direct regression for the College 
opportunity for enrollments, credibili- 
ty, status, and also the cultural as well 
as financial benefits for both the Col- 
lege AND community..." Glenn C. 
Shaffer, a business management student 
from Monloursville. 



Conunuei JTom Page /DDD 

ty colleges, which are now very respon- 
sive to local needs and priorities. " 
-The current agreemeni between the College 
and the 20 sponsor districts continues until all 
outstanding bond issues are paid (1999) or until 
the Slate Board of Higher Education approves 
an alternative. Mutual support by all parties in- 
volved will be needed to release any current 
sponsors and to move to a new sponsorship 
framework. 

-The proposed change to a state technical in- 
stitute funded by a fixed state subsidy and stu- 
dent tuition would impose excessively heavy tui- 
tion on students. An education would become 
inaccessible for many of the 31.5 percent of the 
current students coming from families with in- 
comes under SIS.OOO or for the 85 percent of 
current students needing financial aid to attend. 
Pennsylvania community college students 
already pay the second highest community col- 
lege tuition rate nationwide. 
-The College does not have six million dollars 
in reserve which can be used to reduce fees to 
sponsors. The College did not make a $1.6 
miUion "profit" last year. The College does 
maintain S900,000 (5.39 percent of the 
operating and capital budget) in reserve to cover 
contingencies per Board policy. 
-College sponsors do not "pay all the bills." In 
fact, all 20 sponsors from ten counties pay only 
16 percent of annual operating and 10 percent 
of capital expenses. Lycoming County sponsors 
pay only 8.5 percent of budget expenses; that is, 
91.5 percent of the College's funding comes 
from oUier sources. 

-The present framework for Board of Trustees 
membership already provides adequate accoun- 
tability to the districts. All Board members were 
approved by a two-thirds vote of the sponsors. 
Two-lhiids of the current Board members are 
former school board members. 
-A shift to a state technical institute requires 
legislative action, would surrender local control 
and restrict the College's ability to meet local 
needs. 

-Preserving the College's comprehensive mis- 
sion will best serve the community. Although 
the College emphasizes technical education, it 
serves a broader constituency through non- 
credit community service programming, 
business and industry training and upgrading, 
traditional arts and sciences, business and other 
coursework transferrable lo four-year institu- 
tions. These opportunities would be inaccessible 
to many if not offered at the College. Going 
back to the past, the limited vision of a technical 
institute, is not a progressive means of serving 
the emerging needs of our desipated lO-county 
service area. 

-The College's continuing enrollmeni oowth, 
currently unique in Pennsylvania, indicates 
quality service lo the community consistent with 

"iVhat would the students or the com- 
munity gain if it went back to being a 
technical institute besides saving 
money? This College is a very good 
idea. I talked to other students that 
transferred here from other colleges 
and they really like it here. I don't 
think it should turn back. We would 
lose a lot more then we would gain..." 
Charies D. Hood, advertising art stu- 
dent from Watsonlown. 



our mission. This growth is the product of in- 
structional exceUence. appropriate new offer- 
ings, and the College's commitment to state-of- 
the-art technology. The proposal would severely 
Umit such initiatives. 

The Board of Trustees has actively been 
pursuing a solution. Members of the Board 
have: 

-Invited any school district interested in explor- 
ing alternatives to work with the College. 
-Encouraged local business, industry and com- 
munity leaders to form an Area Commission on 
College Sponsorship to work toward resolution 
of the problem. 

-Actively supported legislation for variable pro- 
gram subsidies to community colleges. This 
legislation could result in a very significant 
reduction in the local sponsor's required con- 
tribution. 

-Recognized the impact of budget increases on 
sponsor districts and students, (yia the past 
three years the total per-student increase to 
sponsor districts has been held to only 5.4 per- 
cent. 

-Pursued and accomplished critically needed 
equipment and facility changes through 
federal/stale/private sector funding. County 
sponsor districts have contributed 1 .4 percent of 
the $22.6 milUon in College construction and 
renovation completed since 1977 and 2.3 per- 
cent of the $5 million expended for instructional 
equipment over the past three years. These ex- 
penditures have occurred without any bonded 
indebtedness to the sponsors. 
-Researched a variety of appropriate funding 
patterns for community colleges throughout the 
country and proposed a comprehensive County 
, sponsorship plan predicated on this research. 
-Met with State legislative delegations, school 
board officials, Department of Education 
leaders, and interested community residents to 
identify a workable, fair solution lo the sponsor- 
ship problem. 

-Reaffinned that the College will be open and 
fully operational July I, 1985. 

The Board believes that a solution should 
never be based on calls for power or control. 
The Board recognizes that an objective, 
workable solution must address the concerns 
and needs of students, local citizens, area 
business and industry, school districts. County 
Government, and the accrediting board. In the 
spirit of cooperation, the Board of Trustees re- 
quests that the Area Commission on College 
Sponsorship contact school districts, the County 
Commissioners, and leaders of business and in- 
dustry to create a task force to develop a pro- 
posal for revised sponsorship which can be 
presented to the Stale Board of Higher Educa- 
tion with the support of all present sponsors, the 
proposed fiiture sponsors, and the College 
Board of Trustees. 



"I feel it should stay the way it is. I 
think it is a very good school as it is, 
especially for kids that can't qfford a 
four year college. This College has 
made a very good name for itself ir. this 
state and it is well recommended by 
high schools and also by people who 
graduated from here..." Merritt M. 
Mc Carter, business management stu- 
dent from Monloursville. 




TLIGHT 



Mondiy, Febniinr 4, 1985 • Vol. 20. No. 23 • 8 Pago 
Williimsporl Area Commoiiil; Colltte • Williimsport, Pi. 17701 




Judge abides by Act 



APPROXIMATELY 30 STUDENTS attended the lecture on "Second 
Amendment and Gon Control" last Tuesda; night in the Academic Center 
Auditorium, according to Mrs. JoAnn R. Fremiotti, coordinator of intramaral 
athletics and College activities. The coordinator considered the lecture, spon- 
sored by Special Events Committee, well-attended. IPhoto by Richard E. Kopp 
Jr.l 

New officers; board members seated 



New officers were inducted and 
new board members seated when the 
College Foundation, Inc. held its an- 
nual re-organizational meeting on 
Wednesday, Jan. 23 at the Sheraton in 
downtown Williamsport. 

Peyton D. McDonald, vice 
president/manager of E.F. Hutton and 
Company of Williamsport, succeeds 
William Pickelner, president of 
Pickelner Fuel Oil Company of 
Williamsport, as president of the foun- 
dation. Taking the office of vice- 
president was William D. Davis, presi- 
dent of Commonwealth Bank and I rust 
Company, Williamsport. James E. 
Short, president of Jesco Athletic Com- 

Board of Trustees 
will meet tonight 

The monthly meeting of the Board 
of Trustees of the College will be tonight 
at 8 p.m. in the Lifelong Education 
Center, second floor. The meeting of 
the board follows a regular agenda. 

Visitors have an opportunity to 
make statements to the Board, and re- 
quests requiring a decision by the Board 
will be placed on a fiiture agenda. 

Action items to be discussed at the 
meeting are the approval of bids for 
cylindrical grinders, four tool room 
lathes, student industrial electronic kits 
and surface grinders. 

After the meeting, Dr. Robert L. 
Breuder, College president, will conduct 
a tour of the new Word Processing Lab 
and the area which will house Graphic 
Arts and Duplicating and Mail Services. 



Students win sponsorship suit 



pany, Wilhamsport, was re-elected 
secretary. Treasurer, 

Newly-elected to the Board were 
Charline M. Waltman, president of 
Labels By Pulizzi, Inc. of Williamsport; 
V. Judd Rodgers, general manager of 
the Sunday Grit, Grit Publishing Com- 
pany of Williamsport; and Donald G. 
Holtzman, general manager of Stone 
Container Corporation, Wilhamsport. 

Robert T. Manley, economic 
development and community relations, 
Pennsylvania Power and Light Com- 
pany, who has served on the Board 
since September, 1984 was formally in- 
stalled. 

Already serving on the Board are 
George V. Cohen, attorney of 
•Williamsport; James H. Crossley, Cer- 
tified Public Accountant, The Hart 
Building, Williamsport; William 
McLean, general manager, Grumman 
Alhed Industries, Inc., Montgomery; 
David M. Miele, owner of Hillside 
Restaurant, Montoursville RD 3; 
Frederic Plankenhoni of Plankenhom 
Stationery Company, Williamsport; 
John A. Schultz, president of Jersey 
Shore Steel company. South Avis; Allen 
E. Ertel, attorney of Montoursville; J. 
Paul Martin, president of Lycoming 
Silica Sand company, division of Kop- 
pers Corporation, Montoursville RD I; 
John B. McMurtrie, president of Nor- 
thern Central Bank of Williamsport; 
John Savoy, president of John Savoy & 
Son, Inc. of Montoursville; Matthew T. 
Gibbs, president of Gibbs Pontiac- 
Buick, Hughesville; Jack Minnier, com- 
munications systems consultant for 
AT&T, Williamsport; Theodore H. 
Reich, president, Jersey Shore State 
■■■ Please turn lo Page 4 



Judge Thomas C. Raup ruled Fri- 
day that school districts cannot limit to 
four semesters, the one-third tuition 
subsidized for district-sponsored 
students. The class action suit was 
against the Williamsport and South 
Williamsport Area School Districts. 
Judge Raup gave the students involved 
in the suit the right to sue for reimburse- 
ment of their money. 

Plaintiffs: limits illegal 

The plaintiffs in the suit were Terry 
Hasselman of 309 Eldred St. 
Williamsport and Sharon L. Faust of 
South Williamsport, who claimed the 
four-semester tuition limit appUed by 
the State was illegal under the State's 
Community College Act. 

Act: withoot limit 

The Community College Act con- 
tains a provision which states each 
school district shall sponsor a post- 
secondary or college level student 
without limitation as long as the student 
is a resident of Pennsylvania and has 
lived in the school district for one year. 

The school districts contend the 
State's Community College Act intends 
such schools lo be economical two year 
colleges, and the sponsoring school 
districts are not required to continue to 
pay for a student's education past the 
four-semester period. The school 
districts argue that they would be finan- 
cing the students' education for 10 to 20 
years. 

Breuder: student situations 

Dr. Robert L. Breuder, College 
president, said that local school districts 
are putting Umits to restrict sponsorship 



and this is against the law and that the 
College agrees with the law suit. Dr. 
Breuder said that most people attending 
the College complete their education in 
four semesters. However, there are 
situations where a student needs to at- 
tend the College longer. For mstance, 
some students do not have the skills to 
do college level work even after gradua- 
tion from high school. These students 
can extend their education by as much 
as a year to take extra classes. He also 
added that some students change their 
major and must continue beyond the 
average two-year period. 

Dr. Breuder also stated some peo- 
ple come back to the College to take 
refresher courses and retraining courses 
because of changes in their profession. 

The one issue won by the school 
districts was that Judge Raup refused to 
award the students their attorney fees. 

The school districts had not com- 
pletely reviewed the court's decision, 
but it is expected that an appeal may be 
filed within 20 days. 



l Budget deadline today 

I Today is the deadhne for stu- 
i dent organization requests for the 
j>' College Activities Budget for 
*• 1985-86, according to Mrs. JoAnn 
* R. Fremiotti, coordinator of in- 
!« tramural athletics and College ac- 
? tivities. 

I Mrs. Fremiotti has proper 
f forms available In her office. 
Room 108, Bardo Gym and she 
I may be contacted at College Ext. 
! 269. 



Inside this issue: 



New weekly column Page 7 

Valentine's Day dance details Page 5 

Health Quiz Page 5 



laSPOTLIGHTDMoDdt;. Ftkrsir; 4, I9SS 



CommentarynLettersnReviews 



Have you eaten today? 



Sometime around noon today, 
nearly every person on this campus 
will have one pervading thought, 
"Where are we going to eat lunch?" 

"Should we consume the cafeteria 
tare or fatten our bellies on the line 
cuisine of Le Jeune Chef? Maybe we 
should send out for Domino's or munch 
a Wendy's triple," 

While many of us try to decide 
what to eat. people just a plane ride 
away are wondering IF they will eat. 
When they will eat. How long they will 
hang on to life. 

One million people have starved 
to death on the barren plains of 
Ethiopia. 

When we look ahead to life 
beyond the classroom, we see the 
right Job, the perfect love, the Idyllic 
future. 

Those suffering In Africa have.no 
future. Their concern is receiving the 

Spend tax 
dollars wisely 

Every four years, citizens of the 
United States are accustomed to in- 
auguration ceremonies In January. 
The issue here Is not the ceremony 
itself, but the high costs placed on tax- 
payers to "foot the bills." Is It all thai 
necessary to spend 12 million dollars 
on gala events tor the president and his 
administration while people are 
homeless, hungry and living in the 
streets? 

A president should receive a cer- 
tain amount of honor, but unwise spen- 
ding of large amounts of money is 
ridiculous. After all, this is a democratic 
society, not a Hollywood extravagan- 
za Good money is being wasted on a 
selected few, so they can "have a 
good time " while Innocent people are 
being deprived. 

The president and his administra- 
tion should open their eyes to the peo- 
ple scrounging to survive. The people 
living in the gutters, and the ones who 
are panic-stricken because they don't 
know where their next meal is coming 
from are the ones being affected. 

Also, should we be penalized so 
that political officials can enjoy the 
"good life"? It is a clear case of in- 
justice. 

One suggestion to change this im- 
balance of power is to cut down on un- 
necessary spending. Put the money to 
good use and help get these homeless 
people off the streets. More govern- 
ment aid programs need to be organiz- 
ed to help these people. 

Government needs to scale down 
all the elaborate pomp and cir- 
cumstance and donate the money for 
programs for the poor. 

It is definitely an idea to be con- 
sidered, analyzed and put into prac- 
tice. 



sustenance to keep going another day. 
Many young children in Ethiopia have 
eaten so seldom they have actually 
forgotten how to chew and swallow 
food 

Starvation is a horrible way to die. 
The physical discomfort of being 
hungry is just the beginning. 

Psychologically, food becomes 
the body becomes lethargic, making 
any movement a monumental chore. 
The senses become dull; the libido 
ceases Its drive. As the body 
becomes, weaker, so does the will to 
live. 

When you eat lunch today, with 
your belly hanging out over your belt, 
consider how much you have, how for- 
tunate you are, what a prosperous 
country you are privileged to live in. 

For the price of a pizza and a 
drink, a child in Afhca can eat for a 
month. 

New horror flick is 
"fascinating, sicl(" 

Movie Review by Donna M. Bernett 

Wes Craven's Nightmare On 
Elm Street looks like your typical 
blood and gore movie (or as my 
father calls It, a "spook show"), 
but surprisingly this horror movie 
has a story to go along with all 
the eerie effects. 

The beginning is confusing, 
but that is what maintains in- 
terest. Tina, a typical high school 
girl begins to have recurring 
nightmares about a rotting corp- 
se who wears a round black 
vaudeville hat and has 10 swit- 
chblades for fingernails. It con- 
stantly chases her, screeching 
its bladed fingernails along metal 
pipes for effect. 

Her best friend, Nancy, 
becomes alarmed when she, too, 
dreams about the same 
gruesome figure, and becomes 
even more alarmed when Tina 
dies in her sleep from the deadly 
knives. 

When Tina's leather- 
jacketed boyfriend is jailed on 
suspicion of her murder, Nancy 
sets out to bring the killer corpse 
out of her dreams, thereby prov- 
ing Tina's boyfriend's innocence. 

The way Nancy goes about 
bringing the killer out of her 
dreams, trapping and finally kill- 
ing him is ingenious. The ending 
is the best part, although I per- 
sonally hate those types of en- 
dings. It kept me on the edge of 
my seat, mumbling to the girl on 
the screen, "No, don't go that 
way..." "He's under the bed..." 
"No, don't fail asleep. .". 

But is he really dead? It's a 
fascinating, sick movie. ..don't 
miss it. 



People will do 
anything for $$ 

TV Review by Wanna F. Brown 

With the bombardment of game 
shows ranging from the tolerable to the 
idiotic, the television networks must br- 
ing back the old standbys like "Jeopar- 
dy" and "Name That Tune". Amongst 
the pile is the show called "Anything 
for Money", airing on weeknights at 
7:30 p.m. on WBRE-TV Channel 28. 
The show is hosted by Fred Travelina. 

The show consists of three rounds 
where the contestants, usually two, try 
to predict if people will get themselves 
in certain situations and how much 
money it would take to put them in 
those situations. The contestants must 
see how much they know about human 
nature. For instance, would you get in- 
to a cage with a gorilla and sing a 
lullaby to calm It down? Or let a total 
stranger wrap you up like a mummy for 
his presentation for fifteen minutes? Or 
would you dance with a skeleton in 
public and talk and dance with It as if it 
were alive? 

People do if they are paid enough. 
Where are the morals of these people? 
This show fits the title. 



The Rose 

/Editor's Note: This poe/tt was submit- 
ted hy Miss Theresa Lenhard of 
Shamoliin Dam. Miss Lenhard's father, 
James E. Lenhard, is art accounting stu- 
dent at the Cotlege.J 
A splerxlid rose stood all alone 
Surrounded by a walk ol stone 
Around the wall were roses, too 
Still neither knew the other grew 
So often we, like flowers dwell 
Too deep within our human shell 
And pass through life "not "not 

understood" 

Nor making all the friends we 

should. 



Rush: Strong lyrics 
with futuristic themes 

Mualc Review by LeRoy S. Whltmlre 

Grace Under Pressure, Rush's latest 
LP has all the elements of a true Rush 
album. Apocalyptic lyrics, high pitched 
vocals and highly synthesized material 
are methods used to create the unique 
Rush sound. 

The members of the Canadian 
power trio are Geddy Lee, Alex 
Lifeson, and Neil Peart, Rush formed in 
1969, and in 1974 they recorded their 
first album. Since then. Rush has 
recorded 1 2 albums of which seven 
went gold, and more than likely, Grace 
Under Pressure will follow suit. 

Rush's lyrics, provided by Neil 
Peart (also known as professor of the 
drum cage) are the strong point of Grace 
Under Pressure. Side one begins with 
"Distant Early Warning" providing a 
message which is all too clear about 
the acid rain dilemma and nuclear 
weapons. Another track, "Body Elec- 
tric," begins: "One humanoid 
escapee/one android on the run/seek- 
ing freedom beneath a lonely desert 
sun/trying to change its program/trying 
to change the mode/crack the 
code/Images conflicting into data 
overload." 

"Body Electric's" science fiction 
theme is another trademark of Peart's 
lyrics. 

Cartoons, letters to the 
editor, and other 
commentary-type material 
for publication may be sub- 
mitted to the editorial page 
editor of the Spotlight, at 
Room 7 of the Academic 
Center, by noon Tuesday 
before the next date of 
publication. 



SPOTLIGHT 
Monday, February 4, IQSS - Vol. 20, No. 23 

Ttie SPOTLIGHT is published eacti Iwlonday morning of the academic year, ex- 
cept lor Coilege vacations, by journalism and other interested students of The 
Wiiliamsporl Area Community College 

Office: Room 7. Academic Center. 1005 W Third St.. Wiiliamsporl. Pa. 
17701 Telephone: (717) 326-3761. Extension 221 



Opinions expressed are those of the student newspaper or of those whose 
mes accompany items Opinions do not reflect official opinion of the Institution, 



THE STAFF 

Karen M f^elarko. Managing Editor, James K fi/lorhssey. Milonal Page Ed/lor. 
Richard E Kopp Jr. Photography Editor: Donna M Barnett. Darkroom Technician; 
Kalhryn f^, Gllbert.Adminisfrafive Affairs Editor. Wanna F, Brown. Student Affairs 
Editor; Sandra R. Taylor, Advertising Manager; Anne T, N/toratelli, Advertising Assis- 
tant; Kathleen L Eismert. Sports Editor. Gisela Grassley, Production Supervisor 
Rodney D Hill. Mark S Schwanke. Senior Staff Writers 

REPORTERSISTAFF ASSOCIATES 

Cynthia E, A, Hartranft, Kelly S Herroid. Sandra L Musgrave. Judith L. 
Swinehart, Jennifer S White. LeRoy S Whitmire Jr 
Jonathan J Kolesar, office manager 
Faculty adviser: Anthony N Ciilo 
Acting adviser, Mrs Louise H, Sweeney 



Production Staff This Issue 

Karen M fi^elarko. production supervisor. Richard E Kopp Jr.. copy editor; Donna M. 
Barnett, videocomposition, and Cynthia E A Hartranft, production assistant 



Smith, Kaufman 
leading scorers 

Freshmen Mark Smith and Bill 
Kaufman were leading scorers in th? 
Wildcats' 70-54 victory over PSl' 
Schuylkill last Monday, according to 
Harry C. Secht, assistant professor, 
physical education. 

Trailing behind with 14 points was 
freshman Dave Durham. 

The Wildcats had an easy lead 
through the first half that continued 
through the the rest of the game. 

The win pushed the Wildcats' 
record up 5-9. 

Wildcats defeated 

"Their bench was stronger than 
ours," said Harry C. Specht, assistant 
nrnfessor of ohvsical education, reflec- 
ting on the Wildcats' 44-50 loss to to 
Philadelphia Community College last 
Friday. 

However, "we were verv com- 
petitive with them," he commented. 
"At half-time Philly was only up by 
nine points." Compared to other 
games, he said, "they are sometimes 
leading by 30 points." 

Leading scorer for the Wildcats 
was freshman Bill Kaufman with a total 
of 20 points. 

Specht attributes the loss as with 
other losses to the teams in the fon- 
ference. "Our league has extremely 
good teams," he said and added "our 
conference record is not a good indica- 
tion of the team." In his opinion, the 
team seems to do "well when we play 
games outside of our conference," he 
said. 

Away from the Wildcats con- 
ference, they have defeated Baptist Bible 
College, Lycoming College and 
Schuykill Campus of the Pennsylvania 
State University. 



SPOTUGHTDMondiy, Febrairj 4. I985d3 




SPORTS--For schedules, see page 4. 

Strikes-Scumbuzzards hold first 

As of this week. Lucky Strikes and the Scumbuzzards are tied for first place 
with a 7-2 record in WACC's intramural bowling league. Other team standings are 
as follows: 

Pin Busters, 5-4; Defenders of the Faith, 5-4; the Outlaws, 4-5; Two plus One, 
4-5; Dew Crew 2-7; Twilight Zone, 2-7. 

High Team Series: Scumbuzzards, 1914; Pinbusters, 1860; Lucky Strikes 
1784. 

High Mens Series: Rudy Long 568; Bryan Valentine, 548; Mark 
Reamsnyder, 547. 

High Womens Series: Denise McNeil, 417. 

High Team Single: Pinbusters, 686; Scumbuzzards, 674; Defenders of the 
Faith, 645. 

High Men's Single: Rich Jackson, 208; Rudy Long, 205; Bryan Valen- 
tine, 201. 

High Women's Single: Denise McNeil, 146. 

Top five averages: Mark Reamsnyder, 206; Bryan Valentine, 180; Paul 
Maserick, 177; Scott Kehns, 171; George Ponchione, 170. 

Wrestling, weight training clinics to be held 

All students who have signed up for the wrestling tournaments are reminded 
that wrestling clinics will be held from 7 to 10 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 12 in the gym, 
according to David A. Golfieri, evening activities assistant. 

Golfieri stressed that this chnic must be attended by all individuals who plan to 
wrestle in the tournament. 

All rules and regulations will be explained at the chnic. Participants should ar- 
rive, dressed in the appropriate gear and have a pencil, according to Golfieri. 

A beginner's weight training clinic will be held this evening from 4 to 6 p.m. in 
the weight room of the gym, according to David A. Golfieri, evening activities assis- 
tant. 

The clinic will cover exercise technique, injuries and safety in addition to 
weight training programs tailored to meet individual needs, according to Golfieri. 

Those presently involved in a weight training program who are interested in ex- 
panding their knowledge of nutrition, drugs and misconceptions in the worid of 
weight training may attend an advanced weight training clinic to be held from 6 to 8 
p.m. Wednesday. 

Both cUnics are open to any student, faculty or staff members. 

Further information is available in Room 108 of the gym or by calling Ext. 
412. 

The weight room will be open from 6 to 10 p.m. this evening, from 4 to 10 
p.m. Tuesday, from 8 to 10 p.m. Wednesday and from 4 to 10 p.m. Thursday. 



' IM Basketball learns in action.. 



!^^ »L%E^ 




AS OTHER IN- 
TRAMURAL participants \ovk on, (he 
ball is aboal lo be slammed across the 
net. IPhoto by Richard E. Kopp Jr.j 

Pool tourney 
to be held 

Any students, faculty or staff in- 
terested in a pool tournament should 
sign-up in Room A137 Recreation 
Center office. Lifelong Education 
Center (LEC), according to David A. 
Golfieri, evening activities assistant. 

Playoffs are scheduled to begin the 
week of Feb. 11, and interested persons 
may practice "anytime on one's own," 
he said. 

According to Golfieri, "all com- 
petition will be individual and different 
divisions will be scheduled." 

Deadline for sign-ups is 4 p.m. on 
Feb. 5. 

A copy of the playing schedules 
and rules may then be picked up in the 
Recreation Center office on Friday, 
Feb. 8. 

Ski lessons are available 

Students interested in learning to ski should sign-up in the Recreation Center 
office. Lifelong Education Center (LEC), for begining cross-country skiing clinic 
that are still being held, according to David A. Golfieri, evening activities assistant. 

The clinics will be held from 8:30 to 11:30 a.m. on Saturday, Feb. 2 and from 
3 to 7 p.m. on Tuesday, Feb. 5 at the White Deer Golf Course. 

Ski rental for the first hour is $2.50, $1.50 for the second hour and $5 if over 
two hours. Transportation will be provided and will depart from the Learning 
Resources Center (LRC) bus loop. 

Downhill skiing trips to Ski Sawmill, Morris, are also bemg offered from 5 
p.m. to 12 a.m. on Wednesday, Feb. 6, Wednesday, Feb. 13 and Wednesday, Feb. 
27. 

Ski lessons will be provided at 2:30 p.m. with a cost of $5. Lift tickets are $5 
from 5 to 10 p.m. Ski rentals are $7 from 5 to 10 p.m. and evening ski lessons are 
$4. 

These rates are only available with validated College ID and are payable to Ski 
Sawmill. Transportation will be provided and wUl leave the LRC bus loop. 

In addition, two ice skating trips to Sunbury Youth and Community Center, 
Sunbury, are being provided from 5:30 p.m. to 10 p.m. on Thursday, Feb. 7 and 
Thursday Feb. 28. 

Skate rentals are 50 cents. The trip" is free to students, faculty and staff with 
ticket and validated College ID, Students may sign-up in Room A137, Lifelong 
Education Center. Transportation will leave the LRC bus loop. 

A tobogganing trip to Eagles Mere is being offered Sunday, Feb. 17. 
Transportation will leave the LRC bus loop at 10 a.m. and return at 3 p.m. The 
trip is free to all students, faculty and staff. Interested persons may sign-up in 
Room A137, LEC and pick up a ticket. 

All activities are weather permittiiig. 



4aSPOTUGHTaMoiidi;, Febinir; 4. 1985 

Coed Volleyball 



All games played on Court 4 

Mondif, Feb. 4 

6:00 Cardiac Kids vs. Bums 

7:00 No Names vs. VT I02's 

8:00 Volts vs. Ball WACCcrs 

Wedoeidir, Feb. 6 

6:00 No Names vs. Volts 

7:00 Cardiac Kids vs VT I02's 

8:00 bums vs. Ball WACCers 

Moodiy, Feb. II 

6:00 No Names vs. Cardiac Kids 

7:00 Bums vs. Volts 

8:00 Ball WACCers vs VT I02's 

Wedoeidiy, Feb. U 

6:00 No Names vs. Bums 

7:00 Ball WACCers vs. Cardiac Kids 

8:00 VT I02's vs. Volts 

Moidiy, Feb. 25 

6:00 Volts vs. Cardiac Kids 

7:00 No Names vs. Ball WACCers 

8:00 VT I02's vs. Bums 

Wednesday, Feb. 27 

6:00 Cardiac Kids vs. Bums 

7:00 No Names vs. VT I02's 

8:00 Volts vs. Ball WACCers 

Monday, Marcb 4 

6:00 No Names vs. Volts 

7:00 Cardiac Kids vs. VT I02's 

8:00 Bums vs. Ball WACCers 

Wedoeidiy, Marcb 6 

6:00 No Names vs. Cardiac Kids 

7:00 Bums vs. Volts 
8:00 Ball WACCers vs. VT I02's 
Playoffs are the week of Match 1 1 . 



SPORTS SCHEDULE 

SPORTS SCHEDULE, 



Volleyball 
Division 1 

Tuesday, Feb. 5 

6:30 -• Plunkers vs. Ballbangers 

7:30 - Bums vs. independents 

8:30 - Payton Gang vs. No names 

TbuKday, Feb. 7 

6:30 - Payton Gang vs. Bums 

7:30 - Plunkers vs. No names 

8:30 •• Ballbangers vs. Independents 

Tneiday, Feb. 12 
6:30 - Payton Gang vs. Plunkers 

7:30 - Ballbangers vs. Bums 

8:30 - Independents vs. No names 

Tbnriday, Feb. 14 

6:30 - No names vs. Bums 

7:30 - Independents vs. Plunkers 

8:30 - Payton Gang vs. Ballbangers 

Toesdiy, Feb. 25 

6:30 - Payton Gang vs. IndependenU 

7:30 - No names vs. Ballbangers 

8:30 - Bums vs. Plunkers 

Tbnndiy, Feb. 28 

6:30 - Plunkers vs. Ballbangers 

7:30 - Bums vs. Independents 

8:30 - Payton Gang vs. No names 

Tieiday, Marcb 5 

6:30 - Payton Gang vs. Bums 

7:30 - Plunkers vs. Bums 

8:30 - Ballbangers vs. Independents 



Volleyball 
Division 2 



Tuesday, Feb. 5 

6:30 Scumbazzards vs. Dudley's 

7:30 Hacker's vs. Eliminators 

8:30 Grace St. Fudge Packers vs. Slaub 

Greenies 

Tbnrsday, Feb. 7 

6:30 Scumbuzzards vs. Hacker's 

7:30 Grace Si. Fudge Packers vs. Dudley's 

8:30 Siraub Greenies vs. Eliminators 

Taedsay, Feb. 12 

6:30 Scumbuzzards vs. Grace St. Fudge Packers 

7:30 Straub Greenies vs. Hacker's 

8:30 Eliminators vs. Dudley's 

Thonday, Feb. 14 

6:30 Dudley's vs. Hacker's 

7:30 Eliminators vs. Grace St. Fudge Packers 

8:30 Scumbuzzards vs. Straub Greenies 

Tuesday, Feb. 26 

6:30 Hacker's vs. Grace St. Fudge Packers 
7:30 Dudley's vs. Siraub Greenies 
8:30 Scumbuzzards vs. Eliminators 

Thnnday, Feb. 28 

6:30 Scumbuzzards vs. Dudley's 

7:30 Hackers vs. Eliminators 

8:30 Grace St. Fudge Packers vs. Straub 

Tuesday, Marcb 5 

6:30 Scumbuzzards vs. Hackers 

7:30 Grace St. Fudge Packers vs. Dudley's 

8:30 Straub Greenies vs. Eliminators 



** 

Basketball 

Monday, Feb. 4 

6:30 - Bums vs. Moondogs 
7:30 -■ G-town vs. Pavton Ganc 

Wednesday, Feb. 6 

6:30 - Dunk-you-very-much vs. G-town 

7:30 - Bums vs. SPOTLIGHT 

8:30 - Moondogs vs. Payton Gang 

Monday, Feb. 11 

6:30 -- Dunk-you-very-much vs. Bums 

7:30 ~ Moondogs vs. G-town 
8:30 - Payton Gang vs. SPOTLIGHT 

Wednesday, Feb. 13 
6:30 - SPOTLIGHT vs. 0-town 
7:30 - Payton Gang vs. Bums 
8:30 - Dunk-you-very-much vs. Moondogs 

Monday, Feb. 25 
6:30 - Dunk-you-very-much vs. fayton tjang 
7:30 - SPOTLIGHT vs. Moondogs 
8:30 - G-town vs. Bums 
Wednesday, Feb. 27 

6:30 - Bums vs. Moondogs 
7:30 - G-town vs. Payton Gang 
8:30 - Dunk-you-very-much vs. SPOTLIGHT 
Monday, March 4 

6:30 - Dunk-you-very-much vs. G-lown 

7:30 - Bums vs. SPOTLIGHT 

8:30 - Moondogs vs. Payton Gang 



New program has begun 
at the North Campus 

Last Saturday started the beginning 
of a six-month non-credit Human Ser- 
vices worker training program. This 
program is designed to prepare people 
for entry level positions in nursing 
homes, hospitals, group homes, day 
care centers or to work as home health 
aids or in juvenile detention centers. 

According to Dr. Cathryn L. Ad- 
dy, dean of the North Campus, the pro- 
gram is designed to enable students to 
immediately enter the job market or to 
go on to school in the Human Services 
program or Practical Nursing program. 

The course will run from Feb. 2 to 
July 31. Classes will meet every Tuesday 
and Thursday from 6:30 p.m. to 9:30, 
and every other Saturday from 9 a.m. 
to 3 p.m. 

Class capacity is 20 with 18 already 
enrolled. 

Dr. Addy added that if this pro- 
gram goes well, it may be added as an 
accredited course. 

The program has already been im- 
plemented at the Main Campus. 

Currently at the North Campus is a 
EUCHRE tournament. This card game 
is similar to bridge and the students are 
very enthusiastic, she said. 

The College Board of Trustees 
adopted the Long Range Planning 
Guide during its October meeting tn 
1982, The lenglhly document was 
designed to completely outline a self- 
study of the College. 



City hospital doctor 
performs special surgery 

Courtesy of Williamsporl Hospital 

Dr. R. Soundararajan, recently 
performed a new bladder operation on a 
Jersey Shore RD 2 man that involved 
implementing an internal collection bag. 

The neurologist, known as "Dr. 
Sandy", stated that the new type of 
operation is advantageous because the 
former bladder operations left the col- 
lection bag outside the body and caused 
"social discomfort." 

The man who received the opera- 
tion, 81-year-old Harold P. Whiting, 
stated he felt the procedure went 
"beautifully." 

The procedure was developed by a 
Swedish doctor in 1967 and it is 
estimated that 40 to 50 operations of 
this kind have been done in the United 
States, mainly in California. 

The new procedure can also be us- 
ed to convert external bags. 

New officers ... 

Continued from Page /■■■ 
Bank, Jersey Shore; and Albert 
Strycula, president. Valley Farms, 
Williamsport. 

Permanent members include Dr. 
Robert L. Breuder, College president; 
Dr. Miles Williams, dean of employee 
and community relations at the College; 
and Mario Caldera, chairman of the 
College's Board of Trustees. Frederick 
T. Gilmour serves as executive director 
of the foundation. 



Student aid notebooks available 



Students interested in external 
financial aid notebooks offering scholar- 
ships and loans have been organized 
and are now available throughout the 
campus, according to Donald S. Shade, 
director of financial aid. 

He said that the scholarships and 
loans are available to students from 
assorted curriculums and areas. 

"There is a lot of money that 
private organizations and educational 
groups have available, but not many 



students know about them," Shade 
said. 

The application procedures, 
eligibility requirements and the amount 
of money available are included in the 
notebooks. 

According to Shade, they are 
available in the library, admissions of- 
fice, all division offices, developmental 
studies office, financial aid office, at the 
North Campus and development and 
placement office. 



^^Valentine's Day Love Bouquet^ 



,_ T -^ carnations, baby's 
TOII breath, fern and ribbon in 

a glass bud vase with 

card. Only $3.50 



Single carnations are also \ 
available 60' each or$6a\ 
dozen (fern and bow ex- 
tra) 



add a special touch with an 7 love you balloon 'for $1 

10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Feb 14 
Academic Center Lobby 
and Susquehanna Room 
foyer 



Staff member hired in tutorial center 



SPOTLIGHTaMondi;, FdinMry 4, KMdS 



Mrs. Ronna S. McMurtrie has 
joined the staff in the DevelopmentaJ 
Studies office in the Learning Resources 
Center (LRC) as the assistant director 
and educational specialist. 

She is a PhD. candidate at the Pen- 
nsylvania State University in curriculum 
and instruction with emphasis on 
reading. 

Mrs. McMurtrie was the director- 
owner of Educational Specialists in 
Williamsporl before coming to the Col- 
lege. 

Some of the professional organiza- 
tions Mrs. McMurtrie belongs to in- 
clude International Reading Associa- 
tion, College Reading Association, 
Association for Supervision and Cur- 
riculum Development and International 
Council for Computers in Education. 

Mrs. McMurtrie works primarily 




with students in the Higher Education 
Equal Opportunity Program (Act 101) 
which involves approximately 125 
students. In this program she instructs 
the students how to use the study skills 
in all subject areas. 

When she is not working, Mrs. 
McMurtrie enjoys reading, sewing, 
crossword puzzles, old movies and 
working with computers. 



How do you rate on health? 

The following information was provided by Janet R. Querimit, R.N. 



FIT FACTS 

How much do you know 
about health? Take this little test, 
prepared by Aetna Life i Casual- 
ty, and find out: 

1. A 110-pound person 
bicycling for 60 minutes at 10 
mph will burn approximately how 
many calories? A) 500 B) 750 C) 
1,000 D) 1,250. 

2. The average American 
eats how many pounds of sugar 
annually? A) 12 B) 55 C) 108 D) 
128. 

3. How many pounds of salt 
does the average American con- 
sume annually? A) 2 B) 15 C) 32 
D)73. 

4. According to the 
American Lung Association, how 
much more are smokers absent 
from work than their nonsmoking 
counterparts? A) 10-15 percent 
B) 20-30 percent C) 35-45 percent 



U) 50 percent. 

5. How many chemicals can 
be found in cigarette smoke? A) 
25 B) 125 C) 1,000 D) 1,500 

6. How many calories can be 
found in a meal consisting of a 
hamburger, french fries, a 
strawberry shake, and a cherry 
pie? A) 875 B) 1,150 C) 1,400 
D)2,100 

The answers are: 1,A; 2,D; 
3,B; 4.C: 5,C; 6.C. 

If you did poorly, you might 
want to get a copy of Aetna's 
"Start Taking Charge, " a concise 
guide with removable sections on 
how to improve your diet, get 
more exercise, quit smoking, and 
deal with stress. For a copy, 
send $6.95 to "Start Taking 
Charge, " Aetna Life & Casualty, 
Box 104, Hartford, Connecticut. 




Come DANCE With 
PHI BETA LAMBDA 

FEATURING: 

NOT QUITE RIGHT RON WRIGHT 

Playing Top 40 Dance Tunes 

Quality Inn (Route IS) South Williamsport 

Thursday, February 14 

7:30-? 

$2.00 admission at the door 

Don't forget about Ihi- 51b. Ijox of candy 

to be ratned off during the Dance. 

FREE Raffle Tickets Available in the PBL Office 

IROOM 3 BASEMENT OF ACC BUILDING) 



DANCE ALL NIGHT WITH YOUR FRIENDS 




'ampus Candids 




EYEING UP HIS SHOT is Jeffrey L. Cilhcirt, » haman service student of 
Lock Hiven. /photo by Richard E. Kopp Jr./ 



Valentine's dance at Quality Inn 
Feb. 14, sponsored by PBL 

All students are invited to a Valentine's Day dance at the Quality Inn, Route 
15, Williamsport, which is to be sponsored by Phi Beta Laihbda (PBL), according 
to David E. Davenport Jr., business management student from South 
Williamsport. 

Admission will be $2 per person. 

Ronald J. Wright, broadcasting student from Williamsport will be playing Top 
40 music. 

A five pound box of candy will also be raffled off at the dance, according to 
Jonathan F. Miller, computer science student from Williamsport and PBL presi- 
dent. Tickets are available in Room 3, Academic Center (basement). 

It's tax time-need help? 

Fourth semester accounting students at the College will be providing free tax 
assistance Feb. 1 1 through April 1 1 at the main campus. 

About one dozen student volunteers will be providing tax assistance for those 
who are confused about filling out a tax return and for those who cannot afford to 
pay for professional assistance. 

Phillip D. Landers, associate professor of business administration and coor- 
dinator for the Volunteer Income Tax Assistance Program (VITA) at the College, 
says the student volunteers are trained in basic returns preparation by the Internal 
Revenue Service. Students will assist taxpayers with the Forms 1040A , 1040EZ and 
the basic form 1040, including exemptions, deductions and special credits for which 
some taxpayers may be eligible. 

Taxpayers interested in free tax help should bring their tax packages, W-2 
forms, interest statements and other pertinent tax documents to the VITA center, 
which is located in the tutorial lab in the Learning Resources Center (LRC). 

The Center will be open from noon to 5 p.m. Mondays through Thursdays, 
Monday Feb. II through Thursday April 11, except for the week of April 1 to 5, 
when the Center will be closed. 



ARTISTS UNLIMITED 

A Special Breakfast 

A light breakfast offering of: 

•Orange Juice 
•Breakfast Pastries 
•Coffee 



6DSPaTLIGHTaM0Dd<;, Ftbniir; 4,19M 

Special session 
this week 

on interviewing and 
resume writing 

The Counseling, Career Develop- 
ment, and Placement staff is offering a 
number of specialty sessions to students 
at the College who will soon enter the 
job market. 

Counselors conducting these ses- 
sions will be Thomas M. McNally, 
Thomas C. Shoff, Kathryn A. Ferrence, 
and Weldon W. Michael under the 
guidance of Lawrence W. Emery Jr., 
director of counseling, career develop- 
ment, and placement. 

Students interested in attending 
these sessions should contact the 
Counseling Office, Learning Resources 
Center, Room 157. 

Main campus sessions are schedul- 
ed to take place in Room 205A of the 
LRC on the following days: 

RESUME WRITING 

February 4-10 a.m. 
February 5-10 a.m. 
February 5-3 p.m. 
February 6 - 12:30 p.m. 
February 7-2 p.m. 



Forestry students to take 
part in community project 

Secondary forestry science students 
will be taking part in a community ser- 
vice project at Indian Park, which is ad- 
jacent to Route 220. 

The surveying and mapping of a 
nature trail will begin in approximately 
four weeks. 

The students have done past com- 
munity projects for Pennsylvania Power 
and Light Company and the state Fish 
and Game Commission. 

Also at the beginning of the Fall 
semester, eight computers were purchas- 
ed for the forestry science students. This 
"state of the art technology" will enable 
students to determine the economical 
value of a particular forest or sections of 
trees. 

Currently there are fifty-three 
secondary students in the forestry 
science program. According to Dennis 
E. Ringling, associate professor of 
forestry technology, 30 percent of the 
secondary students go on to higher 
education and another 30 percent find 
jobs in their related field. Twenty per- 
cent go into the service. 



■Campus Candids' 




ANOTHER EXAMPLE OF 

the hands-on experience here at 
the College is tile-colting, practic- 
ed by Scott E. CarroU, a con- 
slmction carpentry stndenl of 
Harrisbnrg. [Pholo by Richard E. 
Kopp Jr.j 



INTERVIEWING SKILLS 

February 11-3 p.m. 
February 12 - 10 a.m. 
February 13 - 10 a.m. 
February 13-2 p.m. 
February 14 - 11 a.m. 

Sessions are also scheduled for the 
Natural Resources Management Center 
on Feb. 8 and 15 at noon. Students may 
sign up at Dr. Wayne R. Longbrake's 
office, division director. 



Emery to speak in NYC 

Lawrence W. Emery Jr., director 
of counseling, career development and 
placement, will be co-presenting a 
workshop on the College's "Career Ex- 
ploration for Adults" program from 
April 2 to 5 at the American Associa- 
tion of Counseling and Development 
convention center in New York City. 

Emery will be describing the pro- 
gram to about 30 members, along with 
Anna D. Weitz, a former College 
counselor, who is now coordinator of 
career development and placement at 
Somerset County Community College, 
Somerset, New Jersey. 

Emery noted the association is the 
largest counseling organization in the 
United States, and is headquartered in 
Alexandria, Virginia. 



Several scholarships were 
established during 1984 

Several scholarships were established with the College Foundation, Inc. during 
1984 with the most significant being the Valley Farms Dairy Scholarship for Dairy 
Herd Management and Agribusiness students. This scholarship will provide two 
$500 awards annually for students in each of the programs. 

Another important scholarship was created by the wife of the late Dr. Henry 
G. Hager Jr., a Williamsport surgeon. This memorial was established by Mrs 
Hager to benefit students in the Surgical Technology program. 

A memorial account was instituted in the name of Hugh M. MacMuUan, pro- 
fessor emeritus in the College's English department. Mr. MacMuUan, who retired 
from the College in 1973 as a fiill professor of English, died in 1981. 

The scholarship was fiinded with donations from his colleagues and a matching 
grant from the Armco Foundation. Eight wood products technology scholarships 
were administered during the year with fiinds donated to the Penn York 
Lumbermen's Association by various regional lumber companies. 

A major scholarship was named for John A. Savoy of Williamsport in honor 
of his lifelong dedication to the Multiple Sclerosis Society. Several individual 
scholarships were also awarded. Norcen Industries, the American Federation of 
State, County and Municipal Employees, and the West Branch Builders Associa- 
tion donated liinds to underwrite single award scholarships and graduation awards. 

The Foundation's scholarship program supplements the increasing high cost of 
advanced education. In addition to federal and state assistance provided through 
the Financial Aid office of the CoUege, the Foundation makes a direct impact in 
aiding students who might not otherwise be able to continue their education 




May graduates..., 

Remember Tuesday, Feb. 15 deadline to petition to graduate 



PRIZES! £/yj£^ PRIZES! 

The Fame and Fortune 

Contest! 



v.«^- 



V 



^> 



Academic Center Auditorium 

Talents: 

Lip Sync, Breakdance, Comical Acts 
Etc. 
Reserve your place under the spotlight! 

For performing groups: $2.50 single performers 

Contact Phi Beta Lambda $5. 00 group performers 

CALL 327-1334 or 326-6263 $1.00 admission 



Lions = Den ^218 

218 Campbell St., Wmpt. 

Live entertainment 

Thur., FrI., Sat. 

10-2 p.m. 

Lunches Served daily 

WACC special 

Cheeseburger in a garden 






WWAS radio 
names staff 

Staff positions for tlie College's 
student-run radio station, WWAS liave 
been announced by Mrs. Linda R. 
Winiarczyk, broadcasting instructor. 
They are: 

-General manager, news, sports, public 
service: Wesley H. Latchford of Al- 
toona. 

-General manager, music, promotion, 
production: Kevin M. Mix of South 
Williamsport. 

-Program director: Ronald J. Wright of 
Williamsport. 

-Sports director: David L. James of 
Williamsport. 

-Sports department: Vincent Ceccacci 
of Ulysses; David J. Wilston of 
Wellsboro; Anthony J. Tophoney of 
Ashland and Anthony P. Cusate of 
Hazelton. 

-Music director: Jeffrey C. Harvey of 
Williamsport. 

-Music department: Karen S. Ludwig 
of Trout Run; Robert J. Beaver of 
Girardsville and Craig L. Hower of 
Williamsport. 

-Public services director: Cynthia M. 
Perry of Williamsport. 
-Public service department: Frank J. 
Nierle of Wilhamsport; Darla M. Diehl 
of Milton; Brian J. Hill of Montgomery 
and James G. Heck of Kane. 
-Promotion director: Dennis C. O'-Day 
of Shamokiu. 

-Promotion department: John A. Kita 
of Williamsport; Wayne R. Smith of 
Wilhamsport and Michael A. Wright of 
Shickshinny. 

-Traffic director: Susan Cowher of 
Millheim. 

-Traffic department: Mark D. Flynn of 
South Williamsport. 
-Production director: Christopher M. 
Fry of Montoursville. 
-Production department: Rodney 
DiStasi of Stroudsburg; A. Clark Bem- 
inger of South Williamsport; Denise A. 
Bonomo of Pitman and Frederick W. 
Rice of Sunbury. 



On Feb. 21, 1984, Denise M. 
McNeil, a computer science student 
from Williamsport, bowled a career 
high of 186 during intramural bowhng 
at ABC Lanes. 



I— Campus Candids- 




SPOTLIGHT PHOTOGRAPHER Richard E. Kopp Jr. canghl 
College stodents eagerly waiting in line to "chow down" in the Sus- 
qnehanna Room (lop photo) and others stndying, eating, or 
socializing (bottom photo). 



SPOTLIGHTDMoDda;, Fcbniwy 4,19Md7 



Le Jeune Chef 



Le Jeune Chef will be open for din- 
ners every Monday, Wednesday and 
Thursday from 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. 

Monday, February 4 

French Onion Soup Gratinee 

Cole Slaw 

Baked Ham with Raisin Cider Sauce or 

Stuffed Peppers 

Glazed Sweet Potatoes 

Braised Celery 

Soft Rolls 

Dessert: Cherry Cheesecake 

Wednesday, February 6 

Consomme Royale 

Sauerbraten with Gingersnap Gravy 

Potato Pancake 

Bavarian Black Bread 

Dessert: Apple Flan 



JOE MIGNANO'S SUB SHOP 
CORNER OF 2nd & MAYNARD 

PHONE 323-7443 

One Block from W.A.C.C. 



Daily Specials 



Monday Regular Sub 
Tuesday Meatball 
Wednesday Turkey 
Thursday Ham 
Fiiday Tuna 
Saturday Cheese Steak 



Whole $1.60 
Whole $1.75 
Whole $1.40 
Whole $1.80 
Whole $1.70 
Whole $2.50 



Hours: Mon.-Sat. 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. Closed Sun. 



Thursday, February 7 

Cream of BroccoU Soup or Superb 
Tomato Juice 
Mushrooms a la Greque 
Com Muffins 
Baked Stuffed Pork Chops or RoUatini 
of Turkey Breast 
Whipped Potatoes 
Carrots with Nutmeg 
Desert: Apple Pandowdy or Pineapple 
Orange Creme 
Le Jeune Chef will be open for lun- 
cheons every Tuesday, Thursday and 
Friday, 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. 



88.1 FM 

Everything You 

Always Wanted in a 

Radio Station... and 

Less. 



k Classical 

* Top 40 
: Rock t, Roll 




Commercial Free 



[Editor's Note: The following is 
the first of a weekly column series by 
Lawrence W. Emery Jr., director of 
counseling, career development and 
placement. Questions or comments 
concerning the column may be directed 
to " Counselor's Corner, " c/o 

SPOTLIGHT, or Emery's office. Room 
157, Learning Resources Center./ 

How can I exercise more control 
over my studies? 

Realizing you want to have, or can 
have, more control over your course 
work is an important first step. Know- 
ing what you want to realize from your 
College experience is another important 
step in motivating yourself to change 
and be able to exercise more control. 
Planning the use of your time will allow 
you to be in charge of your studying 
and will also allow you to be much 
more efficient. 
How can I use my time better? 

If you want to use vour time better 
then it may be helpful to know how 
you are using yoiir time now ana you 
can do that by keeping a "Diary of 
Time." A sample of this form is 
available in the office of CounseUng, 
Career Development and Placement, 
Room 157, LRC. Simply write down 
what you have done directly after you 
have done it. 

For instance, I left the house at 
7:15 a.m. and arrived at work at 8:00 
a.m. The activity I engaged in then was 
driving to work and I spent 45 minutes 
doing it. Each day has 24 hours in it 
and each week has 168 hours in it and 
you should find after you monitor your 
time for a week, there is plenty ol tune 
to do what you have and want to do. 
How will this diary help me? 

Make a summary of your Diary of 
Time so you will know how many hours 
you slept, studied each subject. This 
summary will allow you to plan your 
time which is the next step in managing 
time. If you found that you could not 
keep track of your time, then you need 
to ask yourself "why?". You may not 
be motivated enough to improve how 
you use your time if you cannot keep 
track of how you spend your time. 

The next session will discuss how to 
develop a schedule of time that you con- 
trol. 



SaSPffTUGHTDMondiy, Febniirj 4,I»M 



CAMPUS ACTIVITIES JOB OPENINGS 



For the week of Monday. Feb. 4 through Sunday, Feb. 10. 
ACTIVITIES 

Downhill Skiing...^ p.m. to midnight, this Wednesday, Feb. 6, at Ski 
Sawmill, Morris, sponsored by College Activities. 

Ice Skating.. .6 to 10 p.m., this Thursday, Feb. 7, at Sunbury Youth and 
Community Center, free admission to students, faculty and staff with ticket and 
validated ID; skate rentals, 50 cents; sign up in Room A137, Lifelong Education 
Center and pick up ticket; sponsored by College Activities. 

Cross Country Skiing... 4 to 7 p.m., this Thursday, Feb. 5, at White Deer Golf 
Course, free admission to students, faculty and staff, with validated ID; rentals, 
$2.50 for the first hour and $1.50 for the second hour for students with validated 
ID and the same prices as above plus a $1.50 trail fee for all others; sponsored by 
College Activities. 

Rollerskaling... 8 p.m. to midnight, this Thursday, Feb. 7, at Skating Plus, $2 
admission or free to faculty, staff and students with validated College ID; skate ren- 
tals, 75 cents; sponsored by Student Government Association. 

Trip...M\ day, this Saturday, Feb. 9, at Montage Recreation Center, Scran- 
ton; sign up in Room A137 by tomorrow, Feb. 5; sponsored by the Ski Club. 

Food Drive...Todiy, Feb. 4 to II, students bring in food and/or money to 
help a local community organization or needy family or both; all contributors can 
put their name in a box for a $5 gift certificate at the College bookstore; drawing 
will be held at 3:30 p.m., this Friday, Feb. 8, Room A137, Lifelong Education 
Center; sponsored by the Circle K Club. 

Validation... 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., this Tuesday and Wednesday, Feb. 5 and 6, at 
the North Campus, Wellsboro, for students of that campus. 

MEETINGS 

Narcotics Anonymous... 7 p.m., this Wednesday, Feb. 6, Room 118, Building 
Trades Center. 

Student Government Association... Execuim Committee, 4 p.m. tomorrow, 
Feb. 5, Room B107, Lifelong Education Center. 

Student Government Association... Senate meeting, 5 p.m. tomorrow, Feb. 5, 
Room B107, LEC. 

Multi-Cultural Society... 1 p.m. this Wednesday, Feb. 6, Room 159, Learning 
Resources Center. 

Alpha Omega...! p.m. tomorrow, Feb. 5, Room 132, Academic Center. 

SPORTS 

Basketball... S p.m. tomorrow, Feb. 5, against Northampton County Com- 
munity College, away. 

Basketball... 2 p.m. this Saturday, Feb. 9, against Montgomery County Com- 
munity College, away. 

The top seven U.S. political action Realtors Political Action Committee, 

committees are: the National Congres- the Citizens for the Republic, United 

sional Club, the National Conservative Auto Workers Voluntary Community 

Political Action Committee, the Fund Action Program, and the Aiiierican 

for a Conservative Majority, the Medical Political Action Committee. 



BENSON 



#Ifi1 mini. ^ 
nnM market 



Information was provided by Lawrence W. Emery Jr. director of counseling, 
career development and placement. For more information on the following job 
openings. Emery may be contacted at College Ext. 246. 
Part-lime Student 

The Williamsport National Bank is interested in hiring four typists part-time 
for a temporary assignment. Hours between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. are flexible. Call 
Pete Stockett at 326-2431, Ext. 274 for an appointment for an interview. 

A local radio station would like a journalism or broadcasting student to work 
as a copy writer three hours per day, five days per week. Prefer 9-12 but can do it 
in the afternoon. Need good writing skills. If interested, sign up rn the Placement 
Office. 
Permanent '85 fjriduales 

Machinist General and Machine Tool Technology; Design Engineer Re- 
quiremenU) Send a resume to Robert A. Lewis, Kennametal, Inc. P.O. Box 30700, 
Raleigh, NC 27622. 

Electrical Occupations: Pure Tech, Inc. 13 Silicon Way, Bradford, PA 16701 
would like resumes, if you are interested in motor rewinding, and live no more than 
30 miles from Bradford. Send resume to the attention of Greg Huber. 

Wood Products: The Mann and Parker Lumber Co., Box 18, Constitution 
Ave., New Freedom, PA 17349 is interested in a Wood Products graduate for their 
distribution sales department. Applications are available in the Placement Office. 
They should be sent, along with a resume and transcript to the attention of Daniel 
B. iCeeney, office manager. 

College has job openings 

Personnel Office has the following job openings: Part-time and substitute in- 
structors in Electrical. Carpentry and Plumbing. 

Temporary full-time instnictor in forestry, secondary-vocational programs; 
Dean of Educational Research, Planning and Evaluation; Director of Integrated 
Studies; and Secretary to Director of the College Foundation. 

Temporary regular part-time research assistant; Program assistant, Youth 
Employment and Training Program for Clinton County; Programmer /Analyst; 
Director of Physical Plant. 

Positions open internally are: regular, part-time toolroom attendant at 
machine shop and secretary to business and computer technologies. 

Deadlines for applications are open and salarycommensuratewilh credentials. 

The Personnel Office is located in Room 314, Lifelong Education Center 

(LEC). 

Ride needed from Selinsgrove on 
FOR SALE: Men's black bowling Thursday for two students to leave at 
shoes, size %Vi. Very good condition, noon and lo go bacli at 5 p.m. Contact 
$8 or best offer. CaU Judy at Ell. 219. SPOTLIGHT office at Ext. 221, 
Academic Center basement or call 



Free glaucoma screening (717^74^97^ w^orKeUy 



According to Mrs. Janet R. 
Querimit R.N. .College nurse, there will 
be a glaucoma screening, (checking the 
pressure of the eye), Monday, Feb. 11 
at 10:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. The screen- 
ing will be done by the Blind Associa- 
tion is accordance with Health Week, 
Feb. 11 through 14. 

Anyone with questions should con- 
tact Mrs. Querimit at Ext. 224. 



Coxnei of 3rd coid Mayncnd Sts. 



Always Open: 
All Night 
Sundays 
and Holidays 



StiKfWiU, 

why fuM? 
Stop by 





CILLO'S COLLEGE CORNER 

We'll prepare your favorite Subs and Burgers the way 
you like them! 

Play LUCKY NUMBERS and win a half sub plus a medium 
drink. Four winners every week! 

Cillo's College Corner 

1 100 W. Third St. .Williamsport /'"V" 

(Next to Academic Centerl Phone Ahead: 322-1321 (-- > 

Hours: 7:30 a.m. to 6 p.m. 
Fri. 7:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. 




Spotlight 

Mondiy. Febnury II. 1985 • Vol. 20, No. 24 • 8 Piges 
Willlamsport Area Communily College • Williamsporl, Pa. 17701 




Goal set for March 1 



Commission sets agenda 



The Area Commission on College 
Sponsorship met Jan. 31 to set a goal of 
reaching an interim solution to the Col- 
lege's sponsorship situation by March 1. 

The purpose of the College forming 
the commission is to work out the solu- 
tion before the College's sponsorship 
agreement with the 20 sponsoring school 
districts expires June 30, 1985. 

Commission Chairman John T. 
Detwiler said the school districts are 
concerned about sponsor costs because 
their task involves providing education 
for grades kindergarden through 12th. 

The commission will try to get 
legislation passed to provide more state 
aid for the costly technical courses, ac- 
cording to Detwiler. The College has a 
highly technical vocational nature and 
such legislation would reduce the finan- 
cial burden on local sponsors. 

A state system is needed similar to 
the state university system for stability 
of all community colleges, and this will 
not happen overnight, Detwiler said. 
There needs to be a workable interim 



partnership, he added. 

As alternatives have been 
evaluated, many, including school 
districts, have acknowledged that a forc- 
ed partnership between the school 
districts and the College will not work, 
because they have different purposes 
and priorities. 

A solution must balance the 
legitimate concerns of various parties 
and center on our area's needs, the 
commission noted. 

According to the commission's 
agenda, a realistic solution must: 

1. Address the legitimate concerns 
of all parties, current sponsors, future 
sponsors, the College Board of 
Trustees, and most critically, the State 
Board of Higher Education. 

2. Asssure uninterrupted educa- 
tional service to the communily . 

3. Identify a viable alternative local 
sponsor which maintains service to the 
majority of present sponsored students. 

4. Assure continued quality educa- 

■■■ Please turn lo Page 3 



Health Week celebrated; 
five events slated this week 



Several events have been scheduled 
in celebration of the College's Health 
Week, slated to begin today and run 
through Thursday. The events are spon- 
sored by Student Health Services and 
the College Activities Office. 

First on the agenda is a glaucoma 
screening test from 10:30 a.m. to 1:30 
p.m. today in Room B-137 of the 
Lifelong Education Center. The service 
is provided by the Lycoming County 
Association for the Blind and staff will 
check fluid pressure in the eye. If 
pressure is elevated, most people can be 
treated successfully with medication. 

A donation will be accepted. 

From 2 to 2:30 p.m. tomorrow, 
Feb. 12, student helpers will be 
available from the Peer Information and 
Referral Center, to discuss the organiza- 
tion. The discussion will be held in the 
Auditorium. 

At the same time period and in the 
same place, a drug and alcohol abuse 
discussion is slated. Symptoms of the 



abuse will be detailed and questions are 
invited. 

In the Auditorium on Wednesday, 
Feb. 13, the WiUiamsport Hospital's 
department of service will present a pro- 
gram on teenage pregnancy. Jan 
Freeman, of the hospital's Family Life 
Planning Center, will be the featured 
speaker. 

On Health Week's last day, the 
WiUiamsport Hospital's occupational 
health testing program staff will be giv- 
ing tests on cholesterol and sugar levels. 

The test, beginning at 7:30 a.m. in 
Room B-107, LEC, will take about five 
minutes, and results can be sent to a 
physician. Cost is $6.50. 

According to Mrs. Janet R. 
Querimit, College nurse, the test re- 
quires pre-registration, which can be 
made by contacting College Ext. 224. 

Free low cholesterol snacks and 
recipes will also be on-hand during the 
testing. 



InSPOTLIGHTDMoiKUy, Febratry II, 1985 



Whaddya Say 



Question 
planning 
sweetheart 
Valentine's Day? 



What are you 
to give your 



for 



Location: Lifelong 
Education Center 
Photos: Donna M.Barnett 
Text: Kelly S. Herrold 







Cathy L. Mllunic, broadcasting 
student from McEwensvllla: "Pro- 
bably I'll take him out (or supper " 



Lynn W. Embick, (ood and 

Lorl A. Miller, dietetic technician hospitality student from Jersey 

student from Alloona: "I'll be ac- 



cepting invilalions on Valentine's Day. 
I'll be going to ttle PBL dance." 



Shore: "...I'm going to give her roses 
and candy. I'm also going to take her 
out to dinner and maybe to a movie." 




Frank J. NIsrIe, broadcasting 
student from Wllllamsport: "red 
roses because I like red roses." 



Editorial on sponsorship 




Kathy M. ZIockle, dietetic 
technician student from Kulpmont: 

" ..send my sweetheart a Valentine 
because he's in the service in North 
Carolina." 



Students' say on plan important 



At press time, the latest 
news on the sponsorship situa- 
tion is that the state will not spon- 
sor the College as a technical in- 
stitute. 

So what's the next plan? 
County and school district spon- 
sorship is out, and now that the 
state sponsorship idea did not 
receive applause, the sponsor- 
ship issue does not look to be 
resolved shortly. 

W/hatever it is. the next plan 
needs to be an idea that has the 
students foremost in mind. If the 
state sponsorship proposal 
would have been instantly 
adopted, several programs, 
courses and services would have 
been cut, and tuition probably 
would have risen dramatically. 

The plan must also be 
equitable to the school districts. 
After ail. it should not be forgot- 
ten that they have put in their time 
and money to help make the Col- 
lege what it is today. 



Richard Eberhart. president 
of the Williamsport Area School 
District, proposed to install a new 
Board o( Trustees made up of 
representatives from area school 
districts. Also included in that 
proposal should be to have stu- 
dent representatives on the 
board, since the student popula- 
tion pays almost half of the Col- 
lege budget. 

Student participation on this 
board would allow for a true 
voice about the way students feel 
and think about Hems of impor- 
tance at the College. 

The only way to get the 
sponsorship situation settled Is 
by cooperation and a little give- 
and-take on everyone's part. The 
SPOTLIGHT urges students to 
write to Eberhart. the Board of 
Trustees, the College president, 
and state and local officials to 
voice their opinions, concerns 
and suggestions. After all. it's 
your College, too 



Greg A. Young, general studies 
student from Wllllamsport: "a card, 
some records, and probably candv" 



The cover illusUation was 
drawn by Martin J. Bonk, an 
advertising art student from 
Wellsboro 






'-H 



r 



Christopher G. Phillips, In- 
tegrated studies student from 
Manhattan: "...I'm going to visit her in 
Manhattan, all she ever wanted was 
everything. The last time I saw her was 
in December." 




Don H. Funt, food and hospitali- 
ty student from BIglervllls: " . go to 

a society gathering because a friend of 
mine's having a Sadie Hawkins party." 

SPOTLIGHT 
IMonday. February 11, 1965 ■ Vol. 20, No. 24 

The SPOTLIGHT Is publislied each Monday 
morning of the academic year, except for Col- 
lege vacations, by journalism and other in- 
terested students ot The Williamsport Area Com- 
munity College 

Office: Room 7. Academic Center. 1005 
W Third St.. Williamsport. Pa 17701 
Telephone: (717) 326-3761. Extension 221. 



The ultimate truce 
emerges in novel 

Book Review by Jennifer S. White 

The novel. The Grandmaster, is 
presented in a unique way. It is a tale 
where the forces of good and evil col- 
lide in a world slightly beyond our own. 

The authors. Warren Murphy and 

Molly Cochran, exquisitely blend love, 

hate, passion, vengeance, mystery. 

and violence into a story that ends far 

from the ordinary. 

The Grandmaster. Justin Gilead, 
and the Prince of Death, Colonel Alex- 
ander Zharkov, are destined to destroy 
or be destroyed. Their paths cross four 
times They leave a trail of destruction 
in their wake, yet neither becomes the 
victor. 

The Grandmaster learns that in 
order for him to exist, his enemy must 
live also because there is no existence 
without light and darkness-good and 
evil. 



Opinions expressed are those of the student 
newspaper or of those whose names accom- 
pany items Opinions do not reflect official opi- 
nion of the Institution. 



THE STAFF 

Karen M Metarko. Managing Editor 

James K fulorrissey. Editorial Page Editor 

Richard E Kopp Jr., Ptiotograptiy Editor 

Donna M, Barnett, Darkroom Teciinician 

Kathryn M Gilbert, Administrative Affairs Editor 

Wanna F Brown, Student Affairs Editor 

Sandra R Taylor, Advertising Manager 

Anne T. fyloratelll. Advertising Assistant 

Kathleen L Elswerl, Sports Editor 

Giseia D Grassley, Production Supervisor 

l^flark S. Schwanke, Rodney D, Hill. Sen/or Staff 

Writers 

REPOBTEBS/STAFF ASSOCIATES 

Cynthia E. A. Hartranft. Kelly S Herrold. 
Sandra L Musgrave, Judith L. Swinehart. Jen- 
nifer S White. LeRoy S. Whitmire Jr 

Jonathan J Kolesar, office manager 

Faculty adviser Anthony N Cillo. 

Acting adviser, f^rs Louise H Sweeney 



Production Staff This Issue 

Karen t^ Metaiko. copy editor; James K Ivlor- 
rissey and Karen M Metarko, videocomposition, 
and Wanna F Brown, Kathleen L Eiswen, 
Kathryn M. Gilben. and LeRoy S Whitmire Jr.. 
production assistants 



New officers elected 
in food and hospitality 

Officers were elected on Wednes- 
day, January 30 for the Food and 
Hospitality Management Student 
Organization. 

The officers are presidenl-Kathryn 
Mary J. ZIockie, a dietetic technician 
student from Kulpmont; vice-president- 
Karen L. Daniels, a food and hospitali- 
ty student from Williamsport, and 
treasurer-Jean M. Warner, a dietetic 
technician student from Williamsport. 
Elections are for one year. 

The advisor for the organization is 
Mrs. Vivian P. Moon, associate pro- 
fessor, food service. 

The next meeting will be held this 
Wednesday, February 13, at 2 p.m. in 
Room BI32, Lifelong Education 
Center. 

On the agenda, they will be 
discussing plans for Open House, 
recognition of outgoing officers and 
graduating seniors. All students in any 
Food and Hospitality programs are en- 
couraged to attend. 

Also: Board member resigns 



■■■ Continued from Page I 



Sponsorship Commission sets agenda 

tional opportunity for individuals with 
different goals and incomes. 

5. Avoid promoting the self-serving 
interest of any single group or in- 
dividuals. 

6. Ensure responsible service to our 
area through appropriate checks and 
balances on the College and on the 
sponsor(s). 

7. Establish stability as soon as 
possible to allow current and prospec- 
tive students. College staff, business and 
industry to plan their futures. 

8. Preserve the current accredita- 
tion from Middle States Association of 
Colleges and Schools which might be 
jeopardized in a major change. 

The Commission also noted that 
the College should be viewed as an asset 
that provides a large return on Invest- 
ment and not as a burden, adding that 
they are committed to developing a ra- 
tional and fair solution. 



SPDTLIGHTDMondiy, Febmiry 




Dr. Robert L. Breuder, College 
president, and Dr. Miles Williams, 
dean of employee and public relations, 
gave the College trustees a lour of the 
area (bat will now house the graphics 




Trustees OK Stage III project; 
detail individual funding 

A $21,143,582 financial plan for 
the College's Stage III building program 
was approved by the College Board oi 
Trustees at their regular February 
meeting. The Department of Education 
has funded more than half of the 
monies, officials noted. 

This spring's construction is set to 
begin primarily on the new Advanced 
Technology and Health Services Center, 
also renovation of two buildings of the 
Technical Trade Center and demolition 
of the old administration building. 

According to figures stated by Dr. 
Robert L. Breuder, College president, a 
total of $11,070,755 - which is 52.36 
percent of the project's costs ~ will be 
paid by the state with matching funds to 
cover the $10,072,827 balance. 

Fifteen percent of the local funding 
will come from the Lycoming County 
Commissioners $3,120,000 allocation 
~a payment deducted from the previous 
commissioners $5 million committment 
to the project. 

Dr. Breuder said that College of- 
ficials sacrificed little by accepting the 
lesser amount. Since $1,552,336 has 
been recovered in Investment interest, 
the county's allocation has served to at- 
tract the necessary additional funding. 

Other major funding consists of 
$1,867,193 in competitive federal voca- 
tional education grants and $1,801,000 Petitioning reminder' 

in the College's Stage III building ac- ° 

count. 

Dr. Breuder said there is $665,000 
in leftover money from two previous 
building programs, $993,000 in transfer 
from the College's capital budget and 
$68,000 in interest. 

Dr. Breuder also noted that 
transfers could include some money 
from the College's sponsoring school 
districts which pay 16 percent of the 



arts department, which was formerly C^dIIpOP Qphp/ft///} 
the College's cafeteria. {Photo by ^^"'-6'' OLIlCUUlt 

Richard E. Kopp jr.i foT recruUment 

announced 

The admissions recruitment 

schedule for visits to area high schools, 

technical schools (AVTS) and other 

places has been released, according to 

Mary Sinibaldi, admissions recruiter. 

The visits began last Monday and 

College's operating costs, but no re- will continue through Wednesday, May 

quests for Stage III money was made of I5. 

the sponsoring districts. The College will continue using the 

Other College financing amounts to evening College Fairs for recruitment of 
a total of $639,000 in College contribu- prospective students and their parents, 
tions; $111,343 in unallocated capital Area high schools being visited are- 

and $416,657 from the school's non- Milton, Danville, Central Columbia 



credit programs; $425,000 assessed of Mlllville, Cedar Crest, Eastern Lebanori 
students from non-sponsor districts; County, Portage, Greater Johnstown, 



$236,631 in interest on federal grant Bald Eagle, West Hazleton, Southern 

money; $147,667 from the College's Columbia. 

1984-85 capital account; $100,000 each Also, Pocono Mountain, 

from non-credit fees and the student ac- Lakeland, Valleyview, Northwest Areai 

tivities fund and $90,000 from the Boiling Springs, Warrior Run, Line 

federally-funded Appalachian Regional Mountain, Muncy, Montoursvllle, 

Commission. Loyalsock, Bishop Newmann, 

Dr. Breuder said contracts will be Hughesville, Montgomery, South 

awarded in late April for the Advanced Williamsport, Jersey Shore, 

Technology and Health Services Center Williamsport, and Selinsgrove. 

construction. And Middleburg, West Snyder, 

The trustees also approved the pur- Canton, Troy, Sullivan County, Mif- 

chase of $129,793 in instructional flinburg, Wellsboro, North Venn, 

equipment, all funded through federal Williamson, Mansfield, Lock Haven,' 

grants. Liberty, Elkland, Bald Eagle Nittanyi 

In personnel matters, a letter of Cowanesque Valley, Northern Potteri 
resignation from Mrs. Joan Howard, and Bucktail. 
trustee, of Montgomery, was read by O'her schools Include Marple, 
Mario Caldera, board chairman. The Tolcroft, and Aston-Delaware County, 
reason noted for the resignation was Brownstown and Willow Street- 
Mrs. Howard's husband accepting a job Lancaster County, Lancaster-Mount 
in Lake Placid, N.Y. The trustees ac- Joy. Upper, Middle Bucks, Bucks 
cepted the resignation. County, North and South Lackawanna 

County, Hazelton, Monroe, 

Philadelphia, North Montco, Sun, 

. Columbia-Montour, Northumberiand 

deadline this Friday county, Greater Johnstown AVTS, 

Friday, Feb. 15 is the last day to Eastern and Western Montgomery 

petition to graduate for May graduates. County, and Central and Northern 

The fee for petioning is $5. Chester County. 

According to Ms. Therese Keen 0"^" P'^'^*'' '" ''^ "s"^'' ^^^'- ^"s- 

student records office transcript clerk Qu^hanna Valley Mall dunng business 

students who do not petition will not week, the Walter Buddie Saul . , , ,„ ..,,^ . ^ 

have their grades evaluated, and those Agricultural Show, the Pennsylvania of study. All matenals I have mentioned 

who petition after the deadline will pay State Farm Home Builders Show, and are in Counseling, Career Deveopment, 

a fee of $10 "" Pennsylvania School Counselors mo Placement in Room 157, Learning 

, ' , ,., , ■ Association Conference. Resources Center. 



Some Rules on Learning and Studying 
Before Schedule Planning 

You have kept track of how you 
spent your time this week, and have 
made a summary of that Time Diary so 
you know how many hours you slept, 
spent on each academilc subject, work- 
ed, played the video games, etc. 

Before we discuss how to build the 
schedule, I want to review some basic 
rules about learning and studying. 

1 . Studying and learning are an ac- 
tive process and one must be actively In- 
volved. 

2. Proper diet, exercise, and sleep 
are essential to good physical and men- 
tal well being. 

3. Studying and learning are most 
efficient when done In short time blocks 
rather than hours at a time. 

4. There should be a regular place 
to study which is free of distractions. 
Normally, radio and T.V. cannot 
enhance the ability to learn. 

5. Studies have indicated for a full- 
time student working at another job 
more than 20 hours a week will decrease 
academic performance. 

6. Forgetting is a rapid process! 
For instance, if a student goes to a lec- 
ture and does not review after the lec- 
ture, he will have forgotten 40-50 per- 
cent of the material within 24 hours and 
within a week will have forgotten 80-90 
percent of the material. 

7. Cramming the night before an 
examination is seldom as effective as 
proper preparation. 

8. It will enhance learning if 
material is read and studied in a lecture 
course before It Is covered in the lecture 
class. 

9. One should review class notes as 
soon after the class as possible as all 
notes and readings should be reviewed 
at least once a week. 

10. In the plan of study, it is easier 
to learn more difficult material/subjects 
first when one is most alert and fresh. 

Although I have listed ten rules, 
there may be many more on specific 
areas such as how to take notes, how to 
prepare for examinations, and how to 
read and there are booklets in the Col- 
lege library which you may want to read 
on each subject. Next time, I will 
discuss how to develop a successful plan 



4DSPOTLIGHTDMond«y, Febrairy II. IMS 




Seven new courses to be offered 



AN ESTIMATED 175 people at- 
tended the Metropolitan Brass 
Qnintet's concert last Sunday, in the 
Academic Center Auditorium, accor- 
ding to Mrs. Jo Ann R. Fremiotti, 
coordinator of intramural athletics and 
College activities. "The program was 



well-received. It was a very good crowd 
and the audience liked the quintet a 
lot. They are excellent musicians as 
well as performers," commented Mrs. 
Fremiotti. fPholo by Richard E. Kopp 
Jr.l 



Anthropology professor to speak 
on Indian nations tomorrow night 



Dr. Marshall J. Becker, Professor 
of Anlhropology at West Chester 
University, will speak on "The First 
Pennsylvanians: Indian Nations" at 8 
p.m. tomorrow night, Feb. 12, in the 
Academic Center Auditorium. The 
program is free. 

The slide-illustrated lecture is spon- 
sored jointly by the College's Special 
Events Committee and the Pennsylvania 
Humanities Council. 

Dr. Becker will speak about the 
Lenape, Munsee, Susquehannock, 
Monongahela, Delaware, and other 
native American tribes who were in this 
country before Columbus. How they 

Stutient survey redone; 
results inaccurate 

Due to lack of response by last 
semester's graduates, the College's stu- 
dent placement study will be redone, ac- 
cording to Ms. Therese Keen, student 
records transcript clerk, who noted the 
present result are not accurate. 

The survey forms are being sent out 
again, and these forms must be returned 
to gel accurate figures. 

The results of the survey are ex- 
pected to be compiled in four to six 
weeks, she added. 



lived, their dealings with each other and 
the Europeans, and what became of 
them is the subject of Dr. Becker's lec- 
ture. 

Dr. Becker is an archaeologist and 
physical anthropologist whose research 
in many areas has achieved interna- 
tional recognition. He earned his Ph.D 
at the University of Pennsylvania, where 
he also earned his undergraduate degree 
with honors in anthropology. 

Anyone wishing further mlorma- 
lion may contact the Intramural 
Athletics and College Activities Office at 
College Ext. 269 

CPR course tomorrow 
at city hospital 

The Williamsport Hospital, Rural 
Avenue, is offering cardio-pulmonary 
resuscitation recertificalion class from 
6:30 to 10:30 p.m. tomorrow in Room 
313, according to a hospital news 
release. 

The class requires pre-registration, 
which may be completed by contacting 
322-7861, ext. 5186 or 5209. 

An eight-hour Basic Life Support 
Class is scheduled for Feb. 25 and 26 
from 6:30 to 10:30 p.m., it was noted. 



PRIZES! 



ENTER 



PRIZES! 



vQ^ 



4..^^ 



^^^, 



^4 



The Fame and Fortune 

Contest! 

Academic Center Auditorium 

Talents: 

Lip Sync, Breakdance, Comical Acts 
Etc. 
Reserve your place under the spotlight! 

For performing groups: $2.50 single performers 

Contact Phi Beta Lambda $5. 00 group performers 

CALL 327-1334 or 326-6263 $L00 admission 



The College Board of Trustees 
recently approved seven new credit 
courses to the academic roster. These 
courses include Civil War History, Col- 
lege Physics I, II, Department 
Ooerating Techniques, Chemistry for 
Graphic Arts, College Reading and 
Study Skills, Introduction to Welding 
Processes, and Women in Literature. 

Civil War History will be im- 
plemented through the Integrated 
Studies Division in Spring 1986. The 
subject is studied through slide tours of 
the Eastern battlefields, a review of 
available print materials, and through 
research projects. The course will be of- 
fered in the evenings. 

College Physics I, II, a two-course 
sequence covering the traditional topics 
of a first or second year college physics 
course, is currently being offered at the 
College as Physics 299. Under the new 
approved format, the course is intended 
for students transferring into bac- 
calaureate programs which include 
physics or associate degree students in 
areas that require a more rigorous treat- 
ment of the subject than is offered in 
PHS 100 (Mechanics). The course does 
not require calculus and would be ap- 
propriate for pre-med and engineering 
technology students. Principles and laws 
of mechanics, heat, and sound are 
covered in some depth through discus- 
sions, labs and problem solving. 

Department Operating Techniques 
has been added to the Surgical 
Technology program curriculum. This 
is a hands-on course covering fun- 
damental equipment operations as used 
in a surgical department. Basic skills 
will be developed in the use of such 
equipment as autoclaves, ultrasonics, 
hypo-hyperthermia, washer sterilizers, 
and endoscopy equipment. The course 

Admissions Office larger 



is intended for second semester surgical 
technology students. 

Chemistry for Graphic Arts will 
introduce graphic arts students to the 
fundamental concepts and techniques of 
chemistry, particularly as applied to 
graphic art areas, with emphasis on the 
chemistry of the photographic process. 
The course will also be transferrable as 
a science elective. 

A replacement course in reading. 
College Reading, Reasoning and Study 
Skills, has been designed to enable 
students to acquire or review basic 
reading and study skills essential for 
success in College courses. Specific skills 
will be taught to develop comprehen- 
sion, vocabulary and speed. This course 
is a revision of the present RDG 101 and 
reflects the addition of one credit. 

Introduction to Welding Processes, 
being offered beginning this semester, is 
designed to give the non-welding major 
the basic competencies in the four main 
welding processes used today. The 
course will be offered as scheduling and 
facility usage permits. 

Women in Literature, a humanities 
elective exploring 20th century 
American literature written about 
women by women, uses literature to ex- 
amine the archetypes and stereotypes, 
from classical times to the present, that 
have shaped the way women see 
themselves and the way others view 
them. The treatment of women in car- 
toons, advertising, music and film, will 
be also used to demonstrate how these 
genres maintain and alter the image of 
r ,Jem women. The course has been 
offered the past three fall semesters as 
an elective and student evaluations have 
supported the addition of the course to 
the credit roster. 

Bookstore tool sale Fri. 



A small office is being built inside , , '^^' College Bookstore will hold a 

^Hmicclnnc „ff,r. in tt ArnH.mir '0«' S*'^"^'" F"day, Feb. 15, aCCOr- 

dmg to Mrs. Eleonore R. Holcomb, 
Bookstore supervisor. 

All tools are already marked down 
and the sale will be "buy one and get 
one at equal or lesser value for half 
price," she added. 



the admissions office in the Academic 
Center to accommodate prospective 
students arid their parents, and people 
visiting the campus for admissions in- 
formation and to tour various pro- 
grams, according to Mary Sinibaldi, 
College admissions recruiter. 



Z> 



Come DANCE With 
PHI BETA LAMBDA 

FEATURING: 

NOT QUITE RIGHT RON WRIGHT 

Playing Top 40 Dance Tunes 

Quality Inn (Route 15) South William.sporl 

Thursday, February 14 

7:30-? 

$2.00 atJmission at the door 

Don'l (brgft about the ."jib. box of t-andy 

to be ratrifd olT duiing the Dance. 

FREE Raffle Tickets Available in the PBL Office 

(ROOM ,1 BASEMEIVT OF ACC BUILDING) 



^ 



I DANCE ALL NIGHT WITH YOUR FRIENDS | 



Graphic Arts Department, 
Duplicating and Mail Services 
start move to Academic Center 



Duplicating and Mail Ser- 
vices, and (he graphics arls 
department began moving chores 
last week due the scheduled 
demolition of the old administra- 
tion building in late February or 
early March, the area where both 
were formerly housed. The mail 
room has relocated to the 
Academic Center basement, and 
graphics arts is moving to the 
ACC basement and the former 
cafeteria. Staff from mail services 
asked that if anyone has new jobs 
to be printed between now and 
March IS, they should contact 
Barbara A. Johnson, director of 
communications, at College Ext. 
253. IPhotos by Richard E. Kopp 
Jr.l 





SPOTLIGHTDMonda;, Febnurj II, 1985d5 



Le Jeune Chef 



Le Jeune Chef will be open for lun- 
cheons Tuesday and Friday, 11 a.m. to 
1 p.m., and they will be closed Valen- 
tine's Day. 

Tuesday, February 12 
New England Clam Chowder 
Chicken with Tarragon In Bed of 
Fettuccine 

Southern Corn Pudding or Brossu with 
Olive Butter Sauce or Blueberry Muffins 
Frozen Fluffy Strawberry Pie or 
Coconut Cake 

Friday, February 15 
Tomato Soup 

Beef Strips with paprika cream sauce 
Noodles with green peppercorn butter 
Green Bean Bundles or Hopping John 
Rolls 

Spicy Raisin Coffee cake or chocolate 
mint dessert 

The restaurant will be open for din- 
ners every Monday, Wednesday and 
Thursday from 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. 

Monday, February 11 
Bananas Flip or Lemon Greek 
Caesar's Salad 

Dance tickets available 
at Recreation Center 

Tickets for Rod Rodgers Dance 
Company performance, to be held 

March 2, in the Academic Center 
Auditorium, can be picked up starting 
today in the Recreation Center Office, 
Room A- 137 in the Lifelong Education 
Center. 

Children 12 and under, senior 
citizens, students who have validated 
College ID, and faculty and staff will be 
admitted free. Faculty and staff can ob- 
tain two free tickets until Feb. 22. After 
that date, Ihey will have to pay the 
general admission of $3. 

Information was provided by Mrs. Jo 
Ann R. Fremiotti, coordinator of in- 
tramural athletics and College activities. 



Ragu 



Balentine of Chicken 
Asparagus Spears 
Roll 

Wednesday, February 13 
Navy Bean Soup 
Mandarin Orange Waldorf 
Veal saute normandy 
Meal filled Canneloni with 
Bolognes 
Carrots Vichy 
German Potato Dumplings 
Apple pie a la mode 
Bulgur Honey Bread 

Thursday, February 14 
Rosberry Glazed Ham or London Broil 
with Sauce Robert 
Vichyssoise 

Hot butter Crescent Rolls 
Tossed greens with cucumber dressing 
or Ambrosia Salad with Honey Peanut 
Sauce 

Mushrooms Royale 

Herbed Fettuccine with French Ar- 
tichoke Hearts 

Morta Tortalanda or Frosted Lime 
Mousse with Fresh Kiwi 

Support group scheduled 

Courtesy College Informalion Office 

The Displaced Homemakers office 
at the North Campus in Wellsboro, is 
sponsoring a self-enhancement/support 
group for women who are divorced or 
separated. 

The group meets every Wednesday 
at 7 p.m. and while women need not at- 
tend every session it is in their best in- 
terest to do so. On (he other hand, 
woman who suddenly become interested 
in participating in the group meetings 
can do so even though they were not 
present at initial sessions. Women in- 
terested in attending the group may con- 
tact Beverly McGill, coordinator of the 
displaced homemakers program, at 
724-7703. 



Flowers, Gifts, and Arrangements 




Made up or purchase materials to make your own. For the area's finest Silk and 
Polyethylene Flower arrangements blended with natural dried materials from the forest and 
fields of Pennsylvania. See the folks at Ray Crafts, Inc., comer of Park Avenue and Rose 
St., City. Ray Crafts has just purchased the Lyco. Merchandise Co. and now with combined 
inventory offers the largest supply of flower and craft materials in the east. 

10% discount with WACC i.D. 

• Wedding Supplies • Gifts and Party Goods \ 

• Macrame, Chenile, Bumps, Pom Poms, Large Selection of Beads ^ 

LOOK FOR THE SIGN. . . ' \ 



a u rzarti 




(TM) 

na. °"d 



Lyco Villgga j 

(former Weldon Building) > 



Corner Park Ave. and Rose Street 
PHONE 322-4641 



6aSFOTLIGHTDMoiidar, Febniiry II. I98S 

Intramural Sports Schedule 

Division I Volleyball 

Tuesday, Feb. 12 
6:30 Payton Gang vs Plunkers 

7:30 Ballbangers vs Bums 

8:30 Independents vs No names 

Thursday. Feb. 14 

6:30 No names vs Bums 

7:30 Independents vs Plunkers 

8:30 Pavton Gane vs Ballbangers 

Division II Volleyball 

Tuesday, Feb. 12 

6:30 Scumbuzzards vs Grace St. Fudge 

Packers 

7:30 Straub Greenies vs Hacker's 

8:30 Eliminators vs. Dudley's 

Thursday, Feb. 14 

6:30 Dudley's vs Hacker's 

7:30 Eliminators vs Grace St. Fudge 

Packers 
8:30 Scumbuzzards vs Straub Greenies 



Coed Volleyball 

All games played on Court 4 

Monday, Feb. 11 

6:00 No Names vs Cardiac Kids 

7:00 Bums vs Volts 

8:00 Ball WACCers vs VT I02's 

Wednesday, Feb. 13 

6:00 No Names vs Bums 

7:00 Ball WACCers vs Cardiac Kids 

8:00 VT 102's vs Volts 



■Ski tour offeredi 



Basketball 

Monday, Feb. II 
6:30 Dunk-you-very-much vs Bums 
7:30 Moondogs vs. G-town 
8:30 Payton Gang vs. Spotlight 
Wednesday, Feb. 13 
6:30 Spotlight vs. G-town 
7:30 Payton Gang vs Bums 
8:30 Dunk-you-very-much vs Moondog; 



Open Gym Schedule Scumbuzzards swipe first 



Open gym will be held from 4 to 6 
p.m. tomorrow and Thursday, accor- 
ding to David A. Golfieri, evening ac- 
tivities assistant. 

The weight room will also be open 
from 4 to 10 p.m. this evening, Tues- 
day, and Thursday. 

Open gym is also held from 6 to 10 
p.m. every Sunday, according to 
Golfieri. 

Luzerne upsets Wildcats 

In a close game, Luzerne County 
Community College upset the Wildcats 
last Wednesday by a score of 73-65, ac- 
cording to Harry C. Specht, assistant 
professor, physical education. 

"They played an excellent game," 
commented Specht, "considering that 
Luzerne is placed third in the league 
with a 14-7 overall record." 

At the end of the first half, Luzerne 
was edging the Wildcats by one field 
goal. 

By the end of the second half, 
Luzerne had pulled ahead 42-36. The 
lead continued throughout the rest of 
ithe game with Luzerne victorious over 
the Wildcats. 

Freshman Dave Durham was 
leading scorer with 34 points followed 
by 6'6 John Kellum with 15. 

Tomorrow, the Wildcats will be 
challenging Lehigh County Community 
College away at 8 p.m. In addition, 
they will also be playing Lycoming Col- 
lege at 7 p.m. Thursday, away. 



The Scumbuzzards have regained 
sole possession in the College's bowling 
league after being tied with Lucky 
Strikes for first place last week. They 
are now leading with a 7-2 record, ac- 
cording to results from ABC Bowling 
Lanes. 

Other team standings are: Lucky 
Strikes, 8-4; Defenders of the Faith, 
8-4; Pin Busters, 7-5; Two Plus One, 
6-6; The Outlaws, 5-7; Dew Crew, 3-9, 
and Twilight Zone, 2-10. 

High Team Series: Defenders of the 
Faith, 1838;PinBusters, 1837; Twilight 
Zone, 1748. 

High Team Single: Pin Busters, 
640; Defenders of the Faith, 625; Scum- 
buzzards, 617. 

High Men's Series: Rudy Long, 
588; Rick Jackson, 566; Scott Kehs, 
552. 

High Men's Single: Rudy Long, 
214; Rick Jackson, 205; Paul Maserick, 
204. 

Women's High Series: Denise 
McNeil, 355. 

Women's High Single: Denise 
McNeil, 131. 

Top Five Averages: Mark 
Reamsnyder, 198; Bryan Valentine, 
181; Rudy Long, 175; Rick Jackson, 
170; Paul Maserick, 169. 

Cancellations posted 

Cancellations for winter ac- 
tivities will be posted on the gym 
door and recreation center bulletin 
board, according to David A. 
Golfieri, evening activities assis- 



A cross country ski tour is being offered at the White Deer Golf Course on 
Feb. 26, according to David A. Golfieri, evening activities assistant. 

With a validated College ID, College activities and intramural athletics will 
provide expenses incurred for trail fees, according to Golfieri. 

Student rental fees with a validated ID are as follows: $2.50 for the first hour, 
$1.50 for the second hour and $5 if over two hours. 

Transportation will be provided and will leave the Learning Resources Center 
(LRC) bus loop at 3 p.m. and will return at 6 p.m. 

Sign-ups are being held in Room A-137, Recreation Center Office in the 
Lifelong Education Center. 

Deadeline for signups is 4 p.m. on Feb. 25. 

In addition, an ice skating trip to Sunbury Youth and Community Center, 
Sunbury, is being offered on Feb. 28. Transportation will leave the LRC bus loop 
at 5:30 p.m. and will return at 10 p.m. Skate rental are 50 cents and the trip is free 
to all students, faculty, and staff with a ticket and a validated College ID. 

Downhill skiing trips to Ski Sawmill, Morris, are being provided on Feb. 13 
and 27. Transportation will leave the LRC bus loop at 5 p.m. and will return at 12 
a.m. 

Special rates are available with a validated College ID and made payable to Ski 
Sawmill. 

Also included on the agenda is a toboganning trip to Eagles Mere on Feb. 17. 
Transportation will leave the LRC bus loop at 10 a.m. and will return at 3 p.m. 
The trip is free with ticket and validated College ID. 

According to information provided by Golfieri, all events are available on a 
weather-permitting basis. For weather conditions, students may inquire at the 
Recreation Center Office after 2 p.m. on the day of the activity. For weekend ac- 
tivities, students may call the Recreation Center, College Ext. 412 after 2 p.m. 
Fridays for the weather conditions. 

Students interested in any of the above activities may sign-up in Room A-137, 
LEC, and pick up a ticket. 



Wrestling clinic held 

A wrestling clinic will be held 
from 7 to 10 p.m. tomorrow for 
all individuals who plan to par- 
ticipate in the intramural wrestling 
tournament, according to David 
A. Golfieri, evening activities 
assistant. 

He said that the clinic must 
be attended by all individuals who 
plan to wrestle in the tournament. 

Participants should arrive 
dressed for the session. All rules 
and regulations will be explained 
at the clinic, according to Golfieri. 



Pool schedule pick-up 

Students who are par- 
ticipating in the Pool Tournament 
may pick up schedules and playing 
times in Room A-137, Recreation 
Center Office, in the Lifelong 
Education Center. The tourna- 
ment is scheduled for tomorrow, 
according to David A. Golfieri, 
evening activities assistant. 



^■— Intramural Standings-^— 

Team records for Intramural basketball and volleyball have been tabulated, 
according to David A. Golfieri, evening activities assistant. 
To date, team standings are: 

Men's Basketball 
Bums, 4-0; Moondogs, 3-1; Dunk-you-very-much, 2-2; G-town, 2-2; Payton 
Gang, 1-3; Spotlight, 0-4. 

Division I Volleyball 
Payton Gang, 3-1; Bums, 3-1; Plunkers, 1-3; Ball Bangers, 1-3; Independents, 
1-3; No Names, 1-3. 

Division II VolleybaU 
Eliminators, 4-0; Scumbuzzards, 3-1; Straub Greenies, 3-1; Dudley's, 1-3- 
Hackers, 1-3; Grace St. Fudge Packers, 0-4. 

Coed VoUeyvball 
VT 102's, 3-0; Cardiac Kids, 2-1; Ball WACCers, 2-1; No Names, 2-1; Bums 
0-3; Volts, 0-3. 



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Monday Night Movie 

starts 
7:30 p.m. 

ACCAud. 

$1 with ID 
$2 admission 




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'Dessert winners named' 




WINNERS IN LAST Tuesday's 
Dessert ConlesI in the Le Jeune Cbef 
kitchens were Lynn W. Embick, of 
Jersey Shore, first prize for 
Chocolate Strawberry Cheesecake, and 
Steven J. Orso and Steven Archam- 
bault, both of Williamsport, second 
prize for a Sherbert Bombe. Judges 
were Chris Tompkins, operator of 
Chris Cater-all; Inger Franzen, baking 
instructor; Alice Mantus, owner of 
Alice's Gourmet Shop, and Linda 
Boush, gourmet cook. 



Summer internships noted 

The College has recently received 
noiice of summer internships with the 
Pennsylvania Historical Museum Com- 
mission, according to William C. Brad- 
shaw, director of experimental learning. 

These internships are paid and are 
appropriate for Nursery Management, 
Wood Products, Food Service, and 
Computer Information Systems 
students. The job sites are scattered 
throughout the state and information 
regarding them is available in the ex- 
perimental learning office, Room 157, 
Learning Resources Center, according 
to Bradshaw. 

The notice from the Commission 
serves as a reminder that the best jobs 
are advertised and filled early, and the 
appropriate time to start looking for a 
summer co-op or internship is now, ac- 
cording to Bradshaw. 

Bradshaw also noted that openings 
are regularly posted in each of the Col- 
lege's division offices and on the bulletin 
board outside the experimental learning 
office, as well as in the SPOTLIGHT. 

The Communications, Humanities 
and Social Sciences Division was 
reorganized into the Integrated Studies 
Division in Spring 1983. 

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Bestselling books 
in College library 

Best sellers can be borrowed from 
the College library. The small collec- 
tion, mostly in paperback, is now on 
display near the circulation desk. 

Poland, by James A. Michener, br- 
ings alive seven centuries of history 
through a fictional account of three 
families doomed to live in the bat- 
tleground of eastern Europe. Michener 
is famed for his ability to transform 
complex history into Uving adventure. 

Isaac Asimov's The Robots Of 
Dawn , over six months on the Bestseller 
List, is a science fiction mystery which 
explores the possible future relationship 
between man and robot. A New York 
police detective and his robot partner 
must travel to another planet to solve a 
puzzling case of roboticide. 

The March Of Folly: From Troy 
To Vietnam, is historian Barbara 
Tuchman's exploration of the recurring 
pursuit by governments of policies con- 
trary to their own interests. 

Other books include The 
Chancellor Manuscript by Robert 
Ludlum, The Name Of The Rose by 
Umberto Eco, American Couples by 
Philip Blumstein and Pepper Schwartz, 
Mistral's Daughter by Judith Kiantz, 
and 20J0: Odyssey Two by Arthur C. 
Clarke. 

The library, on the first floor of the 
Learning Resources Center,